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Mason City Globe Gazette: Wednesday, September 23, 1959 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - September 23, 1959, Mason City, Iowa                                North Iowas Daily Newspaper Edited for OM Hi VOL 97 AtMcUted rnm tid UstUd tlit That Makesi Ail North lowans Neighbors Full wtrt MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 23 It5t T Pa HOME EDITION OM ITT Nikita f s Partf Wiri Kids Make Security Difficult Everything That Khrushchev fats Is Inspected FKOM OUK WIRE SERVICES MOINES Four DCS Moines teenage school girls through security officers at Hotel Fort Des Moines Tues day and made their way up 10 flights id the penthousesuite reserved for Ni kita Khrushchev Stunned se curity men whisked the girls back down on an elevator and in the lobby they met Khrush chev who had just arrived at the hotel The Premier greeted each girl with a smile and said he was happy to see them A HOT DOG Nikita Khrush chev ate at a Des Moines pack ing plant here first he ever care fully checked by security men with geiger counters before he Offers to Sell ate it So were the giftpack ages food and even the whisky and ice cubes set out in the presidential suite at the Soviet premiers hotel THE SECURITY as signed to guard Soviet Premier Khrushchev during his Iowa included 150 sheriffs depu ties and policemen from nearly every Iowa county They re sponded Tuesday to a blanket call issued by the Iowa SheriffsAssn SOME PEOPLE mitt a bet When Khrushchev arrived St his hotel here Tuesday attractive girls clad in suits threaded their way the crowd carrying placards that in Russian We are in viting you to attend the South east Drivein KHRUSHCHEV his own ticket for the itinerary of his tour providing he gives security officers suffi cient notice according to a State Department spokesman We would rather be criticized for too much security and gel him home the spokes man added and indicated the size of the security force has not been reduced despite Khrushchevs complaints in San Francisco that his movements were hampered by security forces The State Department spokesman pointed out that the Khrushchev itinerary has been agreed upon by his own secur ity people and that they turned thumbs down on the premiers wish to visit Disneyland AP Pholofax THE PREMIER AND HIS HOST Just before with his host Roswell Garst The Garst ing for Coon Rapids Soviet Premier Khrushchev farms were among the Communist leaders prime stops in his Des for another viewing attractions during his tour of the country caw Mason City Partly cloudy with chance of occasional showers and thunderstorms Wednes r Wednesday fmght 50s 6870 Iowa V cloudy with scat tered showers and thunder storms Wednesday night anc Thursday Cooler east Wed nesday night lows in 50s Little temperature change Thursday highs 6876 Further outlook Friday partly cloudy and a little warmer Fiveday Iowa Temperatures Thursday through next Mon day will average near normal in the west to slightly below normal in the east Afternoon highs will range from the lower to middle 70s Lows will range from the upper 40s to the lower 50s A slight warm ing trend may be expected during the weekend Rainfall will average 10 to 20 of an inch in the extreme southeast occurring as scattered show ers Little if any rain 5s ex pected elsewhere in the state airjilane Tui IowaIangle SECURITY OFFICERS reluctant to allow Premier Khrushchev to leave his car at the Raymond Hoyt farm stop near Bayard Wednesday but be insisted on seeing the growing sorghum Then by the luck of the harvesting operation the sorghum heading machine was going away from the Pre mier as he came to it They are taking it away They dont want us to see the visitor commented But the situation wss soon corrected and the ma chine brought for Khrushchev to examine Soviet Com munist paYty newspaper Pravda told readers that theres an enormous reserve feeling among Americans for the So viet Pravda said the feeling was displayed more clearly than ever in the extra ordinary friendly atmosphere which prevailed during Khrush chevs entire visit to San Fran Pravda correspondents with Khrushchev became lyri cal over California Everyone who travelled on the train from Los Angeles to San Francisco fell in love with the colorful sights of orange groves the blue surface of the ocean and fertile valleys and beautiful Sports Bulletin CLEVELAND Cleve land Indians Wednesday re hired Gordon who had his resignation as field in a tiff with General Frank Lane Minnesota Fair and cooler Highs Thursday 6070 GlobeGazette weather data up to 8 Wednesday Maximum 82 Minimum 49 At 8 54 YEAR AGO Maximum 81 Minimum 65 singers killed last winter was fault of yearold pilot the Civil nautics Board said Wednesday Confused in snow and dark ness and using unfamiliar in struments the pilot apparently thought he was climbing when he was actually descending the board said Killed with pilot Roger Peter son in the chartered light air plane w e re singers Charles Buddy Holly Harding 22 of Lubbock Richard Richie Valens Valenzueia 17 Los An geles and J P Big Bopper Richardson 28 Tex IN A REPORT of his investi gation of the crash near Mason lity last Feb 3 the CAB said he major probable causes Lorimor Man Dies in Crash Hear Ute UTE Donald 50 Lorimor was killed in an automobile accident a mile anc a half south of here in Monona County on Highway 183 Tuesday Ainslie apparently lost control of the car in which hewas alone The car left the highway on a curve and plunged into a ditch MABEE DIES DES MOINES C Mabee 60 former Des Moines police chief died at Veterans Hospital here Tuesday of a heart attack that followed an opera tion for cancer SAME IOWA SAFETV DEPARTMENT FIGURES DUek truffle tm U hMri were 1 The deci sion to start a flight on which ie would have tofly by instru ments whenhe was not erly qualified to do so 2 The pilotsunfamiliarity vith type of gyroscope device which determines the New Skirmishes in North Laos Reported V l army Wednesday reported wide spread skirmishes between ernment troops and Communist guerrilla s a round northern defense headquarters of Sani Neua The army also said that three Black Thai battalions equipped and trained by Com munists movedwithin 20 miles of the U N factfind ing teani reported it was still studying Laotian charges of Communist aggression lowan Indicted on Extortion Charge NEWTON UPI Permit Wickett Colfax was indicted by he grand jury here Tuesday on a charge of making a malicious hreat to extort Wickett was arrested Aug 3 after allegedly calling the James Monroe fami y in Colfax and threatening to harm their children if they didnt pay him 5 Minot Children Die in Home Fire MINOT UPI Five hildren perished Wednesday when fire swept their onestory rame home Mrs Orval New ouse 30 escaped along with hree other children deficiehciiis weathe briefing given Pjeters6n byfUi Federal Aviation Agencys coin mumcalprv traffi communications station At th airport The singers were partofi troupe which had entertained a Clear Lake the night of Feb 2 They were to appear Moor head the following nigh and had chartered the plane to fly to Fargo across the river from VALENS LEFT a San Per riando high school las year to a professiona singer and had just completec his first motion Johnny His first record ing had sold more than amillion Holly star of a group called the reportedly hat made two records that sold more than IVi million copies each Richardson was on leave from a JobVas disc jockey and pro gram director at the Beaumont station KTRM His Clianlilly Lace for a time was rated the played record in the nation crashed five miles north of the ATunici pal Airport five minutes after the 1 i THE CAB SAID Peterson pi lot for a serv ice had failed to pass an FAA instrument flighttest nine the accident Furthermore all the planes in which he had taken instrument training used exactly opposite the new type in the plane which The CAB concluded that the pilot found himself immediate ly after takeoff in an overcast sky with snow falling no def inite horizon and no ground situation in which he wasforced to relysolely on in struments and mainly on the new gyroscopic device The pitch display of this in strument is the reverse of the instruments he was accustomed the CAB said Therefore could have become confused and thought he was making a climbing turn when in reality he was making a descending turn THE FACT that the aircraft struck the ground in a steep j turn but with the nose lowered only slightly indicates that some control was being affected at the Turning to the weather brief ing he CAB was seri ously inadequate in that it failed to even mention adverse flying conditions which should have ily 1 e ad f i 1 o t o ii n der of the that cdn municatofs mayigivepilots in formation and may interpire dataif but are not advise pilots ju any The pilot and the operator n this case had re request and ob ain all the available informa jon and to interpret it correct the board said Peterson was employed by and belonged to Dwy Flying Service owned y Hubert Dwyer operator of he Mason City airport facili ies DES UPI Nikita Khrushchevs challenge to the United States for a contest in the production of corn and meal met approval of Gov Herschei Loveless Tuesday night s a i d he thought Khrushchevs Des Moines speech was probably the leasl controversial of any he has made during his lour of the country The Governor preceded the Soviet leader on the speaking program at the dinner given by het Greater Des Moines Cham ber of Commerce dinner HE RECALLED that begin ning four years ago the Soviet Union and theUnited States ex changed delegations in the agri cultural field and that some of the Americans visiting Russia was Roswell Bob Garst the Coon Rapids farmer who was host to Khrushchev Wednesday Thus Iowa and Iowa people have played a prominent role in the exchange ideas which took Love less said These exchanges have ledto broader exchange in cultural educational and sci entif ic fields between American and citizens of the Soviet Union So in a sense Iowa has le the wajr to more peoplelppeo pie cbntacTsV between our tw breaking crop of 80Q miliioi btisiiels of this year Governor said YOU HAVE spoken in high corn and your need for it inthe Soviet Union May suggest that we will gladly sel you as much as you Loveless said Iowa alsa has attentive to conservation of her fertile soil better ment of her human We have bee n leaders hrough our public school sys em in the conquest of illitera he said We have built utstanding hospitals commun ty centers and institutions of ligher learning We have conr erned ourselves with basic re earch full employment with ealth and welfare progress Our people have been very will h Iowa Looks at Heart KEEPS PACE AP Photofax Nina Khrush who rarely speaks but who is a constant traveling companion of her dons a while coat as she tours the Des Moines Packing Co Wednesday however she had a tour of her own A Coon Rapids automatic laundry a supermarket and a school ing to share what they have with the people of other LOVELESS WHO with Khrushchev from the airppr1 town Tuesday the premier was extremely pleasec with the reception he got here The Governor said he tried to point out some things of inter est in Des Moines such as th new educational television sta at TechnicalHigh Schoo but Khrushchev only wanted t talk farming v out to him as we as Loveless said But1 would guess that during short time hie is here he wont get much chance to see a truly representative Iowa Mrs Loveless rode with Mrs Khrushchev and said the pre miers wife was very relaxed and pleased with the crowd On the Inside General News Page 2 Eat Grow Editorials 4 Society 6789 Clear Lake 13 North Iowa 1MB Meson City News 102223 Latest 27 Comics AP Khrushchev GARST BERATES NEWSMEN Yel guest Russian ing and gesturing Roswell Garst shouts With them is Ambassador Henry Cabot at photographers to clear the row as he walks through a corn field with his Lodge Newsmen were repeated targets of the Coon Rapids farmer of Takes Over Garst Farm ROM OUR WIRE SERVICES COON RAPIDS Soviet Pre mier Nikita Khrushchev Wed nesday patted a wellfed Iowa armers stomach pinched the robust mans cheek and said Ah this is America Khrushchev traveling over gravel roads on a farmtofarm our of rich midwestern corn and cattle lands felt Americas vaistline under sunny skies a man of girth limself saw Donald Walkins a 240pound farmer during one of many stops along the way shortly after he inspected a milesquare field of maturing corn in his quest for the answer o the question of how so American farmers feed so many 10 well AFTER ADMIRING his arms Khrushchev and Roswell Garst his host carried on a brief exchange about God I must admit you are intelli gent Khrushchev said but God helped You are Garst re plied God is on our God is on our side said Khrushchev But we ara growing faster than you God helps those who help said Garst This is an American God helps intelligent peo said as ha closed theexchange Khrushchev is an avowed ath eist and atheism is the policy ofthe Soviet government but he frequently calls in a pious manner upon the deity In his speeches outside his own coun ry THOUSANDS OF persons m iluding school children had ined Highway 141 from Des loines toward Coon Rapids The children waved and cheered or the beaming Communist OSS In small towns along the way many homes were decked with American flags The town of erry population the first Krushchev was to see outside es Moines erected a banner cross the main highway bear ng the word welcome in Russian and adding the infor mation a typical American En route the Khrushchev par y stopped at one of the several Garst farms along the highway where workers were busily har vesting a crop of grain sorghum Khrushchev showed keen in terest in the proceedings He tramped through the field with his host asking Garst all sorts the crop and the machinery used to harvest it KHRUSHCHEVS look of fa tigue began to drop away and was replaced by one of eager ness as he questioned Garst about the methods he used to feed hogs and chickens Near the modest white clap soardGarst home outside Coon Rapids swarms of news radio and television people gathered with their jungle of equipment were converted into tem porary headquarters for news men Television telephone and cable lines were everywhere even around the tall silo Helmeted soldiers of the ifth Army armed with Ml rifles swarmed all over the area of the farmhouse and on sur rounding hilltops at crossroads behind barns and behind pasture ences The parly also stopped at a quare mile section of hybrid orn which Garst was especial y eager for the Soviet boss to ee Garst calls it a mile of a cornfield so finely ultivated it has the look of a garden The only fences are the Mundaries BEFORE PROCEEDING to he Garst home the motorcade arrying Khrushchev and his iarty made a wide circle of the reas farms to give the Soviet Unions top agriculture enthu iast a good close look At each stop vthe scene a me one of confusion in tbt   

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