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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: May 17, 1960 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - May 17, 1960, Mason City, Iowa                             North Iowas Daily Newspaper Edited for the Home MASON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE VOL 98 The Newspaper That Makes All North Iowans Neighbors Associated Press ana United Press International Fan tease Wires MASON CITY IOWA TUESDAY MAY 17 I960 7o a Copy Tbs Consists of Two SectionsSection NO Record of airlines still good By WILLIAM DICKINSON JR GlobeGazette Editorial Research Bureau WASHINGTON Mans in stinctive fear of falling from a great height is something com mercial aviation always has had to combat Air travel is now an everyday method of transportation to large numbers of people Bu fear of getting off the ground is apt to recur whenever a spec tacular plane crash dashe scores of people to death So it is hardly surprising that loss of 147 lives in three airliner accidents in the first quarter of 1960 brought a dip in airline book ings SUCH PUBLIC reaction to ac cidents in air is understand able but actually irrational in light of the facts Many more people were killed in highway accidents over last New Years weekend than were killed in air line crashes in the whole year of 1959 374 deaths in three days on the roads as against 226 in 12 months in the air Yet despite wholesale slaugh ter on the highways hardly any one thinks of giving up travel by auto More than half of all trips of 200 miles or more are made by passenger car on our highly hazardous highways only seven per cent by commercial airliner on our much safer airways Fatalities on scheduled airline flights have been fewer than one per 100 million passengermiles flown in each of the past eight PARTLY CLOUDY V North Iowa Variable cloudiness with scattered showers and thunderstorms moving in Tuesday night and continuing Wednesday Not so cold Tues day night lows 5055 Highs Wednesday 7579 Iowa Variable cloudiness with scattered showers and thun derstorms moving into west portion Tuesday night and spreading over the state Wed nesday Warmer west Tues day night lows 4855 Warmer east Wednesday highs in the 70s Further Outlook A little cooler Thursday with showers east portion Summit tugowar rages Russ still want apo Minnesota Partly cloudy show ers Highs Wednesday in 70s GlobeGazette Weather Data up to 8 am Teusday Maximum 71 Minimum 47 At 8 am 56 Precipitation 12 Mr K in trouble at home By WILLIAM L RYAN years That rate contrasts with a rate of five passenger fatal ities per 100 million passenger miles in 1938 The alltime low rate of 007 passenger fatalities was recorded in 1954 Last year the rate was 068 passenger fa talities per 100 million passen germiles None of the fatalities occurred on the new fastflying turbojet pure jet transports Accidents like the midair dis integration of a turboprop Elec tra over Indiana last March with a loss of 63 lives and like last Januarys unexplained crash of a Viscount over Virginia with a loss of 50 lives emphasize the CLEAR LAKE Frank M Hanson 87 retired deputy state auditor and pioneer North Iowa banker was found dead in bed early Tuesday Acting Cerro Gordo County coroner Frederick B Shaffer PARIS Nikita Khrush chevs performance at the sum mit meeting that failed to get off the ground indicates he is engaged in a struggle to main tain his claim to lead world communism Because of that a new cold war freeze may be in prospect comparable even to the danger ous 1948 Stalin days of the Ber lin blockade Unless he got an apology from the President of the Unit ed States Khrushchev insisted he could not negotiate with the US President This he added in an aside was a matter in volving the internal politics of the Soviet Union THE IMPLICATION is that I Khrushchev is engaged in a threesided struggle with 1 the Stalinists 2 the military and 3 the Chinese Commu nists who have been nagging said death was due to a heart attack Mr Hanson held the position deputy auditor for 20 years Since his retirement in 1955 he lived in his home at Oakwood Park Clear Lake FUNERAL arrangements are incomplete at the Ward Funeral Home Surviving are his wife Ada Adel a son Norris Des Moines one daughter Mrs Frank Genevieve Flynn La fayette Ind one sister Mrs L Larson San Francisco Calif five grandchildren and Invite to Nikita spurned PARIS Premier Ni kita Khrushchev insisted Tues jday there can be no summit con ference unless the United States him for what appear to them to be reckless adventures in peace making Khrushchev destroyer of the image of Stalin as a demigod seems tc have bowed to the Stalinists The Soviet chieftain has been required to kick overboard all he has built with great care over the past three years Ap parently in the Stalinist and Red Chinese view his peace gestures went much too far and threatened communism as a A CITIZENS RETURN President Eisenhowet greets an old friend Mayor Jean Minot during a surprise visit to the Paris suburb of Marnes Lo Co quette The village in which the President in 1951 More pressure on the West preparing Berlin moves PARIS Niki point that no one can rest on I two great grandchildren statistical laurels FEDERAL AVIATION author ity has said that nearly onehalf of all air carrier accidents last year resulted from error or fail ure on the part of t h e flight crew New regulations designed to reduce this human factor in cluded a requirement of FAA approval of air carrier flight crew training programs stiffer qualification requirements for copilots higher medical stand ards for all pilots and compul sory retirement of pilots reach ing age 60 FAA attributed onefourth of last years accidents to faulty m a i ntenance of planes by ground crews 18 per cent of the Frank Marion Hanson was born March 18 1873 in Grundy County near Dike the son of Jens and Marie Peterson Han son He attended the county schools and a Waterloo business school He operated banks m G o 1 d f i e I d Belmond and Klemme In 1898 he erected a building and started a bank at Kanawha which he operated un til 1905 HE THEN MOVED to Garner where he became president of the First National Bank re maining with it until it merged with the Farmers Bank in 1929 He was state representative from Hancock County in 1925 and later served as a deputy constantly moving dynamic ta Khrushchev boycotted an accidents to structural failures I state comptroller in flight and 7 or 8 per cent t severe air turbulence T h f agency accordingly has been putting more stress on qualifica tions of airline mechanics and on maintenance practices Suspicion that the Electra ac cident over Indiana resultec from an encounter with air tur bulence of a severity the plane was not built to withstand gave impetus to plans to require in stallation of automatic flight re corders on all airliners The re corders designed to survive fire and the impact of a crash would be expected to provide clues to structural failures en gine malfunctions or other causes of accidents that left no survivors to tell what went wrong TWO BAD airline crashes of the past six months bore strong signs of sabotage Both involved National Airlines planes one of which plunged into the Gulf of Mexico with 42 persons aboard last November and the other of whfch fell near Bolivia N C last January with a loss of 34 lives Growth of both commercial and private flying and expan sion of high speed jet flights make attainment of greater air safety a constantly more diffi cult problem Lack of control His wife is the former Ad Huyck to whom he was marrie in September 1906 He is a member of the Congre gational Church Verity Lodg No 250 Royal Arch Masons am the Shrine FRANK M HANSON towers at many small airports inadequate lighting facilities at even most large airports short comings of badweather landing aids and limitations of present traffic control on the airways all offer opportunities for im proving safety records and low ering accident rates to the ir reducible minimum Engineers union head will retire CLEVELAND Ohio L Brown grand chief of the 70 000mcmber Brotherhood of Lo comotive Engineers since 19J3 will retire July 31 the unions headquarters announced Tues day Brown who will be 67 in August will he succeeded by Roy E Davidson 58 assistant gnmd chiof Brown is a native of Boorie Iowa j force Khrushchev for years has been fascinated by the idea of a Soviet Union so powerful and so economically prosperous that it could turn the world toward Communism without exporting revolution or supporting it by overt forms THIS HAS BEEN costly to Communists in various areas In the Arab nation of Iraq for example Communists felt strong enough months ago to make a grab for the whole country They lacked only the assurance of Moscows support Khrushchev not only withheld it he advised them against moving In other backward formerly colonial countries where Com munism places its best hopes for expansion what looked Jike fairly cheap victories were sac rificed to Khrushchevs long range peace offensive He did not disavow the world revolu tion but he did not want it to be either expensive or dangerous to the Soviet Union In quest of his sort of peace in which the Soviet Un ion after bringing about a de gree of nuclear and other dis armament would still be in a position to dictate terms to the rest of the also pared the strength of the Soviet army and ran into oppo sition there Oskaioosa to go on daylight time OSKALOOSA w Oskaioosa vill go on daylight savings time lunday The City Council Monday light adopted an ordinance to iut the city on daylight time rom 2 am May 22 until Oct 0 Oskaloona thus joins a num er of other eastern and south entral Iowa cities in the swing fasttime emergency session of the collap sing summit conference Tues day and Communist sources made it known he is preparing drastic new moves against West Berlin The Eastern sources revealed Khrushchev is ready to carry out this week his threat to sign a separate peace treaty with East Germany ending four pow er rights in the approaches to West Berlin Khrushchev told a sidewalk news conference he would fly to East Berlin Wednesday unless President Eisenhower made a public apology for U2 spy plane aggression against the Soviet Union Eisenhower refused and Khrushchev prepared an even bigger Berlin crisis even as the summit talks were dying It was clear the United States the flights To go further wouk be public humiliation before the eyes of the world and an admis sion that the Russians were the peace leaders and the West the aggressors Khrushchev has made it clear that such a treaty would end all Western rights in West Berlin and he warned in a series of vi olent antiAmerican speeches last week any attempt to save North of Manly 1 rail cars derai MANLY Seven cars in a routed by Oelwein or Clarion freight train of 70 cars were McWaters said the track was derailed Monday night on the Chicago Great Western tracks a mile north of here According to J H McWat to be cleared by late Tuesday and traffic resumed over the regular route The cause of the derailment has not been determined The ers Mason City division agent fjrst car to go off the track of the six of the north was a COVered hopper of ce bound cars contained cement ment The remainder of the and the seventh lumber The cars remained upright and train was the regularly sched were hauled into Hayfield or uled night train from Clarion to Hayfield The jackknifed cars tore up about 300 feet of track Other night trains were re back to Manly None of the crew was in jured by the derailment They were in the front and the back ends of the train Soviet satellite seen over Iowa DES MOINES ffi The new Russian satellite was clearly visible over Iowa Tuesday morn ing It looked like a steady red light as it moved across the sky from southwest to northeast The passage lasted about minutes and was first visible at am The satellite was followed by the carrier rocket tumbling end over end They appeared about as bright as a Big Dipper star Moonwatchers will continue to observe the satellite the next few mornings The time of pas sage Wednesday will be the same as Tuesday apologizes and punishes those re sponsible for the U2 flight We wont attend a conference as long as the Americans will not give us satisfaction he said He made his stand three times in two informal interviews and in a statement issued through the Soviet Embassy THE UNITED States mean time showed no sign of meeting the Soviet leaders demands by going beyond President Eisen howers disclosure Monday that U S spy flights over the Soviet Union are discontinued Khrushchevs formal state ment said I am ready to participate in a meeting with President de Gaulle of France Prime Minis ter Macmillan of Great Britain and U S President Eisenhower to exchange views on whether conditions have materialized to start the summit conference If the United States have really come to the decision to condemn the treacherous incur sion of American military air craft into the air space of the Soviet Union publicly express regrets ovet these incursions punish those who are guilty and ive assurance that such incur sions will not be repeated in the future we would be ready on the receipt of such assurance to par icipate in the summit confer ence THIS STATEMENT seemed to mean that the Soviet premier vas willing to get together with he Western Big Three but that any such session could deal only ith his preliminary demands His maneuver appeared to be primarily an attempt to shift to lisenhower the blame for break ng up the summit conference Eisenhower met with De sign it They said KhrushchevGaulle and Macmillan and De AP Photofax 52 when he was supreme commander of NATO forces made him an honorary citizen a few years ago Britains Prime Minister Macmillan served as interpreter for the reunion could go no further than to endlBerlin with force would be met by force Communist diplomats said Khrushchev considered the pe riod of negotiations with the al lies on Germany terminated for the time being and that Russia would proceed unilaterally on Berlin The Communists said a draft peace treaty already had been worked out by Communist ex perts and that Khrushchev brought it to Paris ready to now felt himself freed from last years Berlin truce accord with Eisenhower and other Western headers Khrushchev Monday conferred with the ambassadors of Com munist Poland Czechoslovakia and Hungary in a secret meet ng at his headquarters Tues Gaulle invited Khrushchev to sit with them He scorned the in vitation but 45 minutes later is sued his statement putting the issue up to Eisenhower De Gaulle issued his invitation to Tuesdays session at the sug gestion of Macmillan Motor cycle messengers vainly sped decision day the word went round of his the invitation to Sezanne about i75 miles from Paris where Khrushchev had gone on a mo tor tour On the inside GEN de GAULLE knows my position Khrushchev said Editorials Page 4 then very well we wont attend a conference as long as the Americans will not give us satisfaction A bit earlier in a sidewalk in North Iowa News Clear Lake News Society News Sports 5 7 789 1314 Latest Markets 16 Mason City 1617 Comics 19 Farm News SAME DATE19S9243 TRACK TORN UP of the seven freight cars which left the tracks north of Manly await ar rival of a wrecker from Oelwein Railroad officials are continuing an investigation and cause of the ac cident still is not known terview Khrushchev said he was ready to leave if his demands were not accepted 21 Macmillan arrived first at De Gaulles Elysee Palace for the Big Three meeting He was six minutes early Then Eisenhow jer drove into the palace court iyard Khruschev back from his trip stayed at the Soviet Em bassy The Big Three waited a while then went on without him Roof collapses at Otrumwa icehouse OTTUMWA roof of a large ice storage building col lapsed Tuesday No one was in ijured in the collapse of the roof of the threestory frame build ing owned by the Schafer Ice and Cold Storage Co Firemen called to assist in locating jail ammonia valves in order to shut off the flow of gas ESCAPEES NABBED FULTON Mo UPI Au thoritics using a team of blood hounds Tuesday tracked down Uhc last of seven inmates who escaped Monday from the ward for the criminally insane at the Missouri State Hospital hert   

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