Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - September 28, 1959, Mason City, Iowa                                North Iowas Daily Newspaper Edited for BEVJAZETTE HOME EDITION Newspaper That Makes AM North lowans VOL 97 AuoclatedPrew tad United Frew tatonattonal FuB LMM Wlrw MASON MONDAY SEPTEMBER M 1959 7e Copy Piper ConsUU of Two Ne Threat to Berlin No Longer Exists One Mans Opinion A Radio Commentary By W EARL HALL GlobeGazette Editor BROADCAST SCHEDULE KGU USOO f WOI WTAD 9M Thus WSUL low City Ia Now We Know Mr Khrushchev NIKITA KHRUSHCHEV in his 12day visit in the United States has undoubtedly learned a lot of things about our coun try At least he has confirmed the reports received from some of his buddies including Anas tas Mikoyan These probably sounded just a mite exaggerated to him until he could see with his owij eyes But anybody who assumes that some magic formula has been arrived at by reason oi his visit here to end the cold war is naive indeed Russias dictator may and I think he must be impressed by the economic might of our country and the devotion to our way of life by our people He might be less inclined to push his bluff That however is as far as it goes THE FACT still remains that Khrushchev IS the government of Russia He is accountable to nobody Hes calling the tunes He rose to the dictatorship by a considerable measure of native shrewdness and cunning com bihed with a savage willingness to do whatever was heeded to get ahead This attribute in his makeup was reflected in that historic behind the scenes speech when he attacked Stalin and all his works post humously When somebody long since routed to Siberia or Outer Mbn Summit Talks Likely Praises Peoples Actions PHOTO FROM SPACE Photo at left Shows the first crude picture of the earths cloud cover taken from the U S paddlewheei satellite miles up The signal pattern was recorded at a Hawaiian AP Pholofax tracking station Aug 14 The photo at right shows interpretation of the signal as superimposed on a globe Colder golia no doubt asked him a very embarrassingquestion Where were you when Stalin was committing all these crimes he is quoted as hav ing said When Stalin said Dance I danced Now Nikita says Dance THE RUSSIAN PREMIER or chairman as he apparently prefers to be called has had his first real brush with de mocracy during his time here Hed be at home in a street fight or in a meeting where all the cards are stacked his way But he has proved himself a stranger in a strange land when confronted with the accepted rules and practices of a free society This began to manifest itself in Washington when he stepped out of his plane all smiles and bouncing with enthusiasm As the parade formed however and the people along the streets Iowas weather will turn cold of our national capital greeted him with a reserved politeness a wonderful example of dis ciplined the visitor from Russia quickly lost his ex cess enthusiasm BY CHANCE I arrived in Washington a short time after the reception for Khrushchev I walked over past the Russian embassy then past the Blair House where the Russian party was preparing for a first visit to the White House I wanted to see what security measures were being taken They were quite ample I assure you From one who had watched the parade first on the street then on TV which he found more I heard it suggested that President Eisen er after a weekend battered bj twisters high winds rain anc hail Sundays highest temperatures were from 80 degrees at Bur lington down to 64 at Waterloo and Mason City The outlook for Monday was for top readings from the high 50s to the low 60s and colder weather through the week RAIN AND HAIL pounded eastern Iowa Sunday night with Clinton taking the brunt of the storm Clinton got more than an inch and a half of rain in less than half an hour accompanied by strong winds on top of inches in a short time Saturday Hail stones about the size of ice cubes fell in Davenport Sun day night Traffic on Highway 61 north of Davenport was de layed for a time because of poor visibility and hail The hail storm was brief and moved on into Illinois Damage in Daven port was slight hower received more applause in the one block between Blair House and the House after discharging his passenger than the sum total of cheers and clapping for Khrushchev on the entire line of march In his first formal talk be fore the National Press Club the premier revealed the pat tern of behavior that was to be followed at each subsequent talk until pressure was brought by our state department to head off what could be referred to as embarrassing Bekind to our Ameri cans have been admonished WHEN TALKING in broad generalities about peace and Nikita in his Press Club appearance was smilingly CONTINUED ON PAGE i STORMS SKIPPED around Saturday on winds up to 100 miles an hour Seventeen light planes at th Cedar Rapids airport were d molished Several boats sank i Clintons Mississippi River har bor Winds uprooted trees dam aged homes and tore down pow er lines in Oskaloosa Albia Chelsea Harpers Ferry Ale Gregor Ottumwa Knoxville an Des Moines Ike Will Enter Strike Talks WASHINGTON W Presiden Eisenhower Monday asked lead ers of both sides in the stee strike to meet with him sepa The Weather M a so n C it y Considerable cloudiness with s t te red showers and Monday night low and cold Tuesd Iowa Considerable cloudiness scattered showers and thun derstorms possibly locally heavy southeast Monday night lows 4450 northwest 5056 southeast Mostly cloudy and colder with occasional showers Tuesday highs 56 northwest to lower 60s south east Further outlook Partly cloudy and rather chilly Wed nesday Minnesota Cloudy showers Highs Tuesday 4553 FiveDay Iowa Temperatures for the 5day period Tuesday through Saturday will aver age below normal turning cooler Tuesday and contin uing quite cool thereafter with only minor day to day changes Afternoon high tem peratures will range the lower middle40s Pre cipita will average from 20 to 40 in northwest Iowa 40 to 60 in southeast Iowa occurring as showers mostlyin the first half of the period GlobeGazette weather data up to 8 a m Monday Loss to Typhoon Maximum Minimum At 8 a m YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum 64 46 51 65 31 GlobeGazette weather data up to 8 Sunday Maximum 64 Minimum 48 Precipitation 49 rately on Wednesday in an effor to end the 76dayoId shutdown White House press secretarj James C Hagerty said the President called the meeting to urge both sides to resume free collective bargaining with a view to settlement of the dis pute in the interest of thena On the Inside General News 2 Eat Grow Younger 3 Editorials 4 Clear Lake News t Society 1011 North Iowa News 12 1314 Comics 14 Mason City 1M9 Latest 23 SAME UOWA SAFETY DEPARTMENT FIGURES Two Dead in Crash Near Center Point CENTER POINT tf T w o persons are dead and three others hospitalized with injur ies from an auto accident on Highway 150 on the south edge of Center Point Saturday night Ronald Oliphant 23 of near Marion was killed outright in collision Norman Ash lock 18 Center Point died in an Iowa City hospital Sunday AP Photofax FIVE TIMES TWO Five sets of twins make up a substantial part of 37 pupils in the first grade at FairlawnLincoln School at Lincoln R I The children who have nothingbut love and affection for each other in this photo at least are Darlene and Don ald Hartley Donna and Stephan Achille Jonathan and Susan Reynolds Randall and Robert Rosati and Kathleen and Raymond Gardner TOKYO W Japan staggered Monday under mounting casual ties from the whiplash of a week end typhoon which left at least dead or missing and lomeless Weary officials at national po ke headquarters worked around the clock to keep up with the rising toll as rescuers dug through mud and debris for bodies By noon they listed known dead missing and injured Widespread crop damage sent prices of rice and vegetables skyrocketing heaping more hardship on the grieving popu lace EYEWITNESS accounts of one of the mightiest typhoons ever to hit Japan told a cruel story A Japanese newsman who visited Nagashima a town in central Japan reported I could only guess the location of the main street It was com pletely submerged by floodwa ters So was the railway station and the movie theater Every thing was gone it seemed ex cept for the old man and old woman on whose boat I hitched a A newsman in nearby Hand iold of weeping relatives digging hrough mud and debris by can dlelight for the bodies of 200 Japanese believed buried there At Kuwana city 85 bodies hac been recovered but 685 persons were still missing THE HARBOR of the indus trial city of Nagoya was des cribed as a sea of with seven oceangoing ships ground ed like beached whales and de bris floating everywhere Hun dreds were killed or missing in the city of two million There also was heavy industrial dam age Nagoya Nagashima Handa and Kuwana all border Ise Bay on the Pacific coast of central Japan where Typhoon Vera first struck Saturday with maximum winds over 160 miles an hour The storm swept up the main island of Honshu crossed Hok kaido Island and finally swirled into the Okhotsk Sea and the northern Pacific with diminish ing strength Sunday night NEW BINDERY DES MOINES UPI Iowa prison officials plans to open a binderyto repair schoolbooks from Iowas public schools The officials said the bindery fac tory will open Jan 1 The books now are repaired in Minneapo lis and Chicago Trip by Ike Is Delayed WASHINGTON Eisenhowers proposed visit t Russia will be postponed unti spring both he and Premie Khrushchev agreed Sunday In his news conference before leaving for Moscow followin his 13day tour of this country Khrushchev said the weathe would be better Actually the delay probably means a fullblown crisis ove West Berlin can be deferred a least until after the President visit WHEN ASKED by a reporte why the decision was made Khrushchev replied I wouldlike to reveal a se cret although I have not askec the Presidents permission Hi said he will follow me on tele vision Saturday the President was kind enough to invite me to hi farm where I met his wonder ful grandchildren We had a conference with them as to whether they should accompanj their grandfather to our country and if so Khrushchev continued At that conference they and reached a unanimous deci sion that they should come The question of time arose and took it upon myself to sugges a would be a good time because wil be in bloom everything is warm nothing is frozen Then we discussed it with the Presi dent and he agreed There is no reason for look ing for fleas where fleas do not exist If I have revealed some thing that should have been con cealed I ask the President to excuse me I AM SURE that my grand children would approve of this action of mine and therefore there is agreement on this both between the grandchildren and the The Premiers visit to the farm was made late Saturday He and Eisenhower flew by he licopter to Gettysburg to look over the farm and meet Ikes grandchildren The Pre mier saw a movie of the cruise under the Arctic icecap by the atomic submarine Nautilus and even saw a western movie Khrushchev has more impor tant business immediately ahead He is due in Peiping at midweek for the Oct 1 celebra tion of the Chinese Communists conquest of the China mainland 10 years ago AT A GLANCE What Did Ike Nik Accomplish WASHINGTON did President Eisenhower and Premier Nikita Khrushchev accomplish in their weekend Camp David talks NEGOTIATIONS They agreed problems should be settled by peaceful negotia tions rather than by force DISARMAMENT The two agreed it is the most import ant question facing the world today Khrushchev said he favored appropriate disarma ment inspection and but was not specific The Western powers long have in sisted on foolproof controls COLD WAR Khrushchev said he and Eisenhower found a great deal in common in our understanding of our po sitions and of the need to im prove relations between our two GERMAN REUNIFICATION no progress BERLIN Some progress They agreed to reopen formal negotiations subject to the approval of other countries concerned This could beat a subforeign ministers level at a foreign ministers meeting or a summit conference EXCHANGES progress with re spect to an increase in ex changes of persons and ideas Certain agreements expected soon SOVIET Agreed to reopen negotiations on claim of million against the mostly for endlease aid Stroke Fatal to Steel Boss HYANNIS Mass W Walter Munford a year resident of the strikebound U Steel died Monday at ape Cod Hospital He was 59 Munford suffered a stroke in ic hospital on Thursday the ay after he underwent abdomi al surgery for a knife wound uthorities said he suffered the round accidentally while carry ng kitchen utensils in his sum mer home at Chatham Hospital authorities said there as no connection between the tab wound and the brain roke termed irombosis The hospital said eath was due to complications ollowing the stroke Khrushchev Given Big Reception at Moscow MOSCOWW Nikita At the Sports Palace before Khrushchev returned from or more he assured the his American visit Monday with a declaration that those who are afraid of coexistence are unwitting tools in promot ing the cold Soviet people that progress was made in lowering ten sions He said Eisenhower showed a statesmanlike mind in assessing the situation The Soviet Premier given a Thc premicr could hardly heros welcome told a jam say cnough nice things about packed throng at the Moscow Eisenhower but he reported Sports Palace that the cold dark spots about his visit too war might spark off another gome angry faces were spotted armed conflict Then it on his tour he said Hc callcd vould be loo late to ask ques for cxp0sure and whipping of tions about coexistence forces wnich he declared were when atomb o m bcarrymg working in the United States rockets started he against easing international said Smiling broadly K h r u s h chcv called out okay to wel comers at Moscow Airport on his arrival after a 10hour 28 minute flight from the United States He spoke the word in Eng lish from the top of a ramp leading down from his plane in apparent summary of Ihe results of his tour and talks with President Eisenhower Thousands cheered him and have no doubt that Presi dent Eisenhower would like to make efforts toward universal he said I got the im pression that there are forces which do not work in the same direction as the President I do not know how influential they are for the President is supported by a majority of his At tho end of his speech FROM OUR WIRE SERVICES WASHINGTON President Eisenhower said Monday of his talks with Premier Nikita S Khrushchev threat Berlin no longer exists and his personal conditions for holding a summit conference have been met But Eisenhower declined to say in so many words that tha Soviet leader had given him personal assurances which amounted to lifting the Berlin threat He replied to news conference questions on that point by say inghe did not want to put words in anybodys mouth EISENHOWER SAID he agreed with Khrushchev that the Berlin situation is abnormal of the existence of a group of free people inside Communist territory He said that some system must ba found which would be accepta ble to both sides Officials privately rate a summit conference as a good possibility before Eisenhower makes his spring trip to the So viet Union j Eisenhower disclosedtHat in the courseol had with atCamp David Md from iSidayt night to Sunday afternoon Khrush chev had said that in a friendly way he would take up with Chinese the problem of five Americans still held prisoner in Chinese Coin munist jails He said theyspent very little time talking about Communist 2hina because they immediately found that their views were totally opposed THE PRESIDENT began his unusual Monday morning news conference with glowing praise for the American peoples treat ment of Khrushchev He called them very sophisticated in be ing able to listen to the other fellows arguments and criti cism while remaining strong in their own conviction Eisenhower said that as far as he was concerned no party to the Berlin situation was now under any sort of threat or du ress He said that Khrushchev made an emphatic point that ha had never intended a threat a cerebral against the West German me tropolis Eisenhower said Khrushchev would corroborate the fact that no deadline hangs over Berlin He said that from their Camp David meetings there was defi nite progress because the two big powers were no longer at an impasse on the issue EISENHOWER TOLD report ers he found Khrushchev a dy namic and arresting personal ity a man who resorted to great flights of manner and disposi tion ranging from a negative difficult attitude to easy gen ial discussion He summed up his impres sion of the Soviet premier with two words Extraordinary per sonality As to whether the cold war ice is melting the President said the answer would have to be relative But he thought it was melting if measured by Khrushchevs displeasure that continued heavy military spend ing and the awareness of tha Russian as well as the Ameri can people that EastWest dif ferences must be solved rea sonably and without war Eisenhower said the Camp David meeting in essence should be regarded as a beginning Discoverer V to Burn Up Soon t I1T WASHINGTON tossed flowers into his car on Khrushchev shouted Long v Americas satel his 30mile drive from the AmericanSoviet friendlite is expected to drop into airport to the Sports Palace snip jthe earths atmosphere and burn Beaming and looking welJ That brought his audience to up sometime before Wednesday rested Khrushchev waved its feet cheering and will havo orbited for a month ii back mg and st half 1   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication