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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - September 7, 1959, Mason City, Iowa                                North lowot Daily Newspaper Edited foe DM HOME EDITION VOL W Tlit Ail North lowqns MASON CITY IOWA MONDAY SEPTEMBER 7 1f5f Copy One Mans Opinion A Rtdto W EARL HALL GiolMGasttte tdrtor BROADCAST SCHEDULE COLO UM WOL WTAD MM Ttara WSDI CMy bt Pretty Liyc MAY REMEMBER that typically cocky boast once made by Nikita Khrushchev We will bury you He was re ferring to the United States and in the context of the boast Khrushchev was saying that Russians not only superior to the United States in arms but in the near future would be out producing and outselling the United States in the world Such bragging leads logically to the Question Is Russia gain ing ground on us on the eco nomic front and if so how fast An outstanding business man Edwin Vennard vice president and managing director of the Edison Electric Institute has an answer to that question With a group of electric pow er officials Vennard went to Russia for a closeup look at Communisms power industry Vennard and all of his associ ates have an intimate Ac quaintance with power genera tion and power distribution in America None would doubt their Qualification to make some valid comparisons between our electrical industry and Russias OFTEN ITS STATED and I believe it to be true that a na tions power is one of the best possible indices to measure in dustrial progress Without a large supply of electrical energy largescale industrial develop ment is impossible If electrical power capacity is showing a rapid it can be assumed that the nation js experiencing a brisk industrial growth The reason for this of course is that electrical power does so very many things It runs fac lories But just as important in toto it also operates appliances and gadgets in the home I I J tij UW J makes possible an increasing special significance It means a day of rest arid relax demand for those things raise our standard of living This tour to Russia by Ven nard and his electric power group was therefore of more than ordinary importance 1 provided much more valuable information than a group of gov ernors could acquire it seems quite obvious Not so long ago Vennard dis tilled his findings into ah ad dress A copy of that talk is be fore me as I prepare this com mentary Ill be drawing on it very heavily IN THEIR 16 DAYS in Vennard and his associates traveled miles by automo bile railroad and chartered bus Everywhere the people gave the impression of being more than willing even eager to tell the Americans all they knew There was no holding back By the same token they were eager to learn about America how we do things how we live and all the rest Thnwghout the Ven nard stated we found the sians to be competent in to send a factfinding mission to troubled the field of electric power men wemet in the power stations both at the top and in the sup porting levels gave every evi dence of being able scientists and In my own visit to Russia I found a great friendliness on the part of rank and file Russians but I must say I was not this much impressed by their competence NOW WE COME to the tion of whether Russia is catch ing up with us in the power field And its the view of Ed win Vennard of Edison Electric Institute the gap is very great and that it is not being reduced The total installed power ca pacity in the USSR at the end of 1957 was 48 million kilowatts n revival 01 uie uuuuaui susjsrs time We led Russia by 98 mil lion kilowatts of generating ca pacity What about the trend Is Russia catching up with us According to the findings of Vennard and his associates in the four years ending in 1961 the U S will have installed about 50 million kilowatts of Forjackhamiher operator Glair Shirley Kopps plasterer Floyd Easley and paylbader operator Bill Connelly left to Labor Day in Mason City has GlobeGazette Photos by Musser ation from their regular jobs But Art Holtrnaii its just another Holtman former GlobeGazette pressroom is retired Mission to Laos Goal of fair and hot through Tuesday Highs 88 95 Lows Monday night 66 74 The outlook for Wednesday shows some showers across the state and coolertempera cures UNITED NATIONS N Y Temperatures The United States spearheaded a move Monday to call on the Laos The U S delegation and sev eral others were expected to sub mit a resolution proposing such a mission to the council meeting on Laos plea for a emerg ency force to meet any aggres sion from Communist North Viet NORTH VIET NAM Monday said it had asked the to re ject Laos request for a orce and branded it illegal The government of thedemor cratic Republic of Yiet Nam is sighly indignant at these ac said the Red Viet Nam News Agency It points out that he deepseated root of the pres ent tension in Laos is the inter ference of the United States aimed at turning this country nto one of its military bases and seriously threatening the peace of Viet Nam IF THE SOVIET Union should veto the resolution actfinding mission the spon iors could get an emergency ses ion of the General Assembly within 24 hours by a vote of any seven of the 11 countries on the council Some diplomats said they had word the Russians had drafted a resolution of their own favor ng revival of the dormant Ca independence in ELECTION SOUGHT aooui ou million ui LONDON Minister and relatives dropped in Mon new capacity This is more than Macmilian went to visit day to wish happy birthday Russias total capacity in 1957 en Elizabetn jn Scotland b Mrs Anna Mary Robertson Soviet program i calls for and asked her to call Moses better known to primi tfce installation of 60 million ad lectiong for a ncw British Partive art Enthusiasts as Grand CONTINUED ON PAGE 2 liament ma She is 99yearsold for the fiveday period Tues day through Saturday will av erage 7 to 9 degrees above normal Norihal highs 7781 normal lows 5457 Cooler Thursday and Friday Pre cipitation will average around 65 of an inch occurring as showers and thunderstorms Wednesday and Thursday Globe Gazette weather data up to 8 Monday 89 68 75 Maximum Minimum At 8 YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum 71 47 Daylight Time to End Tuesday in Minnesota UPI Daylight Saving Time and controversial issue ends in Minnesota at 2 a m Tuesday Fast time will bow out quiet ly in contrast to the headline grabbing attention it received when it staggered into effect under the fuzzy laws then on the statute books One result was that Atty Gen Miles Lord was censured by the State Supreme Court for ignor ing court orders Were at Iowa State Fair DES MOINES sum mer polio epidemic and a con flict with the opening of school have been blamed for the drop in attendance at the 1959 Iowa State Fair which ended Sunday night At estimated per sons attended the fair Sunday bringing the 1959 total to about a decrease of conference agreements for from the 1958 lofcl This years total is low a n 0 maepcnuentc JM Indo China Laos opposes since 1940 fair officials said plan So does the United Tt EAGLE BRIDGE N Y UPI A few close friends AP FACES CHARGE Actress Jayne Mansfield shown with her 8monthold son faces an official complaint at Black pool England for parading the boy before yelling crowds at an afterdark festival The National Society for the Pre vention of Cruelty to Children charged No child of that age should take part in publicity stunts especially at that time of night To which the blonde beauty replied Nonsense the boy had been well rested up for the 200 Punks Rounded Up in New York City NEW YORK in the nations largest city contin ued their roundup of youthful i o 1 u m s Monday in the steppedup drive to cut the youthful wave of violence high lighted by last weeks wanton killing of two youngsters Unrest in Nation on Labor Day WASHINGTON 111 feeling between U S workers and their employers is growing and the 54day old steel strike proves it top labor spokesmen de clared Monday in special Labor Day statements On the other hand President Eisenhower issued a statemenf stressing the giant gains made by Americanlabor in Ihe 20tli century SECRETARY OF LABOR James P Mitchell agreeing with the Presidents estimate of progress added that labor should move forwardand try to raise the low economic status of the migrant farm worker Two issues rankled labor lead ers as they tried to marshal un ion strength on the nations 55th Labor Day Oneissue was the new labor control bill The oth er was increased resistance by employers to union demands for higher wages an issue empha sized by the steel strike MIGHT as well be called antilabor said James B Carey president of the International Union of Elec trical Workers and a vice pres ident of the AFLCIO But the AFL CIO officially named the day Support the Steelworkers Day in a move to help the steel workers who have been on strike for eight weeks George Meany president of the AFLCIO said labor would have to fight big business with anew program of education and political power Big business leaders are do ing everything in their power to weaken and destroy our trade union Meany said in a statement HOUSE RANSACKED HOLLYWOOD UPI The home of actress Anna Maria Al berghetti was ransacked and looted of worth of jewelry sometime Sunday Iowa Holiday Toll Now 14 Sessions on Labor Day WASHINGTON Demo cratic Leader Lyndon B John son of Texas maneuvered Mon day for holiday action on Senate legislation despitethe threat of timeconsuming talk by Sen Wayne Morse Both the Senate and the Labor Day working sessions for the first time since 1942 in the first World War 11 Johnsons trump card in his battle against Morses holiday delaying tactics was a unani mous consent agreement to lim it debate on a bill to extend the farm surplus disposal program ALTHOUGH MORSE could force some delays the farm surplus measure was officially before the Senate Thisap peared possible to block the Ore gon senators announced inten tion to read to his colleagues a threevolume history of the la bor movement The surplus disposal measure laid aside Saturday while tics passed a bill to the federal fnbih3 Scents a gallon effective Oct The measure designed to as sure financing of the federal highway construction program goes back to the House for con sideration of Senate changes Numerous Senate amend ments to thesurplus disposal bill still must be acted upon But debate on each is limited to 30 minutes under the agree ment and the delays Morse could force on this bill thus were limited THE HOUSE had no such trouble on itsworking holiday It arranged a session to dispose of a batch of relatively minor bills and thus pave the way for more important legislation later in the week Tuesday it takes up a second round public works appropriation bill almost draw another veto in its present form Therevised bill contains funds for more than 60 new projects to which President Eisenhower objected when he vetoed an earlier meas ure Some members of Congress were convinced that Morses tactics would force abandon ment of the adjournment goal and run the sessions into next week when Soviet Premier Ni kita Khrushchev arrives here PLANS TRIP WASHINGTON of Agriculture Ezra Taft Benson announced Monday that he will leave Sept 23 on a European trade tour including visits to the Soviet Union and Poland AP Photofax GWENN DIES Edmund Gwenn Academy Awardwin ning actor best known for his characterizations of kindly humorous old men died Sun day at Hollywood at the age of 81 Confined to a wheelchair for almost two years the cause of death was given as complications of pneumonia Charles City Boy Victim of Tractor CHARLES Lee Bill 11 son of Mr and Mrs Harvey Bill was killed Sunday on the farm where the family lives 2Yz miles south eastiof was packing silage with a tractor He drove too close to the edge of the silage and the tractor tipped over The fender of the tractor caught him on the neck and he died instant ly of a broken neck David who was in Ihe sev enth grade in junior high school here is survived by his par ents nine brothers and sisters Nancy Larry Kenneth Judy Roy Janice Mary Jean Clay ton and Vickie Mae and his grandparents Mr and Mrs Fred Bill Charles City and Glenn Chambers Marble Rock Funeral arrangements are In complete at the Hauser Funeral Home here Polio Deaths in Iowa Reach 13 for Year DBS MOINES lowans died of polio over the weekend bringing the polio death toll for the year Lo at least 13 The lat est victims were Mrs Irene Sego 38 Fort Dodge and For rest Wise 39 Des Moines SAME OOWi MFETI DEPARTMENT FIGUBESI Slaying Suspect Breaks Down During Grilling EAST LANSING Mich UTI Exconvict Alvin Knight un der constant questioning for more than 24 hours in disap pearance of State Trooper Albert agreed Monday to accompany state police to show where nSebody Grant said Knight apparently broke down after hours of questioning and after a dramatic interview with Soudens wife who pleaded with him to tell what had happened to her hus band Ill pray for you and forgive you but please Clara Souden 23 mother of a sevenmonthold baby told Knight Trooper Albert Souden 29 disappeared last Thursday after geing to question Knight about a burglary at a factory Knight told Mrs Souden Im sorry for you and your baby but cant do anything for Then he choked back tears This isnt any indication Im he said Im sorry for Arrested Friday in a northern Michigan cabin Knight ad mitted being in the troopers ear Thursday But he insisted he knew nothing of what happened to the trooper He had Sou dens service revolvtr He said he bought it for from hitchhiker Among Dead Fourteen persons were killed onIowas jammed Broads and highways in the first two days of the Labor Day of the most tragic recordsfrn the states history S a f the may worse before of motorists return frofnr holiday trips Mon day night the Associated Press reported By Saturday the toll passed last years threeday total of nine deaths Four lowansp have been drowned since the holiday week end began at 6 Friday ONE OF THE DEAD was a North lowan James Robert Ab bey 26 Decorah He died Sun day night at a Charles City hos pital of injuries suffered Satur day in a cartruck collision on the Little Cedar bridge six and a half miles east of Charles City Abbeys car and a truck enby John Metz 32 Osage sideswiped in the middle of the bridge Metz wasstill in the pital with National Toll Easily Could Hit Record High BT THE ASSOCIATED PRESS A fastmoving death toll on the highways climbed Mon day as the nation entered the last 24 hours of a grim Labor Day weekend The National Safety Council called for a definite improve ment in behavior and said the toll might other wise approach its alltime high of 453 set in 1951 By 11 there had been 322 traffic deaths T9 boating fatalities 33 nonb o a t i n g and 53 deaths from miscellaneous causes for total of 427 He is reported in good condi tion Abbey a graduate of Decorah High School was employed by the Oliver Corp at Charles City He is survived by his mgllier Bertha Teslow Decorah a brother Johnr Chicago and a sister Joan Minneapolis Fu neral arrangements are pending at the Steine Funeral Home De corah The traffic toll was headlined by a twocar crash near Win throp Saturday which patrolmen described as one ofthe worst they had seen Five persons were killed in the accident THE DEAD WERE Edward A Kohlmeyer 67 Round Lake his wife 65 Gertrude L Mann 46 Round Lake a pas senger in Kohlmeyers car Mrs Bernice Anita Peters 31 Grundy Center believed to be the driver of the car which col lided with the Kohlmeyer car and Lloyd law of Mrs Peters and one of seven passengers in her car Alvin Belt 15 Council Bluffs was killed early Monday on a country road near Manawa when the car in which he was riding went out of control Two persons were killed Sun day Royal Klitz 31 Savannah died of injuries suffered when a tire on his car blew out and sent the vehicle into the ditch on Highway 64 about two miles west of Sabula JAMES F EIGHT 14 of near in a Des Moines hospital of injuries suffered when he stepped from a car in front of his farm home into path of another automobile Mrs Lois Heitmeier Omaha and her son Charles 12 died   

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