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Mason City Globe Gazette: Wednesday, June 1, 1960 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - June 1, 1960, Mason City, Iowa                             North Iowas Daily Newspaper Edited for Home MASON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE VOL 98 Associated Press and United Press International Fun Lease Wires The newspaper that makes all North lowans neighbors MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY JUNE 1 1960 7c a Copy Paper Consists of Four One No 200 Traffic law violators under air surveillance havent a chance By WILLIAM EBERLINE DBS MOINES you ever stand and look down on a boys electric train layout Thats about what the Iowa countryside looks like from 2500 to 3000 feet in the air And way up there is the place to go if youre looking for traffic ly of certain types Its an Iowa Highway Patrol axiom that one airplane is worth 10 patrol cars in spot ting traffic law violations for the protection of the motoring public Thats why on any day when the weather is clear the patrols four airplanes spend hours in the sky study ing traffic on the roads below Your inquiring reporter wanted to see for himself how the system works He went along on a Memorial Day flight in a patrol plane a Cessna 175 At the controls was Patrolman Dan veteran pilot of World War II who has been flying for the patrol for about four years Fosters Memorial Day as signment was to check traffic south of Osceola on Highway 69 At the north edge of Osceola you see the first violation of the car traveling about 50 miles an hour going through a stop sign without even slowing down You cant nail this one because the car gets lost from sight under the trees lining the towns streets Over Osceola Foster estab lishes radio contact with high way patrol cars Then he heads south to make pass aft er pass over Highway 69 What youre looking for is any type of traffic passing on a yellow line speeding a truck following an other truck too closely the er ratic driving that may denote a drunk and so on This is one of the busiest jobs in the patrol says Fos ter and you see what he means as you watch him work You fly along the highway eyes riveted on the road be low Its strictly flapsdown flying You hold your speed to 80 miles an hour or less in work like this A tancolored car pulls out to go around an automobile pulling a house trailer Foster reaches for the radio A car just made an illegal pass around a house trailer taking about 200 feet of yellow line he tells his fellow patrol men waiting up the highway Its sort of tancolored The black one with the red up holstery ahead of it clipped the yellow line too but not too much You keep your eye on the two culprit cars Then you see a patrolman on the road motioning the drivers to pull over The driver of the black car will get a warning ticket Foster explains The tan one took a lot of yellow line so hell be arrested Foster enters the informa tion on a log sheet kept in case he has to appear in court As you take another swing over the same yellow line you realize it marks not only a long curve but a fairly steep hill Look at that1 exclaims Foster and you see a blue car sailing around two other ve hicles The line is yellow all the 300 feet or more Foster quickly reports it and a few minutes later you see a patrol car pull the blue one to the curb in the outskirts of Osccola Its easy to figure how much of a yellow line a driver takes in an illegal pass Foster says You measure by the center stripe of the road It is marked by 20foot white lines inter spersed with 20 feet of un marked highway Count the lines and spaces a car goes by and you have the answer Now you go to a marked stretch of highway to make some speed checks with a stop watch The traffic isnt moving very fast today Foster com ments after several checks fact the people seem to be doing a pretty good job of driv ing on the whole I think Ill sit down for a bite to eat says Foster and suddenly you realize its 6 pm and you are tired You head for the airport in Des Moines thinking of home and supper Not Foster though Hes planning to eat then hit the air again as long as daylight lasts For a highway patrol pilot theres no letup in the holiday war on bad driving until it gets too dark to see GI Bill has 15th birthday By JAMES MORISSEAU New Yorjc Herald Tribune News Service NEW YORK The current commencement ceremonies ai colleges and universities across the country will mark the 15th anniversary of a phenomenon that nearly revolutionized Amer ican higher education the G I on campus By a very rough estimate some 50000 of the 490000 stu dents who will receive degrees over the next few weeks at tended college under the provi sions of the Korean War G I Bill They represent a vanishing breed of student the relative ly more mature and serious veteran of wartime service in the armed forces who attendee college because the nation felt that education was a legitimate part of a veterans rehabilitation for civilian life THIS IN 1945 was a revolu tionary concept Ever since the Revolutionary War when vet erans got musteringout pay and pensions wer provided for the disabled the United States had followed a tradition of special benefits for veterans But education did not come into the picture until after World War I and then only for the dis abled Nearly 189000 of them benefited under the postwar vo cational rehabilitation program Then in June 1945 Congress adopted Public Law 346 the Servicemens Readjustment Act opened up a whole range of educational opportunity for the returning veteran The GI Bill provided up to four years of education for ev ery one of the millions of World War II veterans They had a choice of institutional onfarm training apprentice or other on thejob training elementary and high school level education or a chance to go to college SINCE THE GI Bill became law the armed forces have dis charged 20 million servicemen Nearly 11 million have received educational benefits and of these one out of every three entered a college or university This massive invasion of the American campus got its real start in the fall of 1946 the be ginning of the first full college year for which the great bulk of World War II veterans could ar range to enroll By the following September one out of every two college students was a veteran and three out of four men stu dents were veterans The educators when they con templated the pospects in 1945 had feared the impending inva sion They were concerned over the possibility that the veteran would not adjust to campus life that he would find it hard to re turn to his studies and in some cases even that he would have an adverse effect on campus morals AS IT TURNED out their fears were unwarranted The veteran not only made a good student he made a postive and lasting impression on Amer ican higher education The postwar phenomenon of the married veteran on campus with his trailer coloniesand washlines full of diapers set the precedent for todays rash of campus marriages The Korean War veteran also has left his mark on the campus Dr Gideonse said But his im pact was not as great primarily because he was younger than his World War II counterpart All training benefits under the Korean GI Bill adopted in August 1952 will end Jan 31 1965 SUBMERSIBLE PALS Basil arid Alvin the baby seals that have be come tame pets of Harry Goodridge Rockport Maine come up for a breath er after a mornings workout in Rock AP Photatax port Harbor Goodridge a skindiver by hobby captured the seals recently and feeds them from a homemade rubber bottle ews in a utshell FEOM CUE WIRE SERVICES WASHINGTON Management and union negotiators blocked a na tionwide Western Union strike by agreeing on a new twoyear contract that would provide a 21 cent per hour increase in wages and benefits NEW YORK Dennis chairman of the Communist party of the United States underwent an operation for lung can cer PARIS Sign in Par is buses As a hygiene measure it is recom mended that passengers do not carry tickets in the mouth WASHINGTON A Western Big Three strat egy meeting was ar ranged following1 the sec ond secret session of the Southeast Asia Treaty Organization PELLA Arend D Lubbers 28 has been named president of Cen tral College here making him the youngest col lege president in Iowa and one of the youngest in the nation He thus follows in the footsteps of his father who served as president from 1935 to 1945 and has been president of Hope Col lege since then NEW YORK Chil dren and sufficient mon ey are the major sources of happiness for Amer icans Debts and insuffi cient housing not enough money in other words are the major reasons for unhappiness These are among the bas ic findings of a mental health inventory North Iowa Scattered showers and thunderstorms Wednes day night lows 5458 Partly cloudy and cooler Thursday highs 7078 Iowa Partly cloudy northwest scattered showers and thun derstorms elsewhere most numerous and intense south portion Wednesday night cool er west and central low 5054 west 5458 east Partly cloudy and cooler Thursday high 68 73 northwest 7378 southeast Further outlook Partly cloudy near normal tempera tures Friday Minnesota Showers cooler Highs Thursday 7080 GlobeGazette weather data up to 8 am Wednesday Maximum 81 Minimum 61 Precipitation Trace PIPEFITTERS WANTED PHILADELPHIA Sewer crawlers The city be gan accepting applications Tues day for sewer crawlers to plug leaks rat holes and the like in the vast Philadelphia sewer system Applicants must be able to fit in an 18inch pipe Rural road lighting to be tested AMES Iowa Highway Commission directed its plan ning division director Carl Schach to prepare standards for a limited program of lighting rural highway intersections Schach told the commission Wednesday that lighting would go far toward reducing acci dents at some intersections The need is especially great he said where a turn is re quired by one of the major movements through the inter section and where this move ment is confined to a compar atively narrow openings beyond the intersection Schach said that automobile headlights of ten do not provide enough side lighting to indicate the proper path for a sharp turn at a high way junction Schach estimated it would cost about per light stand ard to install the lights Schach said he doesnt know exactly how many intersections should be included in the light ing program until he can draw up the plan He added these in tersections undoubtedly will in clude Highways 3 and 69 m Wright County and 18 and both east and west intersec tions in Hancock County Was prepared to meet Ike Mr K aries 9 since Crackdown on solons MOSCOW Pre mier Khrushchev said in a statement published Wednesday that he had been prepared in Paris to meet privately with President Eisenhower before the Summit conference But he said Eisenhower showed no interest in such a meeting Khrushchev said he had told British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan a day before the Summit meeting was to start that I am prepared to meet Eisenhower if he shows inlcresl in such a meeting The Soviet leader repeated his previous stand that it was up to Eisenhower to take the initiative for such a meeting Because of the US U2 spy plane incident Khrushchev said the Soviet the grossly injured not undertake the initiative Khrushchevs statement was published in the government newspaper Izvcstia in reply to a question from one of the pub lications reporters The question was based on a reported statement by Secretary of State Herlcr before the Sen ate Foreign Relations commit tee in which he said he knew of nn cfforl by Khrushchev either direct or indirect to meet with Eisenhower in Paris Charges of abuses denied FROM OUR WIRE SERVICES crackdown on congressmens expense ac counts was ordered Wednesday in the wake of published charges that some lawmakers used pub lie funds for high living on offi cial journeys The House Administration committee agreed at a closec session to reiterate in strongest terms the limitations on what congressmen may and may not charge off to the taxpayers in their travels at home and abroad COMMITTEE Chairman Bur leson DTex announced the action Burleson was one of those named in copyrighted dis patches in the Knight newspa pers charging abuse of congres sional expense accounts Burleson and other congress men available for comment de nied charges in the articles that they had used public money for nightclubbing liquor and vaca tion cruises House Clerk Ralph Roberts ordered a secrecy label applied io the records but Speaker Sam Rayburn personally counter manded him Rayburn tartly told newsmen They will be opened The story said the practices are concentrated in the ex pense accounts of House inves igating committees the very groups which have been busy scrutinizing everybody else But nobody investigates the investi gators IT CITED as an example bills of the Royal Hawaiian Hotel in Honolulu to Rep Oren Harris in which the word food m parentheses was written in after separate charges marked bar Harris is chairman of the Leg islative Oversight subcommittee which recently investigated pay ola practices in the disc jockey Dusiness The story quoted Harris as commenting he does not have the slightest idea who made the food notations after the bar charges on the hotel bill I dont approve of bar pay ments being charged to the government I have ne v e r cnowingly approved a bar charge Harris said On the inside EditorialsPage 4 Society News 1011 Clear Lake News 15 Sports 1718 Comics19 North Iowa News 21 Latest Markets 26 Mason City News 2627 SAME DATE1959271 AP Photofax HURRIED T R I Grace of Monaco hurries up the steps of a Philadelphia hospital to visit her ailing fa ther John B Kelly recover ing from emergency abdomi nal surgery The former screen star hurriedly flew fron Europe after being in formed of her fathers condi tion Didnt know of routes until space agency boss testifies WASHINGTON UP A spokesman for the na tions space agency testified Wednesday that high flying U2 planes have made more than 200 weather flights covering about 264000 miles since 1956 He said his agency did not know just where the planes flew until after the fact These flights have been conducted in the United States western Europe Turkey and Japan Hugh L Dryden deputy for the National i r Aeronautics and Space Admini More surgery tor actor Gary Cooper stration said Dryden in testimony to the Senate Foreign Relations Com HOLLYWOOD VPI pictured the missions as Gary Cooper was recovering information gathering for re Tuesday from a major abdomi nal operation which his doctors said was a success The 58year old Academy Award winner un derwent surgery for removal of part of his bowel The surgery iollowed by five weeks a pros late operation in a Boston hos pital in hospital has asthma attack WASHINGTON UP Eisenhower entered Walter Reed Army Hospital Tuesday for treatment of an attack of acute asthmatic bronchitis the White House announced Wednesday Doctors reported that the First Lady is as comfortable as she can be under the cir cumstances press secretary James C Hagerty told news men He added that she is feel ing better than Tuesday and has very little fever He said Mrs Eisenhower would re main under treatment for a short while presumably only a few days Hagerty said Mrs Eisen hower who will be 64 in No vember has suffered asthma tic bronchial attacks before but none as bad as this one He emphasized however that he was not characterizing this as a serious illness In February t h e White House announced that on ad vice of doctors Mrs Eisen hower would not accompany the President on his good will trip to South America Hager ty told reporters at that time she was not ill but because of the rigors of the trip her physician had advised her not to go The First Lady spent the past weekend in Gettysburg Pa with the President on their farm But her hospitali zation cast further doubt as to whether she would accompany the President on his Far East trip later this month AP Photofax ROTARYS TOP WHEELS Congratulations and best wishes are beinp extended to J Ecld McLaupblin Rails Texas 196061 presidentelect of Rotary In ternational by Harold T Thomas of Auckland New Zealand current president center and Joseph A Abey of Reading Pa presidentelect for 1961152 search work not spying He explained that NASA in doing its job of research on im proving aircraft development and operations arranges t3 put instruments on planes military and commercial He said it has cooperated with foreign gov ernments and airlines by lend ing instrumentation WE HAVE NO detailed knowledge of the flight plans until after the fact The Senate group is making a general quiry into the j summit fiasco including the i downing of a U2 spy plane deep in Russia May 1 and So jviet Premier Xikita Khrush ichevs subse use of the incident as a reason to DRYDEN draw back from meeting with Western heads of state The first U S word on the missing U2 was a statement by NASA that a weather plane based in Turkey was missing Much of the questioning of Dryden centered on why this statement was issued He was questioned behind closed doors but a censored transcript of his testimony was given newsmen Dryden said the Central Intel ligence Agency cleared the substantive facts of the state ment He said that NASA hadnt intended making any statement but had merely planned to an swer reporters questions about the plane BUT HE SAID that it was de cided to issue a statement rather than to have a general j freeforall of questioning by reporters I would like to emphasize that the text of that statement as issued was not cleared with the CIA or anyone else Dryden said although the information Jin it the answers to the ques tions that were contained within it were cleared with the CIA and I am told by them with the State Department Why Dryden was asked did i NASAs statement say that the JU2 planes were being used in j Japan Turkey and California i At this point the testimony was censored heavily Dryden finally replied that it previously had been published that U2 flights were being made from Adana Turkey and Atsugi i Japan Some senators have ques i tinned whether CIA has used to cover up some of its intelligence activities such as jspy plane flights   

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