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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: October 22, 1959 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 22, 1959, Mason City, Iowa                                v NorMij Iowas Daily Newspaper tfrSl Edited fee nW Be VOLi The Kewsoaper That Makes North I o wa is Neig hbors M MASON CITY IOWA THURSDAY OCTOBER B VfSf HOME EDITION MASON CITY DAYS f Tfcwrtdoy Frfcfay Million Iowa Program Looks to Mine Is Closed but Industries Will Moye In EDITORS NOTE On Oct 23 a year ago the shook in Springhill bringing disaster to men working in the deepest in North America W ha t has hap pened to the mining town since And are of tragedy heroism and mirac ulous survival still alive in Springhill SPRINGHILL coal mine is dead And Friday the homes and streets of Spring hill will be brimming with memories of the 75 men who died with it one year ago The 99 men who lived throug the caprice of nature which wrecked the mine will the terror the agony the grief and more than miracles that occurred here The mine is dead But it wai a busy efficient place last Oct 23 as the 174 men of the eve ning shift reported for work We JUMPED ON the trol leys and went down the slope the same as recalls Maurice Ruddick At 5 minutes after 8 the town shook It felt like an earthquake but the coal wise people of Springhill knew better They ran to the mine Calder manager Noi 2 Colijeryi Men there told him there had been a terrific bump farther down in the slop ing depths of the mine the deepest in North America Phones below were dead There was nothing unusua about a bump a sudden shift ing of the rockabove or below the coal seam But usually they were confined to a small area This one was big The floor came up and the ceiling came says Wil fored Hunter I hurled about 15 feet along with more falling coal and rock and tim ber and iron than I ever saw RESCUE WORK began at 5 oclock next morn ing 81 men had been brought out one of them died were missing Then they be gan finding the dead It seemed doubtful anyone still lived But in a pocket 100 feet long and three feet high Hunter and 11 other miners were going through the torture of waiting And 350 feet away behind a wall of coal and rock Ruddick and seven other men also lived The men found some sand wiches and a twoquart can of water in a couple of lunch pails The water rationed out in a tiny aspirin bottle lasted three Shortly before noon on Wed nesday Oct 29 Gorley who was with the group of noise I wouldnt let myself be lieve he says I just lay there listening for nearly an hour I guess Then I heard a pick or somethingclick on the pipe a broken air pipe and I hollered God how I anesthetized by grief awoke with joy Horns honked church bells pealed People laughing and crying surged to the pit mouth The second miracle followed three days later Give me a drink of the indomit able Ruddick told his rescuers and Ill sing you a There were no more surviv ors The last body was recov ered Nov 6 Since disaster Mayor Ralph Gilroy says about 125 families have left Springhill to find work elsewhere Many miners who stayed are still on the disaster relief fund Some receive up to a Week if they have large families But Gilroy says three small industries will soon open And by next spring we should have a fairsized federal penitentiary farm in operation on the site of years he says RIDING HIGH Jim Will more a college sophomore at WaJla Walla Wash wasnt bothered by the steel short age when he decided to build a bicycle He startled resi dents with excursions about town on this heconjured up from an old bedstead He has to climb a tree to mount it Nobel Prize Awarded to Italian Poet STOCKHOLM Sweden W1 Italian poet Salvatore Quasi 58 Thursday w a awarded the 1959 NobelPrize in He te of he has always fought tor world peace and friendship The Swedish Academy cited Quasimodo for lyrical work which it said tire expresses the tragic exper ience of life in our The poet a onetime jackofall trades now leaches history of literature at Giuseppe Verdi Mu sical Conservatory in Milan As in the four other Nobel categories this the mon lary prize is These prizes are argest since the awardsl were begun in 1901 The mon jy comes fromji ncome of a rust fund es tablished Alfred Nobel the Swedish nventor of dy namite Quas modps own QUASIMODQ works are rooted in classic Greek and Italian culture but he deals with contemporary events He has written poems on the Auschwitz concentration camp the execution of Italian partisans by Fascists the bod es of Benito Mussolini and Clar etta Petacci the duces mis tress Set for Mason City Partly cloudy through Friday Lows Thurs day night 4246 Highs Friday 6266 Partly cloudy through Friday Locally cooler central Thursday night lows in the 40s Highs Friday in the 60s Showers west Friday night Further outlook cloudy with occasional light rain Saturday Minnesota Mostly fair warmer Highs in 60s GlobeGazette weather data up o 8 Thursday Maximum 61 Minimum 39 At 8 43 Precipitation 25 On the Inside Editorials 4 Society News Comics t CUar 12 Mason City News U17 North Iowa News II 1920 Latest Markets 32 But Time Not Important Ike AUGUSTA Ga Eisenhower said Thursday willing to go to anEastWest summit conference whenever the Western Allies have coordi nated their positions rThe President told a news conference that without such prior coordination at a pre summit the situation could be just a confusion Eisenhower confirmed thai he has been pri vnte correspondence with the Western an East West summit meeting with So viet Premier Nikita S Khrush chev as early as December BUT THE PRESIDENT said he has no strong feelings re garding the time of any such session The important thing he em phasized is that the West get together and present a united front at any summit session Eisenhower stressed that he is ready and willing to meet at any time with French President Charles de Gaulle British Prime Minister Harold Macmil lan German Chancel lor Konrad Adenauer Eisenhowers news conference by about 50 report heldjiftithe Georgian Hote here a few milesfrom his va cation headquarters at the Au gusta National Golf Club Eisenhower dealt with these the time he went to Palm Springs Sept 30 for a nineday rest in his laymans opinion he was suffering from an acute cold and Eisenhower added that he developed bron chitis about three years ago and the condition he believes since has become chronic LABOR LEGISLATION Speaking against the back ground of the marathon steel strike Eisenhower said he feels the TaftHartley law does not have a very brilliant history He added that he does not it as verly good or adequate legislation But the President said further in response to a question that he has no intention at this time of asking Congress for new labor legislation when the lawmakers reconvene in January Eisenhower went on to say that the whole matter must be kept under careful study He said that if both sides in the steel dispute dont cooperate then it may become necessary to do something to make sure the country is not damaged SPACE of this countrys program to de relop huge superthrust rockets Eisenhower said he sees no reason why it should be put on a basis of competition with the Russians That was his comment when asked for his views regarding criticism in some quarters that the space and missile programs lagging behind the Soviet Union Eisenhower discussed the mat ter in the light of his decision Wednesday to transfer the Armys ballistic missile agency to the civilian National Aeronau tics and Space Administration The President had high praise for the Army team of scientists headed by Dr Wernher von Braun He called the Army team a brilliant group He said he decided to shift the Army team to the civilian space agency because the big booster rockets which the Army is work ing on are as he put it of no interest to the Defense Depart ment THOR FIRED VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE Calif British Royal Air success fully fired a Thor intermediate range ballistic missile Wednes day from this central California coastal base It was the seventh Thor fired here by RAF crews AP Photofax HARD DAY AT THE OFFICE Disinterested dele gates Rishikesh Shaha left of Nepal and Omar the United Arab Republic show lack of enthusiasm as the U N votes on a resolution condemning Red Chinese for its tactics m Tibet The bill was 26 nations ab stained voting and their delegates took time out for cat naps 8084 PER CENT EFFECTIVE Treated Milk Remedy for and Rheumatoid Arthritis es Deve ST PAUL of Minnesota pro fessor said Thursday he has developed a treated milk rem edy for allergies and atoid Millions ofsufferers hiaybel helped by taking one bottle1 a day of treated milk according to William Peterson said the system has per cent effec tive in relieving the pain of sufferers and 84 per cent effective in combating allergies Minnesota scientist said more than 1000 persons took part in a test designed to show the effect im mune milk on rheumytold to milk three the arthritic pain disappeared showed no recurrence of symptoms Similar tests on hay if ever and allergy conducted Pelersen Ya j d Morethan 250 tbpk the milk while group acted as a g receiving standard remedies The is very simple said In the case of hay fevercombating milk introduced into the cows udder Within the cow pro duces eiiough diseasekilling makethe milk effective against the disease milk is ready togo into commercial produc tion The a quart price for the test milk may drop runder heavier said More Children Hope Theyre Mother pf Quintuplets Says SAN ANTONIO Tex Pretty Mrs Charles G Hannan said Thursday in her first inter view since she gave birth to quintuplets that she wants more children and hopes they are girls She gave birth Tuesday in Lackland Air ForceBase Hospi talto five girls all of whom died because they were three months premature Her 29yearold husband an Air Force first lieutenant and aerial Janker navigator sat on her bed while she talked to two reporters I cant believe it all hap pened to she said I am happy to have brought five daughters into the world I un derstand Gods will not His She wore a flowered bed jacket and lipstick and seemed in good spirits Her spirit actually seemed better than those of her husband Mrs Hannan a blonde is 27 Her husband met reporters be fore they went into her room His voice cracked and tears came to his eyes when he men tioned the quintuplets Lackland hospital physicians safil there is no reason she cant AP Pholofax QUINTS PARENTS MEET PRESS Lt and Mrs Charles Hannan meet the press for the first time after the deaths of their quintuplet daughters Han nan holds his wifes hand as she smiles in a valiant attempt to keep from breaking down have more children She and her husband have two sons Robert 5and Pat 4 Hannan said he had told his sons about what happened The older boy understood but I dont think the smaller boy he said Robert seemed quiet and sort of with drawn because he had been anxious to have a Hannan has asked for 30i days leave I am going to lake 30 days off and we are going to try to collect everything together he said The five babies be buried Friday in separate coffins in Taylor the hometown of the Hannans Their funeral will be held in St Marys Catholic Church 3 Killed in Bluffs Crash TREYN6R elderly killed late Wed nesday bight in a cartruck col lision on Highway 92 near Trey nor about 11 miles east of Coun cil Bluffs Killed were Fred W Kctllcr 71 and his wife Manville and Harry Horn 70 of near Council Bluffs Ray Cameron 23 Winterset driver of the truck was not be lieved seriously injured Officers said an oil transport plowed into the wreckage a few minutes after the accident but the driver of the transport Richard Forte of West Liberty was not injured INJURIES FATAL CEDAR RAPIDS UPDPam ela Merrick 7 Cedar Rapids died Wednesday of injuries suf fered when struck by a car here Tuesday Walkout Remains 5Year Policy Outlined Vast Step Forward in PHILADELPHIA Three f ed e Thursday granted an indefinite stay of a TaftHartley injunction against the striking steel workers This means a continuation of he nationwide walkout now 100daysold pending a Circuit Court of Appeals ruling on the constitutionality of the 80day njunction granted Wednesday by a District Court judge n Pittsburgh Union counsel remarshaled ts arguments declaring that he strike has created no na ional emergency that indeed he economy is and hat the injunction violates the basic rights of labor to strike rights that are part of the col ective bargaining code THE GOVERNMENT after a brief interval of uncertainty over the exact legal issue said t was ready to go ahead with he main question of conslitu ionality of the injunction pro vided it could do so on the basis of briefs filed in the Dis rict Court in Pittsburgh Government lawyers said hey desired to proceed promptly because this is a na tional emergency Chief Judge John Biggs Jr said Lets go ARTHUR GOLDBERG chief counsel for the United Steel workers said he wanted the record to show the union has filed for a further stay Circuit Judge Austin Stalcy in granting a temporary stay Wednesday did so on the condition the union file immediately for a further stay It has done this Judge Biggs looked over Sta leys report and indicated he wasnt quite sure of Judge Sta leys intent He said the stay is now continued by the direc tion of this court pending dis position of this Some sources close to the cir cuit court believe the issue will go unresolved until the first of next week Spokesmen for both union and management have indicated a determination to take the case all the way to the Supreme Court FROM OUR WIRE SERVICES AMES The Iowa Highway Commission Thursday an nounced plans for an ambitious fiveyear road building pro gramwhich called for 650 in actual highway construc tion One of the major points in the elaborate plan was the adoption of the principle of building roads where they are needed rather than where the most political pressure is brought to bear However the road building program for both primary and interstate work was not based exclusively on the sufficiency rating basis Commission Chairman Robert Brice Waterloo said that the commission in formulating the program also had to take note of committments made by pre vious commissions i R M TUTTON assistant chief engineer told United Press International that the sufficiency rating will become the dominant factor in road building in about The sufficiency rating is a complicated computation which determines what roads are most in need of development in view of the traffic weather conditions and importance to the surround ing area Before the commission could iise the sufficiency rating as the principal factor in determin ing the order in which roads will be built Brice said the commis sionmust recognize Its 1959 published Jetting pro gram which was delayed for up 0 two years because of lack of unds and poor construction weather RESURFACE previously wid ened highways Widen the shoulderson many lighways Brice said it would take 1960 and part of 1961 to complete he road building which had been scheduled for this year The program of widening Iowas 18foot highways was started under former Gpv Leo and the commission is committed to spend one cent of the state gasoline tax exclusive y for that purpose The commission has also com mitted itself to widen the shoul ders on many highways This ommitment was made to the Bureau of Roads SAME IOWA SAFETY DEPARTMENT FIGURES BRICE SAID all mitmcnts must be taken care of before Iowa road building can e put on a strictly need jasis Brice said the commission has decided to concentrate its in crstate highway construction in the rural areas of Iowa to com pletion of the Des Moines to davenport segment He pointed out that the decision to finish he eastern section of the east west interstate first will not af ect construction of the Des Moines freeway because under rcderal law the interstate mon ey is divided into rural aid ur ban funds THE LIST OF North Iowa projects all of which have not been made public include Chickasaw Iowa 346 Little Brown Church to Williamstown paving I960 Iowa 150 at Fayette bypass right of way to temporary surfacing 000 1960 from U S 65 to Butler County resurface 1960 S 69 nearly 11 miles of resurfacing 1960 359 Buckeye to U S 20 paving 1960 BRANDO MIFFED SANTA MONICA Calif Marlon Brando sayshis former wife wont let him visit their 17monthold son The actor filed a contempt affidavit Wed nesday in Superior Co u r t against actress Anna who divorced him last April   

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