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Mason City Globe Gazette: Friday, June 3, 1960 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - June 3, 1960, Mason City, Iowa                             North Iowas Daily Newspaper Edited for the Horns MASON GITY GLOBEGAZETTE The VOL98 Associated Press and United Press International FnO Lease Wires newspaper that makes all North lowans neighbors MASON CITY IOWA FRIDAY JUNE 3 1960 7o Cop Paper rf Two No 292 Birthday of church on Sunday Some grounds for optimism on future unity By LOUIS CASSELS United Press Internationa This Sunday Christians will celebrate the 1930th anniversary of the birthday of the church The observance is known as Pentecost from a Greek word meaning 50 days It commemor ates the occasion 50 days after Christs Resurrection when the Apostles received the gift of the Holy Spirit and went forth to be gin the bold preaching missions which carried the gospel into every corner of the Roman Em pire within a comparatively few years Because it recalls an era when all Christians were of one mind and one spirit Pentecost is a traditional time for taking stock of the present divided state of the church and of the efforts that are being made to restore its unity Those who engage in such a stocktaking this weekend will find grounds for pessimism or optimism depending on h o w long a view they take THE SHORTRANGE outlook Christian unity is pretty bleak It is now clear for example that the ecumenical council which will convene in Rome in early 1962 will be an allCatholic affair with no Protestant or Eastern Orthodox participation If Pope John XXIII hoped that the council would lead to Cath olicOrthodox reunion as he ap parently did when he issued the call he has learned that the hope was premature The issue of papal authority which has divided Catholic and Orthodox churches for nearly a thousand years is still so touchy that neither side can think of a for mula which would permit Ortho dox bishops to sit in a council summoned by the Pope Within the Protestant branch of the Christian family the drive for reunion is going for ward but in low gear During the past year denominational mergers have brought the Uni tarians and Universalists to gether and have welded three Lutheran bodies into one Four other Lutheran groups are ten tatively set to unite in 1962 The Methodist church and the United Evangelical Brethren seem to be headed for early consolida tion Several other negotiations are in progress but mostly they are tentative and exploratory and no one looks for dramatic re sults any time soon THIS RECORD is not very encouraging to idealists who are impatient for immediate results But the picture looks brighter when you view it from the long perspective of history Then you are struck not by the snails pace of the Christian unity movement but by the fact that there is such a movement For the first time since the Re formation four centuries ago Christians are more concerned with drawing together than with pulling apart They have recog nized that their divisions are a scandal to man and an offense to God and they are beginning to recognize that neither side is entirely to blame for the situa tion The most fashionable word in church circles these days i dialogue It simply means that Catholics and Protestants are talking to one another in civil tones trying to understand their differences So far the dialogue has been confined most ly to scholars and theologians and it has been concerned with clarifying rather than settling disputes But both sides are try ing earnestly to expand and deepen the process of mutual re acquaintance THERE IS another littlepub licized trend in Catholic Prot estant relations and in the long run it may prove to be the most important of all It started with a suggestion by Dr Oscar Cullman famous Swiss Protestant theologian He pointed out that Jesus did not order His followers to agree on everything but he did explicitly command them to love onr an other Dr Cullman proposed that Protestants undertake specific acts of kindness and charity toward Catholics and vice versa Some European churches have put the plan into practice TWO Viv ian Leigh star of the Broadway show Duel of An gels and Ann Bancroft star of The Miracle Worker give opposing views on the current actors strike that has closed all theaters Miss Leigh thinks the walkout is unnecessary Miss Bancroft says Miss Leigh is misin formed stage in blackout US overseas provoke Khrushchev New effort to discredit Ike MOSCOW UP Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev renewing his efforts to discredit President Eisenhower said Friday it is dangerous to have such a man heading a great nation And he indicated the Soviet Union could have little confi dence in Richard M Nixon as a working partner of the Soviet Khrushchev said he did not want to interfere in the forth coming presidential election in the United States But he added jestingly It is said in America that if the Russians favor a candidate fie issure to lose the election In that case we favor Nixon The Premier declared the Eis enhower presidency is a dark period in history with the Pres ident lacking in will power HE PICTURED whom he met and praised last fall in the United virtually a stooge for John Fos ter Dulles at the 1955 summit meeting Then the Premier in directly continued his recent criticism of Vice President Nixon by saying NEW YORK Broad way stage is blacked out for the first time in 41 years a victim of a bitter dispute between ac tors and producers In the midtown theatrical dis trict Thursday night as the curtain time came and went there were no blazing lights on theater marquees no surging crowds of pedestrians no swarms of taxicabs jockeying to get their fares to the play houses THERE WILL be absolutely no shows until there is an agree ment said producer Alexander H Cohen speaking for the New York League of Theaters Actors equity is on strike he added It looks like a long one to me Equity claims it is a lockout not a strike The union climaxed its pensionwage battle with pro ducers on Wednesday night when it called the cast of The Tenth Man to a meeting at union headquarters just before curtain time THE PRODUCERS in line with their warning against hit run tactics by Equity shut all 22 Broadway shows The movie houses in the Broadway show area are not af fected by the shutdown Also un affected are current road shows summer theaters 21 offBroad way playhouses and the City Center Theater which has a separate contract with Equity The offBroadway playhouses expect to reap a harvest from the situation We were not so badly off in Dulles time because he did so foolish things it made it easier for us F r o m that point of view I suppose that Nixon is the best choice for us for US Of course it would be better for us if we had a wise partner but if not that is the American peoples business and they will be the ones to suffer We got a laugh with this re mark When the President is no longer President the best job we could offer him here would be as head of a childrens home We are sure he would not harm children BUT TO HAVE such a man as the head of a great nation is dangerous he added when the laughter died down President Eisenhower is completely lacking in will power he said but that does not excuse him for not ex ercising authority over such men as Nixon and Secretary of State Christian A Herter The Premier declared these two are leading the United States along a path which could bring a new war Khrushchev said that at the 1955 summit conference in Gen eva the late Secretary of State Dulles sat on Eisenhowers right T H E ONLY THING the President would do was to take notes from Dulles hastily scrib bled and without even pretend ing would glimpse at them Khrushchev said meaning Dulles was telling the President what to say WASHINGTON The White House Friday branded as com pletely untrue Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchevs statement that President Eisenhower fears and opposes the unification of Germany Mrs Anne Wheaton associ ate press secretary told report ers the President was informed of Khrushchevs statement on Germany and of the Soviet leaders slurs on the President himself THERE WILL be no com ment she said on Khrushchevs statements at a Kremlin news conference that Eisenhower i completely lacking in will power and that it is danger ous for him to head a great He would openly avert his arrested a house painter Fri eyes to what was written and jay after a threehour chase wait for the next note on the through alleys and up trees next question I was horrified charged him with having at On the inside self Editorials CubGazette Society News Clear Lake News Sports North Iowa News Latest Markets Mason City News North Iowa Features Comics Page 4 5 6 10 1112 13 14 1415 16 17 TV Guide Pullout Section at the spectacle and said to u wives J1 are we going German Chancellor Konrad Ad enauer in similar terms He said Adenauer lost his reason along time ago and is fit only PLAN TOUR LONDON UP Buckingham Palace Friday announced that Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip will visit India in 1961 Premiers statement not true nation Khrushchev said Eisenhower told him personally that he Ei senhower was unwilling to see Germany reunified because the United States fears a reunified Germany THERE WAS NO immediate White House comment on Khrushchevs further statement that he had authorized the use of nuclear warheads on rockets which would be aimed at any foreign bases from which fur ther spy flights might be launched over Russia But Mrs Wheaton reminded reporters The State Depart ment has said we will stand firmly by our Allies Khrushchevs latest disarma ment plan is seen by officials here as a definite Soviet bid to split the Western powers Man nabbed after he squeezed 11 lemons SAN FRANCISCO having They also said he used four names Frank v o o J1C UOCU J V U J lid 111 tO i 1 CAJUa Khrushchev referred to West Gratto in jail said Im a vic of meeting women who turned out to be no good They all were lemons HITLERS SISTER DIES BERCHTESGARDEN G e r many W Paula Hitler sister of Adolph Hitler died Wednes day according to police She was 64 She preferred to be called Paula Wolf 4 per cent wage increase granted to rail engineers CHICAGO A sixman arbitration board Friday awarded a 4 per cent wage in crease in two steps to 40000 engineers on US railroads The carriers lost their bid for a wage cut of 15 cents an hour The arbitration award is ex pected to set a pattern for settling wage disputes with 760000 more workers in the operating end of the industry These include firemen train men conductors brakemen and swifchmen with whom the railroads have been un able to reach agreement The decision came nearly two months after the board began hearings to decide the engineers demand for a wags boost and the carriers re quest for a pay cut The board awarded a 2 per cent pay increase effective July 1 and an additional 2 per cent effective March 1 1961 Under the ruling all fringe benefits in effect under an earlier agreement remain in force The cost of living al lowance in effect May to be part of the ex isting rates of pay Outlines disarm icy Old stand amplified AP Photofax CAUGHT IN THE SQUEEZE A rioting is a continuation of Commumst Tokyo policeman winces from the stress inspired unrest against the USJapan of a crush that developed on the grounds security pact and the visit of President of Prime Minister Kishis residence The Eisenhower later this month ews in a utshell FEOM OUR WIRE SERVICES MOSCOW Premier Khrushchev has accepted an invitation to visit Cuba at a date to be agreed upon later DUSSELDORF Ger many Walther Funk 69 who ran Hitlers war economy and served as president of the Nazi Eeichsbank died Friday MACKINAC ISLAND Mich Endorsement by Gov Williams virtually assured Sen John Ken nedy of bagging Michi gans 51 votes for the Democratic presidential nomination WASHINGTON Canadas prime minister John G Diefenbaker ar rived Friday for a 21 hour state visit WASHINGTON House officials indicate they may call in auditors to check questioned ex pense accounts of con gressmen accused of hav ing spent public funds in bars and nightclubs and on vacation cruises LOS ANGELES A survey shows 26 per cent of students in U S high schools are regular smok ers and nearly three times that number have experimented with smok ing The trend is toward boys and girls to start smoking at a younger age even while in grade school SAME IOWA HAKKIV OEPARTMKNT FIGURES Black Meani Traffic Death In Fait 21 Heart The weather North Iowa Fair Friday night and Saturday Lows Friday night in lower 50s Highs Sat urday 7682 Iowa Mostly fair through Sat urday Lows Friday night in the 50s Highs Saturday 7684 Further Partly cloudy with little temperature change Sunday Fiveday Iowa Temperatures will average slightly below normal north to near normal south Saturday through next Wednesday Afternoon MOSCOW W Soviet Pre mier Nikita Khrushchev renew ing his demand for the United States to abandon its overseas military bases said Friday that countries playing host to U S forces would be the first ones hit if war breaks out He made the statement at a Kremlin news conference called to give details of a revised ver sion of his general and com plete disarmament plan un veiled at the United Nations last year Liquidation of U S bases abroad has been a major objec tive of Soviet foreign policy for years KHRUSHCHEV SAID his rock et troop commander now has authority to mount a nuclear attack against the bases if new spy plane flights over the So viet Union take off from them In addition to reshuffling pri orities in his disarmament plan he included a new provision destruction of the rockets sub marines airplanes and other means for delivering nuclear weapons in an attack This plan was first advanced by France If the cold war becomes hot Khrushchev said the will be from the mid 70s in blow will be struck against north to near 80 degrees in theithose countries which play host south Overnight lows will bejto U S bases from the lower 50s in the sovict Defense Minister Ro north to the mid 50s in thejfljon disclosed lion south Temperatures will tnat Soviet rocket crews above normal Minnesota Fair and warm Highs Saturday in 80s GlobeGazette weather data up to 8 a m Friday Maximum Minimum 84 47 WASHINGTON UPI The House Ways and Means com mittee shelving more far reaching proposals Friday ap have been ordered to fire at any foreign base from which fur ther spy flights are launched over the Soviet Union Khrushchev said Marshal M I Nedelin commander of So viet rocket troops had been given the authority to use nu clear warheads in the rockets WESTERNERS HERE wera shocked by this In the United States only the President has the authority to launch a nuclear attack Discussing a detailed new So viet disarmament proposal made tf foj public Thursday night Khrush The measure would offer fedchev said aU types of carriers of nuclear weapons would constitute a firm guar eral grants to states willing pay part of the costs of hospital reaching proposals Jrioay ap n nursing home and other antee against surprise attacks proved a limited program of the nrevention of which mnri oai meflifal care for persons over governmentfinanced medical care for about 1500000 needy ithere has been so much talk in old people The committee climaxed most three months of closed D 65 who are needy but United statcs enough to qualify for public re Khrushchev in effect said that after disarmament was accom Foranc rjR i said plished the Soviet Union would f Saf the House probablyJoin in plan of rival proposals or orj labor and the Eisenhower ad ministration These plans would leave it basis it will be up to benefit some 12000000 elderly j the Senate to expand the Icgis from jaera surveillance such will consider the bill on a no president Eisenhower has VPT adamendment t a k e it or persons lation as rec ommended When disarmament meas ures are implemented he de clared there will hardly be any objections to flying over the territories of countries with the object of photographing any points from any altitude For then no one could use the data to the detriment of the j security of any state Eisenhower however mended international aerial veillance of all countries to vent surprise attack before dis armament Boy 9 survives 15 days in woods FLIN FLON Man HELENS HERO Helen a baby gorilla just ar rived at Chicagos Lincoln Park zoo appears to be inspired by the sight of a bust of Bushman a riant gorilla which was one of the zoos bestknown said 9yearold Walter animals until he died in 1951 Helen is held by Dr jSrdor to his mother at the Flin I OI n i n t hel icopter Thursday plucked a starving nearly incoherent little from beside the burned I wreckage of a piano where he had spent 15 lonely fearridden days in the rugged bush of jnorthwest of Manitoba Later AP Photofax the helicopter and its rescue crew returned to collect the bodies of the childs father and a friend who died in the crash Gee I thought youd never Marlin Perkins zoo director Flon hospital   

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