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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: October 13, 1960 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 13, 1960, Mason City, Iowa                             North Iowas Daily Ne Edittd for CITY bLOBE The newspaper that makes all North lowans neighbors H0ME IDITION V6L W Awoelited Prtu utd CnitwJ Prww latoraatlON Uut Wlnw MASON CITY IOWA 13 I960 7cm Copy Paper of Four No 4 WHAT A CHORE BRIGHT IDEA THREE GOOD FRIENDS PITCH IN A NEAT PILE FALLING LEAVES EVERYTHINGS A MESS AGAIN FALL FUN WITH PEGGY AND PLAYMATES Peggy Songer 8 daughter of Mr and Mrs James Songer 554 6th SE has a prob lem Her assignment is to rake the leaves But taking a cue from Tom Sawyer she calls in three friends to help They are Patty until the pile gets big and the girls start throwing em around Rice 9 holding daughter of Mr and Mrs Louis Rice 815 The leaves again wind up helterskelter but it surely was fun GlobeGazette photos by Jo Moore Connecticut SE Renee Cottrell 8 pony daughter of Mr and Mrs Weston Cottrell 625 6th SE and Becky Loots 8 daughter of the Rev and Mrs Donald Loots 323 Maryland SE All goes fine Kennedy clings to thin lead Poll reveals virtual tie By KENNETH FINK Princeton Research Service PRINCETON N J If the presidential election was helc in the nation today between the KennedyJohnson and the NixonLodge tickets the results would be very close judging from the findings of a survey completed within the last 10 days Kennedy holds a very slight negligible lead over Nixon THIS IS THE way the poll sters see it at this time Kennedy 501 Nixon 495 Undecided 04 The above figures apply to the popular vote only not to elec toral votes It must be kept in mind that public opinion samplings are normally subject to a margin of deviation of approximately four per cent when the findings are at or near the 50 per cent mark way they are today It must also be very definitely understood that todays findings reflect opinion as of last week and that changes can and may take place over the coming 26 days FOR THIS REASON reporters will be sounding sentiment on the two tickets until the Satur day evening before election day and the latest survey findings will be reported in this newspa per as fast as they are tabu lated Trained thoroughly experi enced reporters put the question to a representative crosssection in certain key areas whose past voting behavior has been care fully studied and weighed in relation to the nations vote It is as a result of these methods that Princeton Research Service has never been wrong on a pres idential forecast either on a na tional or state level since it be gan operations on April 1 1947 7 injured in 3rd NY blast NEW YORK MVA homemade bomb exploded Wednesday in the Times Square subway in juring seven persons It was the third explosion of the kind in midtown in 11 days the sec ond in Times Square The latest blast occurred in a doityourself p h o t o g r aphic booth near the shuttle line that links Times Square and Grand Central Terminal Two sootcovered youths were seen dashing from the booth but pursuing motormen lost them in the smoke and con fusion Two boys also were seen dashing from an explosion outside the New York Public Library last Sunday Yank among those executed in Cuba young American adventurer and 12 Cubans were executed Thurs day for plotting to overthrow Prime Minister Fidel Castro The American first to be executed by the Castro re gime was Anthony Zarba Somerville Mass He went before a firing squad in San tiago with seven Cuban com panions Havana radio sta tions reported five other Cu bans were executed in Santa Clara A second American Rich ard Pecoraro Staten Island NY was sentenced to 20 years at hard labor as a Cas tro enemy The execution of Zarba ig nored a personal appeal from US Ambassador Philip Bon sal for clemency or at least a stay of execution Bonsais plea was not even acknow ledged or answered and there was no indication it was even forwarded to the army tri bunal which condemned the 27yearold Zarba Zarbo and his companions had been convicted only hours before by a revolutionary court of staging a Castro style invasion to set up a guerrilla front in Cuba The eight prisoners were led before four different fir ing squads near Santiago two at a time The reports of the first rifles cracked down the San Juan Valley firing range at am Zarba a 27yearold adven Russ still like U S products NEW YORK Pre mier Khrushchev and his party evidently like American prod ucts e v e n if they dont like Americans As the group prepared to leave for home great numbers of crates cartons and other items of baggage were carried out of the Russian Park Avenue leadquarters and loaded into trucks and other vehicles Among other things news men could see automobile tires antifreeze and auto batteries LITTLE DIES LOS ANGELES J attle 66 vice president of the Association of American Rail roads and former speaker of the California State Assembly died Wednesday ANTHONY ZARBA ARTIST DIES MINEOLA NY UPI Lynn Bogue Hunt 82 Wildlife illustrator and staff artist for the A m e r i c a n Museum of Natural History died Wednes day N ews m a nutshell FROM OUR WIRE SERVICES COVENTRY England Anti American hecklers badgered U S Air Force Gen Lauris Nor stad repeatedly drowning out his Columbus night speech The Allied supreme commander in Europe was the target of a demonstration apparently or ganized by the leftwing isolationists who rammed a scrap the bomb and quit NATO resolution through the recent laborite convention MANILA Philippines The Philippine govern ment scored a major blow in its battle against Com munist Huk forces by capturing their No 2 man Casto Alejandrino known as the rebels military brain MOSCOW The Soviet Union announced its industrial production quota for the first nine months of 1960 was overfulfilled by three per cent Tass said figures showed production through September was 103 per cent of the planned target LEOPOLDVILLE Congo The Congolese army will not try to take by force deposed Premier Pa trice Lumumba from United Nations troops guard ing him Congolese strongman Col Joseph Mobutu said turer who landed on the north east coast of Cuba with a small party of invaders last week was the first US citi zen to die before a Castro firing squad Another Ameri can Ala Robert Nye Whiting Ind was given a death sen tence last year for plotting to kill Castro but the sen tence was suspended and he was expelled from the coun try Zarba told the court during his oneday trial here that he was a member of the boat crew that landed the invad ers He said he was sorry he took part and that he tried to leave the expedtion in the Bahamas He said the party sailed from Miami Fla where he has a wife and child Wanted to make a lot of money BOSTON UPI The exwife of Anthony Zarba who was ex ecuted in Cuba said Thursday he plotted to overthrow the Cuban government and make a lot of money Mary Ann Zarba Miami re vealed They were planning on going over there and starting guerrilla warfare for some time she said I dont know what they were planning this time except that they wanted to overthrow the Cuban govern ment I guess Im very sorry it all hap pened and hes been talking about it for two and a half years about two years saying that if he succeeds in all this hed make a lot of money she said If not it was a good try I mean he had a lot of friends involved Cubans that he felt sorry for and that he wanted to help them but still it was mosj ly money involved so he knew what he was doing she said Asylum granted to Russian seaman NEW YORK Jaanimets 29 a seaman who fled Communism from Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchevs ship Baltika Wednesday was granted political asylum in the United States He immediately went into hiding for fear of So viet attempts to return him be hind the Iron Curtain THE RICHT MAN NEW YORK UPI The man chosen by the American Broadcasting Corp to coordi nate Thursdays television de hate between Sen John Ken nedy and Vice President Nixon was Marshall Diskin whose regular job is director ofthe Saturday night fights for the network Clash seen i by Kennedy By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Vice President Richard M Nixon and Sen John F Kennedy clash again Thursday night a continent apart in their third televisionradio debate on presi dential campaign issues The split screen hour long transcontinental show starting at pm will find the GOP standard bearer Nixon in an American Broadcasting Co Hollywood studio and the Demo cratic aspirant Kennedy in an ABC studio in New York City THE CANDIDATES will ap pear in identical TV studio set tings A combination podium and desk will allow each man to stand or sit as he chooses Studio lighting will be duplicated at each end of the network and both candidates have been asked to wear the same shade of at tire In the two previous debates the candidates have faced each other in the same studio The first was handled by CBS from Chicago the second by NBC in Washington CAMPAIGN TOURS prevent them from debating facetoface this lime The debate likely will be a lively one The last one stirred up a hassle on the position of the US regarding the National istheld islands of Quemoy and Matsu off the shore of China Kennedy claims Nixons atti tude of defending these tiny islets would give the nation trigger happy leadership Nixon in turn charges that Kennedys idea of not defending them means another retreat in the face of communism Infant dies in Oelwein crash OELWEIN UPI A 6 month old baby was killed Thursday when the car her mother was driving crashed headon into another vehicle on county road about 7 miles northwest of here The victim was Brenda Lee Eleinking daughter of Mr and Mrs Bernard Reinking West gate Two other Reinking chil dren with their mother Jeffrey 3 and Joanne Marie 2 were not injured Authorities said the infants mother Irene 22 the driver was in fair condition in a Sum ner hospital Also hospitalized was the driver of the other car Roger Decker 18 Westgate On the inside 4 Society News 547 Clear Lake News 11 MatonCity News1415 Latest Market 15 1MI North Iowa News19 U S endorses a full debate on colonialism Rejects apology demand UNITED NATIONS NY UP Premier Khrushchev Thursday denounced US spy jlane flights as actually a step jeyond the brink of war He demanded a US apology be fore the General Assembly Khrushchev was very calm as he read the text of his speech When U S Ambassador James J Wadsworth rejected the apology demand Khrush chev sat quietly neither ap plauding nor tablethumping WADSWORTH TOLD the as sembly the United State did not object to UN consideration of he Russian aggression item but would vote against debating it directly in the assembly He re called that Russia vetoed an impartial investigation and said this made it all the more de sirable for the full facts to be brought out clearly in the first political committee Khrushchev said if the US government will not wish to show good will and will not con demn the practice of sending its spy planes to the Sovie Union and other countries the United Nations should in al strictness condemn such ag gressive actions on the part of one of the biggest powers against other countries Such acts he said could have the most grave consequences for world peace SUCH A POLICY of the USA said Khrushchev should be condemned and stopped so that such provoc ative incidents would not lead he world to the brink of war The American aggressive flights are actually a step beyond this brink Khrushchev said US flights against Russia violated the sovereignty of such countries as Afghanistan Australia Norway Pakistan and Turkey Then he told the assembly I ask you to bear in mind that this is not a complaint of he Soviet Union No we do not complain The Soviet Union is strong enough to unilaterally defend the interests of its country North Iowa SHOWERS Scattered show ers and thunderstorms Thurs day night lows in low 50s Partly cloudy scattered show ers and thunderstorms and cooler Friday highs 6872 Iowa Partly cloudy scattered s h o w e rs or thunderstorms Thursday night and in the east and south Friday Cool er northwest and extreme west Thursday night lows 40s northwest to lower 60s south east Cooler west and north Friday highs 60s northxvest to upper 70s southeast Further outlook Partly cloudy with scattered and turning cooler Saturday Minnesota Partly cloudy cooler Highs Friday 5565 GlobeGazette weather data up to 8 am Thursday Maximum Minimum At 8 am Precipitation YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum 79 52 57 03 50 27 Thompson youth victim of tractor mishap Olson 19 son of the Engel Olsons was killed Thursday morning in a tractor accident on the family lome farm south of here He was thrown from the trac er when it hit a bole as he was plowing He was killed in stantly w h e n a rear tractor wheel ran over him Surviving him are his par ents and five brothers Vernon in Thompson Gary in the Army at Carleton Mich and Merle Sheryl and Terry at home Funeral arrangements are not complete CHECKUP FOR BURR HOLLYWOOD Ray m o n d Burr 43 televisions Perry Mason is in Cedars of Lebanon Hospital for what his physician termed a checkup and diagnostic tests Calm is restored at UN UNITED NATIONS N Y MS The United States agreed Thursday to full UN Assembly debate of a Soviet proposal for ireedom for all colonial areas This assured its overwhelming approval The U S move obviously de prived the Soviet resolution of much of its propaganda impact and arrayed the Americans with new African and other emerging nations on the question of end ing colonialism U S delegate Francis 0 Wil cox announced the U S stand to the Assembly after one of the Soviet Unions j clo s e st sup1 porters in Af rica the presi dent of Guinea chided t h e Com munists for their dem o n s t r ations W e d n e sday night which broke up a 1 UN session in wild disorder BOLAND Soviet Premier Khrushchev whose shoewaving demonstra tion played a large part in Wed nesday nights turmoil joined in the applause for the Ameri can announcement KHRUSHCHEV quickly took the floor under the right of re ply and expressed pleasure at the U S decision But he ac cused the United States of plot ting to wiggle its way out of the colonial question by seeking later to water the resolution down into something innocuous But Khrushchev indicated that the United States by its accept ance of the colonial question had extended a hand to him I accept this hand I shake it I clasp it Khrushchev said The session began with a spon taneous tribute to President Frederick H B o 1 a n d who abruptly and angrily ended the LJ N session Wednesday night The session broke up in dis order after a series of Com munist insults and repeated in terruptions highlighted by the astonishing spectacle of Khrush chev banging his desk with one of his shoes BOLAND AN Irishman used a new gavel borrowed from the Security Council to open Thurs days session He broke a gavel Wednesday night when he slammed it down to bring the tumultuous session to an abrupt end The assembly was delayed Wednesday 1 Three Khrushchev trips to the rostrum to speak during one of which he called Sen Lorenzo Sumulong a Philippine delegate this jerk or this joker and a stooge or boot licker 2 Communist fury that ex ploded when Sumulong speak ing on the question of colonial ism said the debate should be expanded to include nations of Eastern Europe that have been deprived of their freedom by the Russians 3 Repeated and stormy inter ruptions by Romanian delegate Eduard Mezincescu and Khrush chev on what they called points of order They used the device accuse Boland of partiality toward West in his rulings AP Photoiax A BIG YOUNG FAMILY Six children and the oldest just Sy2 Thats the family of Mr and Mrs Raymond Watkins Akron Ohio Newcomers are triplets Johanna Judith Joseph Getting a close look are Mrs Watkins andolder sisters from left De borah 15 months Jacqueline and Kathleen The father is a plumber SAME DATImtSOf   

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