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Mason City Globe Gazette: Thursday, September 17, 1959 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - September 17, 1959, Mason City, Iowa                                North Iowas Daily Newspaper Edited for ROOM VOL i i The Newspaper That M o k A 11 N o r t h I o wans Ntigkbors un LMM wuw MASOM CITY IOWA THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 17 HOME EDITION Toar Btetla SM La Khrushchevs de K on FATAL CRASH AT CURVE The panoramic view shows the ac cident scene south of Belmond at which Mr and Mrs Charles lyer ison Deadwood S lost their lives The Iversons foreignmade Bfelmond Independent Photo car reportedly pulled out from Highway 3 into the path of the truck which was traveling on Highway 69 Computer Age in Electronic Genius to Have Big Role in Next Decade By VARTANIO VARTAN New York Herald Tribune News Service NEW YORK As 1959 rolls like a reel of magnetic tape to wards the end of its decade the air soon will echo with predic tions by economists sociologists and politicians on the Fabu lous The coming dec ade also is billed variously as the Soaring The Gold en Age of the Sixties and the Spectacular The public will hear that bus iness is going to boom doctors may find a cure for the common cold and the Washington Sen ators just might win a pennant Tabulating the rosy forecasts is a job fit for an electronic brain EXACTLY WHAT ant gray cabinet gadget The electronic ex plains the president of a com putermaking company is a creature of incredible comput ing power and an internal mem ory that puts both women and elephants to In the business world com puters working at lightening speed figure out payrolls con trol inventories route railroad cars run oil refineries and con duct bookkeeping chores The computer has alas yet to pinch a secretary For Uncle Sam the big brain one machine may contain 80 miles of wiring and rent for a day tracks guided mis siles plots war games predicts weather patterns itemizes depot supplies and controls a i r de fense In forecasting the course of the first Sputnik an 704 computer handled six bil lion calculations in six days County to Vote Fri Issue on Cerro Gordo County voters Friday in a special election will decide whether the Board of Supervisors can levy a half mill ax for two years to complete inancing of a new courthouse Polls in Mason City will open from 7 a m to 8 p Polls in the county will open from 8 a m to 8 p m THE BOARD IN the election s asking for authority to levy a tax not to exceed one half xom 7 a elsewhere mill in 1960 and 1961 andfor authority to use the money raised not to exceed for remodeling andconstructing the new courthouse Base bids for constructing and equipping the new courthouse are more than the 600 which the county has on hand for the building The board has made these ex planations The county budget if the ad ditional millage is approved will still be lower than last years THE NEW COURTHOUSE plans cannot be changed enough to cut the cost significantly The board has stressed that the new building will give the the bare minimum space The county needsa new court house and millage levy is not approved the county will lave to build thestructure later at a higher cost they have Two Dead in Crash at Belmond BELMOND A Deadwood S couple was killed instant ly Wednesday afternoon when their car and a truck collided a the intersection of Highways 3 and L The victims were Charles M Atlas Missile in Flight CAPE CANAVERAL Fla UP Atlas intercontinental ange missile newest and dead est addition to the U S de ense arsena thundered ove he Atlantic Wednesday night on successful t e s ight Sources close tothe proj ct said the 85foot missile func oned perfectly and the Sumu te warhead landed near Ascen is this Island in the South Atlantic lowan Found Guilty on Murder Charge WATERLOO UPI Johnnie Lindsey 45 Waterloo was found guilty of second degree murder by a district court jury here late Wednesday Lindsey was accused of hitting Lynn Guy 42 Waterloo over the head with a club in a fight at a party in Luidseys home Aug 16 Guy died later ofa frac tured skull and brain injuries Lindsey will be sentenced later Ambulance Driver Dies So Patient Brings er In FILIPSTAD Sweden ft The sirens went dead the am bulance driver slumped over the wheel The patient inside the am bulance waited Finally after 15 minutes the patient got off his stretch er and staggered to the front of the ambulance The driver was dead apparently of a heart attack Mobilizing all hie strength the patient moved the body and drove the ambulance two miles to the hospital Doctors said the patient is recovering B58 CRASHES FORT WORTH Air Force authorities began an nvestigation that may show whv a B58 Hustler supersonic and burned on akeoff Wednesday night kill ng two crewmen Minuteman Missile in Its First Test EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE Calif Lf The United States newest intercontinental ballistic missile the Minute undergone its first flight test Tethered by feet of nylon cable the Minuteman was fired Tuesday It rose only few hundred feet in the air The second and third stages of he rocket were dummies The Minuteman powered by solid fuel is expected to have a range of more than nautical miles It will be launched from underground silos rail cars trucks and ships Force arid 42 The couples son Kevin 9 was taken unconscious to a Bel mond hospital The driver of the truck Jo seph Moore 49 Tulsa was not injured Witnesses saidthe Iverson car was turning south on High way 69 from Highway 3 and ap parently did STOP sign smashed into the side of the not observe the The truck then car SAME DATEU543S3 KHRUSHCHEV LEAVES The intersection is six miles south of here Iverson had just returned from duty in England He was driving a little foreign car Rain Cold to Continue Rain gloominess and cold were the principal ingredients in Iowas weather mixture Thurs day Rainfall in the 24 hours ended Thursday ranged up to inches at Randolph and manyj The express was preceded 15 points had a quarter of an inch minutes by the troubleshooting of Tour Calls Ike Great Man NEW YORK UPi Soviet Pre mier Nikita Khrushchev hailed President Eisenhower Thursday as a great man who had the courage and wisdom to invite the leader of world communism to the United States am aware some politicians in this country are displeasec by this step taken by the Pres dent of this country but itneec ed man to ahead instead of those who ar unable to see any further tha their the Soviet leade said Khrushchev made re marks at a luncheon in his hon or at the Commodore Hole given by Mayor Robert F Wag ner on behalf of New York City The city welcomed the Soie deader quietly and without par on the secon eg of his tour CONCERNING Eisenho w r the Russian I have always esteemed you President and I dd so to a even greater degree now T have invited Khrushchev to th United States needed wisdom and will power and understand the heed to place the re lations between our countries on a sound Khrushchev arrived at Penn Station byspecial train after a twoday stay as Eisen bowers guest in Washington Fie will return to Wasfnngt6ri or three days of talks on com pletion of his nationwide tour As a motorcade with the Khrushchev party and city offi cials headed for Mayor Wag ners luncheon in the visitors lonor some persons gath red behind police barricades or a glimpse of the party THERE WAS POLITE clap ping from a few persons and an occasional cheer But as he had in Washington Khrushchev got mainly the silent treatment As an extraordinary precau ion the Pennsylvania Railroad stationed maintenance men at every mile of the route on both sides of the track all the way to New York They wore white arm bands Additionally spec ial added guards were placed at intersections Guards we r e stationed throughout his 15car Pennsylva nia railroad express which in cluded three luxurious parlor cars and a glass paneled ob servation lounge Mason City Considerable clout iness through Friday Contin ued cool High Friday lowe 50s Low Thursday upper 30s owa Mostly cloudy and contin ued cool Thursday night an Friday Occasional rain i southwest Thursday night an Low Thursday nigh 45 to 50 High Friday 5360 Further outlook P a r t 1 cloudy and locally a littl warmer Saturday Minnesota Fair and warmer Highs Friday 5565 GlobeGazette weather dat up to Thursday Maximum Minimum At 8 Precipitation 53 41 44 12 Space Ship Flies Under Own Power EDWARDS AFB Calif UPI An experimental X15 manned rocket success fully flashed acrossthe desert under its own power for the first time Thursday in the Kitty Hawk flight for hu man space travel Test pilot Scott Crossfield brought the ship designed to probe the fringe of space to a skidding halt dry Jake bed Fourteen minutes earlier the X15 was released from a B52 bomber flying at feet altitude and its engines cut in for the first time The studwinged airplane half rocket flew to a height of nine miles and traveled about miles an hour on the initial powered flight In the futvre it will hit speeds of up to mph The 15ton rocket craft streaked on a 100mile tri angular course over the Mo jave Desert before Crossfield brought it in for a 200milean hour landing at Rogers Dry Lake With crash and fire trucks standing by Crossfield brought the unwieldly plane in with its nose high in the air to get as much lift as pos sible out of its stubby wings A crowd of reporters and mil itary observers cheered as the plane skidded to a dusty stop On the Inside Washington Remains Intact WHEN THE WORLDS first man flips into outer space in a capsule he will dealwith condi tions that earth were electronic computer simulated warming to their transistors have supplied miss ing words to the Dead Sea Scrolls predicted Presidential races composed musical jin indexed the complete works of St Thomas Aquinas played Cupid by matching a young couple on a television show translated Eng lish into bumpy Braille code and speeded up the scoring in a na tidnal track meet Even the farmer isnt forgot ten A computer picks pedigreed bulls and optimum purebred cows for developing a superior strain of cattle Other machines find the proper balance of pro teins carbohydrates and chloro phyll for cow feed andan elec tronic brain once came up with the process for a tund cheese By W EARL HALL WASHINGTON ital city remains intact Ni kita Khrushchev and his en tourage have come seen and been seen But there is not even one slight sign that there had been any conquering Not a stick or a stone has been moved Take this assurance from an Iowa editor who arrived here just three hours after what only Russian newspa perscould describe as a tu multous welcome HERE I SHOULD explain that my mission here had nothing whatever to do with the visiting Russians I am on a fivemember committee to designate Americas safety man of the arrival while Khrushchev was here was a coincidence Washingtonians turned out in sizable numbers to see the Russian premier but there was a conspicuous v i s i b le reaction Observers agree that Blair House heard more applause for himself than he had heard for Khrushchev along the en tire parade route with Khrushchev Anybody hearing but not seeing his performance at the National Press Club Wednes day could have gained the im pression there was a good bit enthusiasm Those on the scene however sensed that the noise was exclusively from his own cohorts at the n d they were there in large numbers Khrushchev even joined in the applause himself Its assumed that the be havior of those who have had contact with the Communist spokesman here in our na tional capital will be a prece dent and model for crowds at ether points on itinerary including Iowa It has been a notable example of disciplined democracy Our Russian visi tors must be impressed by it MY HOTEL overlooks the Press Club and my strolls have taken me past the Rus sian Embassy and Blair House where the Khrush chevs have been living Tight indeed are the security mea sures I only hope they are as effective elswhere again in cluding Iowa As Khrushchev boarded his train Thursday morning for New York and the there was agreement that he had offered no suggestion of a course of action designed to reduce tension between Rus sia and the free world All in all the image of Ni kita Khrushchev at close range is precisely the same as the image already him by Americans He has run wholly true to form or more Overcast skies prevailed an the day started with tempera tures ranging from 40 degree at Sibley to 47 at Burlington The Weather Bureau said large cool highpressure are will dominate Iowas weather fo the next couple of days Occasional rains were ex sected to continue t h r o u g Thursday with not much in crease in temperatures After noon highs were due to be most the 50s Wednesdays top readings were from 46 at Siou City to 60 at Burlington The outlook was for lows Fri day morning in the upper 30s and lower 40s and afternoon highs in the 50s again The Weather Bureau say might be some local warm ing on Saturday but no genera temperature change is expected Wilson Faces New Threat of Walkout CHICAGO meat in dustry already hit by one strike faces the threat of an other by the weekend The Unit ed Packinghouse Workers said Thursday workers may walk out Saturday at Wilson Co plants if an agreement on a new contract has not been reached by that time Workers have been on the job without a contract since the old contract expired Aug 31 The union has served notice that the contract extension will end Saturday train whose passengers were Secret Service men Soviet sec ret police and railroad detec tives carrying guns instead of luggage General News Page 2 Eat Grow Younger 3 Editorials 4 Society 89 Clear Lake News 13 1 Mason City News 161 North Iowa 18 1920 Latest Markets 26 But No as Yet Major Talks Prepared WASHINGTON WVPresident Eisenhower said Thursday his talks with Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev have ly friendly but it is too early to whether the Kremlin leader las changed his mind on any world issues The President told a news conference that Khrushchevs manner and deportment indicate he really is trying to reach agreement regarding interna tional problems This was Eisenhowers first meeting with newsmen since his one hour and 45 minute formal conference with the Soviet chief Tuesday and his talks with Khrushchev at social events THE question put to he President was whether he sees any concrete evidence on the basis of the talks that Khru shchev may have changed his position on international issues Eisenhower replied that it is Still a little bit early to go into detail or come to any conclu sions on that matter He went on to however that Khru shchevs general attitude has been extremely friendly Eisenhower and Khrushchev will meet again Sept 2427I for another round of talks at the Presidents mountain retreat Thurmont K AP Photofax SIGHTSEER Premier Khrushchev smiles and gestures as he talks with Henry Cabot Lodge left foreground during the train ride from Washington to New York Also taking in the sights are Soviet Ambassador Menshikov U S Ambassador to Russia Llewellyn Thompson and Alexander Kolovsky in terpreter In he meantime Khrushchev vill cross country rip and seen something mora f the United States and its peo le Eisenhower said his first con srence with Khrushchev dealt ith the matter of agenda for le Camp Davidconferences nd also brought a mutual re tatement of general position egarding the issues A BIT LATER at the newt onference Eisenhower made t clear that such specific prob ems as West Berlin and the Communist drive in Laos cer ainly will be on the Camp David agenda As for the public reception Chrushchev received in Wash ngton Eisenhower remarked hat the crowds did show what e termed reservation He indi ated he feels that was to be xpected in view of the differ nces between the United States nd Russia on specific prob ems and general government nlosophy A major part of the 30minute news conference was devoted to the Khrushchev visit and re lated matters But the President also dealt with these other topics CONGRESS By and large Eisenhower said a great deal of good was accomplished dur ing the justadjourned first ses sion of the 86th Congress con trolled by the Democrats But the President did cut oose with some sharp criticism also called it unfortunate hat control of the government still is divided between the Re publicans and the Democrats Eisenhower spoke out most harply in discussing what he called the refusal of Congress to luthorize removal of interest eiling on long term govern ment bonds That refusal he eclared was one of the most erious things that has hap ened in a long time Eisenhower was asked about tie possibility of his calling Congress back for a special ses ion on the interest rate issue le replied it is a matter he vould want first to give very areful study And he noted that Congress will be back in regu ar session in a little more than iree months from now EDITOR DIES HOUSTON Tex Watts 55 an employe of tha ptston Chronicle 32 years and lanaging editor the last 11 ied Wednesday of a heart ail icnt He was elected secretary the Associated Press Man ging Editors Assn a month V I j   

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