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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - June 24, 1961, Mason City, Iowa                             North Iowas Daily Newspaper Edited for the MASON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE HOME EDITION VOL The newspaper that makes all North logons neighbors Associated Press ind United Press International Full Lease MASON CITY IOWA SATURDAY JUNE 24 1961 7c Copr Consist tl Two m Deal is off Castro told DETROIT The proposed swap of American tractors for Cuban invasion prisoners is dead land the Tractors for Freedom Committee accused Cubas Fidel Castro of killing the deal The committee in a bluntly worded statement Friday night said it was folding up because Castros demand for S28 million in cash credit or tractors could only be interpreted as a move calculated to destroy the possibility of agreement The com mittee said Castros proposal for a delegation of prisoners to negotiate the terms was ludi crous The Cuban prime ministers re jection of the committees terms to exchange 500 farm tractors worth about million for 1200 captured rebels was blamed by the committee for the collapse of the monthlong negotiations Cas Atesting Pressure on US By ROWLAND EVANS JR New York Herald Tribune News Service WASHINGTONA confidential report understood to be under White House scrutiny raises seri ous questions about any imme diate United States decision to resume atomic testing The report prepared by the United States Information Agen cy states the presumed reaction abroad to resumption of testing would be very bad for the United States Pressure for a resumption of underground testing is mounting in Congress PRESIDENT Kennedy however has not changed his position that the United States will continue to press the Russians to modify its unacceptable demand for a builtin veto in administering the proposed inspection and enforce ment machinery to police the ban Great secrecy surrounds the re port that the USIA is understood to have sent the President It attempts to assess what the re action in countries abroad would be if the US decided to go ahead on its own with the underground testing of nuclear devices The report is being used along with many other facts to help the administration make a major policy decision It is understood that foreign diplomatic posts report that in India Japan the only nation that has been the victim of atomic large areas of Latin America and some other coun tries the presumed reaction would be highly critical In most of Western Europe it is reported such a decision would be generally accepted as an un happy but understandable move in the cold war in view of the Soviet Unions conduct at the Gen eva talks BUT EVEN in Western Europe a resumption of testing would not be applauded in some of the Scan dinavian countries and would un questionably be castigated by the leftwing element of the British Labor Party and other leftwing parties in Western Europe The entire Communist sector would obviously unloose a major propaganda barrage against the United States But what concerns some of the top officials most concerned with American policy in the develop ing nations both those in the neutral and in the proWestern camp is that the mere phrase atomic testing arouses sharp political reaction This reaction seems to ignore the long and fruit less testban talks in Geneva and the implications of Russias clos eddoor society which it is taken for granted here would permit surreptitious testing NOR DOES IT appear to take into account that the United States has put on the table at Geneva the draft of an entire testban treaty on which the Russians have refused to negotiate What worries officials here who deal with Asian nations is that the reaction there is likely to be highly emotional and hence diffi cult to change Suggestions now are being heard that the United States start at once a series of quiet diplo matic talks in hopes of minimiz ing adverse reaction among neu tral countries in the event the President should decide to resume testing The administration al ready has launched an offensive from a more public platform The first shot was the Presidents speech last week when he declar ed that Soviet Premier Khrush chev had struck a serious blow in Vienna at American hopes for a ttstban agreement tro had called the committees conditions ridiculous THE PRIVATE citizens group headed by Walter P Reuther Mrs Eleanor Roosevelt and Dr Milton E Eisenhower said it is disbanding and plans to return be tween 60000 and 70000 letters it received from its appeal for funds to pay for the tractors The let ters never were opened so theres no way of determining how much money was sent in to PO Box Freedom here Tractors for Freedom Inc was organized at the suggestion of President Kennedy But Kennedy New mission MIAMI 10man pris oner commission is en route from Cuba to the United States in an attempt to open new ex change negotiations it was learned Saturday A relative of one of the prisoners on the com mission said the new mission was disclosed in a phone call from the prisoner in Havana made it clear the U S govern ment would play no part in any exchange The committee dismissed Cas tros proposal of Friday in these words THE LATEST proposal by Dr Castro that a delegation of pris oners whom he holds captive der the threat of penalty of death or long imprisonment can nego tiate the terms of their own re lease is ludicrous It is further evidence of his brutality in cynically playing with the lives of imprisoned men and their relatives the statement added The committee charged Castro reneged on his original offer to release 1214 prisoners for 500 tractors Castro later upped the ante the committee said de manding 28 million worth of heavyduty equipment or 1000 small tractors IT WAS OUR hope to bring freedom to the prisoners and to put more food on the tables of those hungry within Cuba the committee said It is with deep sorrow and dis appointment that we learn that Dr Castros rejection of our com mittees sincere efforts has made mpossible a realization of our humanitarian goals The committee said Castro re jected the offer of 500 farm trac tors and made stronger demands at the very moment we felt there was hope for reaching an understanding on the type of trac tors to be delivered TO BOYS Heston Mason City is one of two lowans named Saturday to attend the 1961 session of Boys Nation at Washington D C The other is Allen Carl Waterloo Both are 17 high school juniors and attended Boys State at Camp Dodge this month They will visit the White House and President Kennedy the Pentagon the State Department Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Supreme Court July 2128 Mike is the son of R L Hes ton athletic director of the Mason City school district Boys Nation is sponsored by the American Legion UNNY Iowa Generally fair through Sun day Rising temperatures highs in the 80s Minnesota Fair and a little warmer Sunday Highs 72 to 82 GlobeGazette weather data up to 8 am Saturday Maximum Minimum At 8 am Sunrise Sunset 74 51 64 VFW stands firm on Red China issue The Iowa Veterans of Foreign Wars in convention here Satur day re affirmed its stand against Red Chinas admission to the United Nations and vig orously opposed the recognition of Red China by the United States It also vigorously opposed rec ognition of any proposal for sep arating the joint chiefs of staff from status as chiefs of the services that would tend to weaken or alter the chiefs of staff system It also passed a resolution for the establishment of a separate and more liberal pension pro gram for World War I veterans based upon reasonable disabil ity income or age criteria REVOLT SPREADS PARIS Farmers revolt spread through France Saturday spiking hopes that government promises of action 0 solve the problem of slump ing farm prices would forestall further demonstrations US avoiding show of militarism in W Berlin Nikita repeats threat MOSCOW GfKPremier Khrush chev reiterated Saturday that h intends to sign a peace treat with East Germany in the nea future At the same time h promised an early boom in Sovie economy It was Khrushchevs third sue warning in a week Khrushchev termed the Gei man peace treaty issue one of th most difficult problems of ou day and linked it with disarma ment in a twopoint slate of ac tion HE SPOKE over a nationwid radio hookup from Alma Ata cap ital of the virgin lands Republi of Kazakhstan which is observin its 40th anniversary Last Wednesday he told Kremlin rally Russia will sign separate peace treaty with Eas Germany at the end of the year if the West continues refusal t sign one with both Germanys The Soviet leader took note o food shortages troubling his n tion then told of sweeping plan to boost production Khrushchev made only brie references to foreign policy ma ters The German and disarma ment problemshe said must b settled in order to puFarTeridt the remnants of the Second Worl War and to settle on this basi the question of Berlin THE POSITION Of the Sovie government on these question was set forth in my recent radii and television speech and in speech at the Kremlin le said I do not believe there is a need to repeat this position lere I shall only say that to our mind the position is a firm wel substantiated position and we ntend to stick firmly to t h i position Khrushchev also put in a plug or 60day hybrid corn grown in he United States I HAD A talk recently he aid with the United States of Americas secretary of state Mr Rusk He told me that the American agronomists have xeated a variety of corn which eaches maturity in a period of fl days If the American agronomists lave really achieved such i uccess we can only congratu ate on this If it is profitable for the United States of America to ave such varieties of corn il s certainly profitable for us to ave such varieties in our coun ry SLATED TO RISE ABOVE Ancient temple of Abu Simbil entrance shown above will be jacked lip to safety from Nile waters that will rise behind the Aswan high dam according to plan approved by United Arab Republic A team of Italian engineers proposes that Fhototax the massive stone structures be lifted 186 feet with 300 hydraulic jacks to a safe spot on the granite hills of the Niles eastern bank Cost of the project is estimated at million Temple located more than 900 miles up the Nile was built about 1265 B C HAS CAMEL WOULD LIKE TO TRAVEL Bashir Ahmad the Pak istani camel driver invited to visit the United States by Vice President Lyn don Johnson poses with three of his five children in Karachi Ahmad who lives in a tumbledown hut and never Photofax has owned a pair of shoes received the invitation during a roadside encounter the Vice President on his recent tour The camel driver would like to make the trip but wonders who will feed his camel and family if he goes President may invoke TH law in maritime walkout WASHINGTON President Kennedy Saturday ordered a government study of effects of the maritime strike to help him decide on Monday whether to invoke the TaftHartley law The study was announced by Secretary of Labor Arthur J Goldberg after conferring with Kennedy in person at the White House and later by telephone Goldberg fold reporters he had been put in charge of a survey to be made by all gov ernment agencies over the weekend on the gravity of the shipping tieup which is now in its ninth day The labor secretary said that if the survey shows the nation al health and safety is in peril the administration will have no hesitancy in seeking an 80day court injunction under the Taft Hartley law to halt the crippling walkout Whether we like the law or not this is our plain duty Gold berg said The last time the TH law was invoked was by former Presi dent Dwight D Eisenhower in 1959 to end the 116day steel strike On the inside Clear Lake News Page 3 Church News 45 Mason City News 67 Latest 7 Society News 8 Sports 910 North Iowa News 10 Editorials 11 Comics 12 Business News 1314 SMOKERS ALERTED LOS ANGELES rn California courts mindful f the tinderdry conditions in ie area are getting tough on igarette throwers Radio an ouncer Kenneth E Graue outh Pasadena Friday was ned for tossing a lighted igarette out his car window SAME Safety Blick rial Deatk to Pait 21 N ews in a nutshell FROM OUR WIRE SERVICES Antimolasses deal WASHINGTON The U S government has made a deal to keep millions of dollars from flowing into Fidel Castros Cuba for molasses Publicker Chemical Corp New Orleans will stop importing Cuban molasses in turn the Agriculture Department will sell to Publicker at a loss 14 million bushels of surplus corn to be made into industrial alcohol Loos prince agrees ZURICH Switzerland Prince Souvanna Phouma has informally agreed to Cambodias major ityrule proposal for threepower truce teams in divided Laos A Cambodian spokesman said the neu tralist rebel prince generally expected to head Laos future coalition government would back the Cam bodian plan when it is presented to the 14nation con ference on Laos in Geneva Three miners trapped FORK MOUNTAIN Tenn Rescue workers dug furiously through a wall of stone and coal in the slim hope they could save at least one of three men trapped in a narrow shaft Five miners including one whose arm was cut off with a hacksaw to free him from a boulder werte hauled out a few hours after the cAvein 744 riders now Arrested JACKSON Miss One month ago the first wave of freedom riders rolled into Jackson Since then Jackson police have arrested 144 Negroes and whites who challenged segregation practices Crisis to g row worse WASHINGTON United States Friday struck a firm jut not belligerent note in tha growing crisis over Berlin avoiding any show of militarj preparations In the background U S British French and West Ger man diplomats sought agree ment on how best to meet the hreat raised by Soviet Premier Shrushchev to sign a peace xeaty with East Germany by he end of the year Coming away from a con ference with President Kennedy and top level officials Friday Secretary of Defense Robert S McNamara told newsmen there are no plans at this time to strengthen the 5000man US garrison in Berlin or to increase its firepower McNAMARA also said have no immediate plans for in creasing the forces in Europe adding I dont mean we wont Itsim ply mean we dont have any plans at the moment for doing so in the near future As a general statement Mc Namara declared We are tak ing a firm but I believe not a belligerent attitude in support ing our position in Berlin and rights and freedoms of the people living in Western Ber Saying I do not want to make inflammatory remarks the Pentagon chief took firm issue with Russian claims that the Soviet JJnions power is in ex cess of ours Reporters saw significance in McNamaras use of qualifying terms such as at this time and immediate in saying here are no plans to bolster US armed might in Europe SOURCES HERE and in Lon don reported the Atlantic Alli ances conventional forces in Europe are likely to be rein forced quietly The main US defense bul wark in Europe comprises five jattleready Army divisions hree of them infantry and two armored They are deployed in West Germany close to the Iron Curtain Air Force fighters and ombers also are arrayed with n striking distance of the Ber in area In the light of talk about pos ible buildups in Europe there also could be significance in VIcNamaras disclosure that he may find it necessary to isit NATO headquarters to dis uss certain NATO questions his summer That trip he aid is not a firm project at he present time Photofax WHERE only six but his curiosity and advsntur ous spirit beckon strongly Pat Saito climbed as high as could inside the garage at his parents home in Los and got stuck Police had to called to free the lad from his iteel and wooden prison AKWfe waiting to be rescued he if comforted by his mother I   

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