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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 24, 1959, Mason City, Iowa                                Daily Newspaper AM HOME EDITION The ThatY MVkes All NoVtk Ijowaiis v r Two n r l in Sons of II Doukhobors to Obey Lays Send Kids to School WASHINGTON Cana das rebellious Doukhobors one doorv to i the future is opening as another1 slams shut The closed door if Russias reported refusal to accept the r i g i o us sects extremists These members asked to return to the homeland aban doned by their fathers and grandfathers 60 years ago The new avenue of hope is seen in the fact Sons of Freedom as the Doukhobqrs dissident minority calls itsilf have at last agreed to obey Canadian laws and send their children to school THE DOUKHOBOR move ment originated in Czarist Rus sia during the 17th century says the National Geographic Society Its founders rallied a serfs and peasants who dared challenge the arbitrary tenets and ritual of theOrtho dox Church As the sects influence grew the name which means spirit wrestler or fighter was first used by official priesthood as a term of deri sion for the rebels The Douk hobors however cannily adopt ed the designation as signifying those who fight in behalf of the Divine Though DEATH FLEW LOW The station wagon ofAir Force Lt William Scholvin 25 and his wife Sacra mento Califr lies crushed beneath a tractortrailer Scholvins were killed the trucker cab oh the Lehigh Valley Thruway at Allentown Pa i George Brown Detroit AP Pbotofax The freak accident blockedtrafficfor some time The Mrt eventually called themselves Christians of the Universal Brotherhood the more pictur esque name stuck belief that God MOSCOW Russians speaks directly to the heart of every man without need of church or government made conflict inevitable From the time of iron willed Catherine the Great the groups commu nal way of life its doctrines of equality and universal brother hood and above all its resist ance to military service re sulted in often brutally repres sive measures including arrest torture and death BETWEEN WAVES of cution and struggles for leader ship within the sect the Douk hobors flourished Their farm ing ability frugality and single ness of purpose brought peri odic wealth Though they used primitive methods their fields yielded well whether they tilled the fertile soil around the Black Sea as in the early days or Saturday reported plans for a huge dam in Bering Strait be tween Alaska and Siberia a dam which they said couk transform Arctic wastes into worked the barren uplands of theCaucasus to which they were exiled by Czar Nicholas I in 1840 The great exodus to Canada followed of troubles in 1 which revived religious fervor factional disputes and defiance to authority all played a part The issue that touched off the explosion was the old military conscription Some Doukhobors found refuge in Canada in 1898 and 1899 after an unsuccessful at tempt to colonize in Cyprus Their chief Peter Verigin came over later on his release from Siberia The immigrants worked first as laborers then gradually moved westward to take up homesteads in Sas katchewan and finally in British Columbia THOUGH DISAGREEMENTS with authorities usually over taxes and school of the Douk hobors in time adapted to Ca nadian life and and be came responsible citizens The Sons of Freedom however re mained a splinter group that long discredited all They not only refused to conform but met government pressures by staging nudist parades and burning houses usually their own The recent change in attitude hinted at by the agreement to allow Freedomite children to attend public schools followed drastic provincial action Un der stringent truancy lawsj a number of youngsters were taken from their parents quar tered in the dormitories ofa welfare institution and sent to school fertile C 1 o s e Soviet American cooperation would be needed for the project Tass the Soviet news agency said the idea is for a 46mile barrier of reinforced concrete pontoons between the western tip of Alaska and the Chukchi Peninsula Designs for the dam have been completed by a So viet engineer and details have been published in Literary Ga zette E X AC T L Y HOW thi darn positioned was not dis closed Fortysix miles would not be enough to bridge the 55 mile gap between Chukchi Pen insula and Alaska Engineer Bdrisov said it would work this way The dam across the Bering Strait should neutralize the ef feet of the Greenland and other cold cur rents on the powerful and warm Gulf Waterpumped from the Arc tic to the Pacific Ocean woulc neutralize cold currents whic would be unable to meet anc mix with the Gulf Stream Borisov said SIMULTANEOUSLY t he pumps would step up the influx of the Gulf Stream wa The Gulf Stream would pass unhampered through the Arctic Ocean giving off its As a result Borisov said direct flow of warm Atlantic RAINING EVERY DAY Ikes Luck Runs AUGUSTA Ga OR President Eisenhower usually has extraordinary luck with the weather But his luck appears to have pretty well runout Official forecasts indicate Eisenhower hadnt seen any in the way of rain It be that when he towri the ram stopped But visit to Augusta the 73rdjjinct jt was he arrived from Washington Wednes day So no golf which was why he Thursday the President said he thought he had chrpriic bronchitis and that it all started three years ago But later he played 18 holes of golf in chilly The skies were leaden Friday as Eisenhower teed off it the championship Augusta National course A if started to drizzle but he kept on playing He was reported to have an ticipated the rain anddressed for it More Americans Due to Get Nobel Prizes STOCKHOLM Sweden W Stockholm newspapers Satur daynamed two American atomic scientists as probable winners of the 1959 prize The Americans mentioned are Dr Emilio Segre 54 and Dr Owens Chamberlain 49 both of the University of California in Berkeley ProfV Jaroslav Heyrovsky 69 head of the Polargraphic In titute in Prague was listed as a chemistry prize candidate Winners of both the chemistry and physics prizes will be nnounced Monday by the Swed shxAcademy of Science Heyrovsky is the father bi method of an lyzing complicated chemical olutions with the aid of elec pi a nes slipped 1 JCtibatf v air fore e pi tr ols rfd ed Ha vana with mipr e anUgdVernm eb i leaflets The Jitest in a series fa day that No Comment by Van Doren NEW Two big money winners Charles Van Doren and Hank Bloomgarderi Friday changed their origina stories about their television quiz show activities The dis crapancies they admitted were hotrevealed Both men at 6ne time claimed they not involved in any rigging ofN NBCs now defunc TwentyOne quiz Van Doren won ohthe show and Bloomgarden They voluntarily returned Fri day to the district attorneys of fice where they first made statements a year ago Dist Atty Frank S Hogan said thej made fsubstaritial changes in their original statements HOGAN WAS ASKED if the amended statements indicated they had lied to his office a yea ago wouldnt want to answer that he replied s Asked if the two had come in to purge Hogan said Idont want to adopl that Hogan said Bloomgarden a public relations con sultarit signed cor reciting answers he gave to the district attprneys office some months ago prior his appear ance beforea Manhattan gram jury violent rto waters through the Arctic into the Pacific would be created instead of the present confused cross current of warm and cold waters which maintains and re news the oceans ice cover This straight flow would destroy the Preliminary estimates put the cost of the dam at about 70 bil lion rubles amounting at the official exchange rate to more than billion SAME IOWA 9AFETT DEPARTMENT FIGURES IraffU Segre and are accredited with the discovery of the antiproton a negatively charged proton The newspaper Expressen al so listed American space sci entist JanYfes Van Allenof the State Iowa and the German rocket pioneer Her mann Oberth as qualified Nobel Prize candidates but it devoted practically a full page to the work of the two Berkeley sci entists Assisted by Dr Clyde Wie gand and Dr Thomas Ypsilan tis Segre and Chamberlain made their discovery in Sep tember 1955 with a specially constructed machine known as the bevatron The antiproton was long sought as a means of explain ng some of the mysteries of the universe Although it is a potent annihilator of matter scientists say it poses no threat to the ma erial universe On the Inside 4 Church Mason Crty News 47 Society I Sports Ml Comics 12 Maroon and 13 Clear Lake News M Building 1415 Latest Markets North Iowa News II CHAMBERLAIN Charge Filed in Robert Levar 63 211 S Fed eral Saturday was making ar rangements for posting of a bond for his the county jail He is awaiting grand jury action on a charge of assault with intent to com mit r The charge was filetl against Levar Friday afternoon ind lie waived preliminary hearing be fore Police Judge B R Dunn Helmer R Thbstensen 31 Minneapolis who was shot by Levar Thursday night accord ing to the charge remains in good condition at Mercy Hos pital and is improving Thosten son was shot with a revolver in Levars tavern Accident Fatal to Davenport Youth DAVENPORT Ufi J a m e s Kcrr 20 Davenport died in a hospital Saturday of irijurics ceived inan late Friday Police said three cars were involved in the accident at an intersection here Fidel took over gpverninaient New Years Dayl Castro charged that counter revolutionary planesbased in the United States carried out raids He denounced U S authorities for failing to halt them He to take quick advantage of a U Bureau of Investigation report former Cuban rev olutionary air force chief Pedrp Diaz Lanz admitted flying a leailet plane overHavana Wed THE DISCLOSURE is expect ed to bring new and stronger demands from Castro thai Washington take action againsl Cuban refugees in the United States wanted by his govern ment for trial as war criminals Diaz Lanz now living Miami Fla fled Cuba last July He charged that Castro is a Communist and his regime is riddled with Reds Diaz Lanz laughed at Castros claim that the leaflet planes had dropped bombs on Havana who were killed and wounded were hit by wild fire from irresponsible soldiers at the antiaircraft guns and by an tiCastro people driving through the he said MAJ HUBERT MATOS the militarycommander in Cama guey province again raised the issue of Communist infiltration in resigning this week The scholarly 40 year old Matos who fought with Castro was arrested and denounced as a traitor by his old triend Matos and 30 junior officers who resigned with him report edlyjre being held at an here There was no reporton whether he had been formally arraigned on the trea son charge maintained that Matoflife is in danger Kave from Cuba that they want to kill he told reporters in Miami No Hie has been able to hear what Ma tos has to Van ad mitted also that origina statement was hot correct As for Fridays conference ar rangedby Van Dorenpresum ablyupon advice of hislawyer Ithink he gave truthful IT WAS AFTER his 1958 con ference in Hogahs office that Van Doren complained Its silly and distressing to think that people dont have more faith in quiz Hogan would not say whether he intended to bring Van Doren and Bloomgarden back before a grand jury for a review of their original testimony in the light of their amended statements On Hogan con tinued this is a search for the truth You remember the grand jury could not find any viola tion of law There was nothing in tffeir contracts repre sented them the TV shows to be bona fide contests It was in terms of Van Doren had no comment for newsmen after his talk with Hogan but he did register sur prise when told of reports that he had made false state ments in his grand jury ap pearances Mason City Mostly fair Satur day night and Sunday Winds diminishing Saturday night colder lows 30 to 35 A little warmer Sunday highs 50 to 55 Iowa Diminshing winds clear arid colder Saturday night lows 30 northeast to 38 south west Generally fair anda lit tle warmer Sunday highs low 50s east lower 60s west Outlook forMonday Paitlj cloudy a little warmer east Minnesota Fair and warmer Highs Sunday 5060 GlobeGazette weather data up to 8 Saturday Maximum 53 Minimum 38 At Precipitation 45 Mrs Deyos Extradition Authorized Gov Herschel Loveless Fri day signed extradition papers or the return of Grace Deyo 43 rural Clear Lake to souri to face a charge of mur dering her husband Deyo is held in the Cer roGordp County jail as a fugi tive from justice A WARRANT of arrest issued in the Court of Ozark County she conspired with BUT Shirid ler 40 Almartha topoi son her Kenneth Deyo 42 Shindler earlier this week was apprehended by authorities and later released on The governors office issued a saying that Missouri authorities are to come to Iowa VIonday to get Mrs Deyo IOWA LAW permits Mrs eyo to ask for a habeas cor pus hearing in District Court ontestirig the legality of jeing returned to Missouri Mrs Deyos attorney E R ioyle Saturday had not de ided whether to ask the Court or a habeas corpus hearing Mrs Deyo was arrested in jarly October and was released n a bond Later she was gain taken into custody after uthorilies here contended owas extradition law made no revisions for letting her free n bond District Judge T A 3eardmore agreed that she was ot entitled to bond MISS ISU AMES UPI Marjorie Vaage Davenport was crowned his years Iowa State Univer ity Homecoming Queen Friday ight MINE ESCAPE ALEXANDRIA W All nine men aboard a crippled KB5r tanker parachuted to safe ty before the big plane crashed and exploded 12 miles northwest of Friday night AP Photofax FINISHES PROJECT HE CANT SEE Piano tun er John Giffbrd 68 Spencer puts the finishing touches on a sun porch hebuilt onto his home Noth ing unusual about that except for the fact that Gif ford is blind A cabinet maker by hobby he cut every board and pounded every nail that went into the project relying on his sense of feel Hes been blind since he was 7 by Ike Union May Make Offer i By JOHN MOODY PITTSBURGH nego tiators resumed bargaining Sat urdijy and President Eisen hower strongly urged themto keep at it until the 102day steel strike is settled The President made his new plea through an aide at his va in Augusta James C Hagerty White House press secretary said of the President He sincerely hopes that when both sides re new theirrnegotiations this aft ernoon in Pittsburgh they real ize fully the obligation they owe to the United States and that they remain in consultation and negotiation until they settle The head of the Presidents threeman factfindingboard in the dispute said in Philadelphia that he has been in touch with Joseph chief of the Federal DR GEORGE TAYLOR be and Finnegan talked over the matter of how they could best cooperate in the event the fartfinding board is recon vened r Taylor and Hagerty both de nied a published report that Taylorhad bower1 srperTnission to resume mediation efforts The hew negotiations wers arranged under a directive Neither the United Steelwork ers Union nor the industry vould comment on the possibili ty of new proposals being made The government already has obtained a TaftHartley injunc tion to send the strikers back to the mills for 80 days But the Third Circuit Court of Appealsblocked of the pending out come appeal But the court directed both sides to make every effort to settle the strike by collective bargaining while the appeal was being studied A court ruling on the appeal is expected early next THE MEETING IS first since negotiations col lapsed in Washington In Washington Secretary ot Labor James P Mitchell said he was gratified to see the two parlies peace talks He urged around the clock nego tiations until the dispute is set tled The union was first to suggest reopening of negotiations USW President David J McDonald sent telegrams to96 steel com panies inviting them to meet with union committees in Pitts burgh Monday A short time later the 12 big companies of the steel industry proposed that the union meet Saturday with the industrys fourman team that has been doing most of the negotiating for the industry since contract talks started last May The walkout has halted near ly 90 per cent of the nations steelmaking facilities Strike Forces Production Cut at Oliver Corp CHARLES nation al steel strike has forced the Oliver Corp farm machinery plant to cut production to three days a week in most depart ments George Bird plant man ager said the slowdown was being made to stretch the avail able material So we will be able to show our dealers the plant in The plants dealers usually visit the plant in the fall to see the manufacturing operations Bird also said it would necessary to lay off some em ployes   

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