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Mason City Globe Gazette: Tuesday, September 15, 1959 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - September 15, 1959, Mason City, Iowa                                North lowot Daily Newspaper Edited for VOL HOME EDITION The Newspaper That Mokes AM North I o wans Neighbors MASON CITY IOWA TUESDAY Nit Khrushch ss WASHINGTON MCongress closed out its long aneUfor the Democratic frustrating 196B session early Tuesday Final adjournment six hours before Soviet Pre mier Nikita Khrushchev landed in Washington The House quit at and the always more leisurely Senate hurried to quit three minutes later ending the longest continuous session since the Korean War year of 1951 The weary legislators leftbe hind a heavy load of business for their 1960 national election session startingnext Jan 6 The final adjournment just before Khrushchevs scheduled arrival pleased some of the members who sought to make sure there would be no occasion for an address by the Premier to the Congress NWStates BiirOKd by Ike Minnesota will no longer be able to levy income taxes against the Northwestern States Portland Cement Co for cement sold in that state President Eisenhower has signed a bill exempting such business from taxation by another state passed by Congress was the result of a Supreme Court decision last Feb 24 It held that the tax was not unconstitutional or in re straint of interstate trade as by the cement was claimed company NORTHWESTERN States still will have to pay several hun dred thousand dollars of in come taxes to ever Gen Hanford MacNider president of the firm reported Tuesday Taxes from 1933 the present were okayed by the Supreme Court decision The tax from toIMS amounted to according to thesuit which went to Ihe FOR THE SENATE adjourn ment ended a hour session starting at 9 Monday to clean up the final business of the first session of the 86th Congress Congress final action was to appropriate for foreign aid and about 400 mil lion dollars for miscellaneous other purposes The aid total 330 million less than Congress had authorized in an earlier bill was a compromise of Sen ate and House figures Also approved as part of the bill was a twoyear extension of the life of the Civil Rights Commission otherwise due to die in November It was given in new funds to con tinue its work in the next year The sessions end was de layed by a lengthy conference on the foreign aid bill onto which had been tacked num ception POMP AND CEREMONY FOR PREMIER KHRUSHCHEV ARROW AT WASHINGTON AIRPORT AP Photofax ber of cleanup money matters 10 uiesun wmcQ wentiu Supreme Court Sales in Minneland the Civil Rights Commis sota by the Iowa company have sipns action bit been considerably heavierin the terty opposed by Southern sen 10 years since MacNider said Nikita May U N Move id IN UPHOLDING the taxing authorities of Minnesota against the Mason City firm Gen Mac Nider pointed out the high court had authorized all 35 slates with income tax laws to assess taxes against every firm doing business within that state Hundreds of thousands of firms would have been affected he said although the majority of them were not yet being taxed and so were unaware of what was ahead for them All income from business transacted across state lines was taxable under the Supreme Court ruling Gen MacNider flew to Wash ington Thursday Aug 27 in order to discuss the bill with members of the Senate and House conference committee Despite the usual summer evac uation of the capital over the weekend most of the confer ees had been approached by Monday morning PROBABLY THE most note worthy acts of the 1959 session were to admit Hawaii as the 50th state and to pass a far THAT DAY tht conference committee approved the bill which subsequently was passed byboth houses of Congress and signed by the President It completely reverses implication of Courts decision in our said Gen MacNider although it could not be made retroactive as far as action reaching labor regulation bill But the list of major bills left over forwhat miist be a far shorter session next year is longer than the roll of 1959 ac complishments Congress then will be driving for an early July adjournment in advance of the con vention meeting July 11 in Los Angeles The headover list includes civil rights a general farm bill aid to education minimum wage legislation aid for de pressed areas broadening of social security and perhaps general tax revision Bing Crosby Joyous against us was concerned We can expect no recovery of what we were forced to pay in taxes penalties and interest earlier this year while the high courts ruling was in effect We believe that all was ac complished that could have been hoped for in the last hectic days of this On the Inside General News 2 Editorials 4 Comics Society News North News 10 13U Mason City News le17 Latest Markets 19 Clear Lake News 29 Farm News 21 WELCOME NICKY SAN MATEO Calif MVWhen Nikita Khrushchev drives along Bayshore Freeway next Monday hell see a sign erected for him by a housing development In English and Russian it reads Every person in this new Los Prados neighborhood is a free happy home of His First Daughter LOS ANGELES er Bing Crosby father of five sons let out a joyful wahoo Monday night at Queen of Angels the Hospital when his wife actress the Supreme Kathy Grant gave birth to their first daughter You could hear him the length of the said an attendant And the corridor is about two blocks The 55yearold singer took his 24yearold wife to the hospital at Monday Two hours later she gave birth to a 6pound 15ounce girl The couple named the child Mary Frances They have one other child Harry Lillis Crosby III born at the same hospital Aug 8 1958 C r o s b y s four grown sons were by his mar riage to bis first wife the late Dixie Lee Swift Offers Work to Any of Strikers CHICAGO UPI Swift Co said Tuesday it has jobs for any of its striking work ers willing to return to their plants The nations largest meatpacker said it is not re opening its strikebound plants but workers are free to return and some already have How ever officials of the striking United Packinghouse Workers and Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen unions claimed there was no discon entment among the strikers UNITED NATIONS NY UFi The General Assembl opened its 14thsession Tuesday a mid speculation that Soyie Premier Nikita Khrushchev is preparing a dramatic surpris as part of his speech here Fri day Diplomats familiar with So viet thinking expressed doub that Khrushchev would pass up an opportunity suchas this without a new proposal which would grab worldwide head tines SOME SUCH MOV E was hinted at by Soviet Deputy Foreign Minister Vasily V Kuz netsov who said on his arrival in New York that this Assembly might well be a turning point Kuznetsov will head the Soviet delegation after the departure of Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko Delegates recalled that Presi dent Eisenhower in an address before the Assembly in 1953 caused a world sensation by proposing an international atomsforpeace agency This has since then become a real ity THERE WAS NO indication as to what sort of proposal Khrushchev might make SCHOOL IS SCENE f F pVYTC f Vm Vf Tex explosionpblice said off b a homemade the Poe Elementary School Tuesday Pblice dispatcherssaid at least five children and two adults were tilled and at least 18 injured The FBI calledin after teachers and students said a man carrying a suitcase was on the campus at the time of the explosion Some of them have their legs blown saic Mrs Cora Bryan former Houston Chronicle reporter vho lives nearby They lorribly Police said one body was that f carrying a suit ase on the campus THE INJURED included Mrs E Doty the principal who was rushed to a hospitalfor mergency surgery The allwhite school has had o integration troubles There were conflicting reports s to whether the explosion oc urred in the kitchen or in a allway at the rear of the build ng POLICE TOLD me a man ame into the hallway with a uitcase and about that time explosion said ohn Harris Houston Chroni e reporter who arrived at the scene shortly after the explo sion Mrs D L Hunt a teacher said a boy came running to her during recess and said there was a man in the schoolyard with a suitcase with a button The student quoted the man as saying he was going to punch the button Mrs Hunt said she and anoth er teacher started to evacuate fhe children but the explosion occurred before they could get out of the building GOULD DIES NEW YORK Ml Howard Sould 88 last surviving son of inancier Jay Gould died Mon day after a long illness Mason City Clearing and cold er Tuesday night lows 3842 Mostly fair and day highs creasing Tuesdaynight bu remaining fresh from Iowa Partly cloudy and cooler Tuesday night and Wednes day with fresheasterly winds LowsTuesday night38 north to 48 south Highs Wednesday 56 north to 68 south Further outlook Partly cloudy cool with chance of light rain southwest Thursday Minnesota Frost warning Part ly cloudy continued cool Highs Wednesday 4555 GlobeGazette weather data up o 8 am Maximum 81 Minimum 49 At 8 49 Precipitation trace Confirms Two North Iowa Postmasters WASHINGTON UPI The enate Tuesday confirmed 15 owa postmasters as the upper ouse sped toward adjournment ncluded were Donald E Chris an West Bend and Wayne H Two Rocket Experiments Called Off CAPE CANAVERAL Fla Ufi countdown reached zero Tuesday oh the last of the Van guard rockets but an attempt to launch it with a 100pound satellite was abandoned because of undisclosed technical difficul ties An informed source said the firing button was pressed but failed 16 send the necessary sig nal to the ignition system IT WAS TROUBLE that could nt be fixed quickly so the Van guard crew decided at a m to go home and try again lat er There was no immediate de cision on when that will be The satellite included a 50 pound payload and the 50pound third stage of the rocket which will remain attached to the sat ellite Its job will be to measure the earths magnetic field solar Premier in Plane Lands Off Schedule By WILLIAM L RYAN WASHINGTON Soviet Premier Nikita S Khrushchev began his historic American visit today with an appeal for good neighborly relations be tween Communist and capitalist states and a sharp reminder that the Soviet Union had beat en the United States in the to the moon President Eisenhower wel coming Khrushchev told the chubby Communist leader the United States could never launch an aggressive war be cause the American people rule the country and are devoted to aeace Khrushchev later drove hrough dignified crowdpacked streets which applauded politely jut raised scarcely a cheer of welcome There were no inci dents welcoming speech was the clear implica tion that Russia has ho such builtin restraints against ag gression THE SOVIET Premier ar rived by plane at Andrews Air Force Base near Washington after a 12hour flight Moscow Headwinds delayed the big Russian turboprop plane the arrival in sunnycool weath er was almost 45 minutes late While a curious but quiet crowd on at the airfield the seriousfaced rSoviet leader icard the President express the lopesof the United States for a just universal and enduring The two men thus began in he very first moments of their exchange of visits a struggle for the support of world public opinion Khrushchevs reference to his nations success in putting a capsule on the moon with the hammer and sickle emblem was a frank boast of Soviet prowess in science Almost jn so many wordshe told the Pres ident that American science would get to the moon sooner or later too IT WAS A momentous in the gleaming sunlight In a Xrays and the more dangerous senso two worlds were meeting pockets of radiation around enmng Latimer which man will want to detour when he flies to the moon TROUBLE IS no stranger to the Vanguard program A vic tim of circumstances the slim 72foot rocket has been plagued with technical difficulties since its beginning Three hours after the Van guard postponement the power ful engine of a Jupiter interme diate range missile ignited but the big rocket failed to get off the ground A malfunction oc curred causing the engine to cut off automatically while still on the launching an offi cial said The Jupiter was to carry a veritable zoo of small animals into space Fourteen pregnant mice and two frogs were among the biological specimens put into the nose cone of the intermedi ate range ballistic missile It was to have soared 300 miles high and miles downrange er for the first before had a master of Soviet commu nism set foot on the United States When the Presidents welcom ing remarks were translated the Premier applauded Then smiling he approached the microphone donned his spectacles and said should be no obstacles to good relations between the two coun tries He said he had come to the United States with open heart and good In referring to the Soviet tri umph over the weekend in planting a rocket on the moon Khrushchev said Our earth has become somewhat lighter while the moon has gained some hundred pounds of Polite applause greeted his remarks Khrushchev brought with him a duplicate of the Soviet moon pennant to present to Eisenhow across the Atlantic MAIDEN VOYAGE MOSCOW WVThe Soviet atomic icebreaker Lenin sailed Tuesday on its first cruise Tass News Agency re ported The power vessel was launched Sataurday PREMIER KHRUSHCHEV WfFE IN CAR WITH IKE AS PARADE STARTS SAME 41OW A SAFETY OEr riGUKEIl Hack mtmmt hi M A crowd of men women and children which had grown steadily since the morning lined the waisthigh fence around an airfield decked with breeze whipped American and Red So viet flags EISENHOWER hadwalked to the end of the taxiing strip when the plane was spotted in the distance and was waiting there when it came to a stop A mill tary brass band blared tial air as the planes doors opened and the beaming Soviet leader emerged A 21gun salute sounded The two most powerful leaders in the world shook lands Smiling Khrushchev waved lis homburg hat as he and the President walked toward hardwood polished platf or m nearby for the form art ing ceremonies The two   

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