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Mason City Globe Gazette: Wednesday, June 25, 1958 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - June 25, 1958, Mason City, Iowa                                North Iowas Daily Newspaper Edited fax HOIM THI NEWSPAPER T H A T M A K E A L L N 6 R T H 10 WANS HE I CM I 0 R HOME EDITION VOL LXIV Associated and United Presi International Full Lerfse Wlrer 7c a Copy MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY JUNE Paper TWO Sec m Dem t U S Emb A AP Photofax DISMISSED Dismissed from the witness stand after a tangle with House proberswas J Sin clair Armstrong former Secur ities and Exchange Commission chairman Armstrong said he was about reports that his group had been influ in the Bernard Goldfine case RANK 25TH Buying Power of lowans MOINES Iowa De velopment Commission reported that Iowa slipped from 21st to 25th in the nation in per capita effectivebuying income and that its amount is below the national average The commission said Iowas ef fective buying power per capita in 1957was The national average was Iowa ranked third in the seven state WestNprth Central area and bi the Mississippi River However only two of the stateswhich border on iowaihad a lower per capita buying income thair Iowa These are Nebraska and South The states fig ores are Illinois Missouri Wisconsin and Min nesota The commission said this was the first time in several years that Iowas total declined In the pre vious survey year Iowa ranked 2lst with a figure of Polk County had the highest per capita income in Iowa Scott was second Black Hawk third and Linn fourth Cerro Gordo ranked ninth The definition of per capita ef fective buying income is in ef fect the money available for spending by every man woman and child Roger Dreyer of Fenton to Head Iowa 4H Clubs AMES Dreyer 18 Fenton Wednesday was elected president ofthe state 4H Boys Clubs He is the son of Mr and Mrs E H Dreyer and he has been in 4H work for six years Roger Tempers Flare at Inquiry ExSEC Boss Outraged WASHINGTON tflThe Gold fineAdams investigation exploded into an angry row Wednesday climaxed by dismissal of a for mer Securities and Exchange Commission chairman from the witness stand J Sinclair Armstrong SEC chairman in 195557 and now an assistant secretary of the Navy tangled from the outset with Chairman Oren Harris DArk of the House subcommittee digging into SEC handling of cases in volving Bernard Goldfme a Bos ton industrialist The Congress members want to know whether SEC pulled Its punches and whether it was in fluenced by Sherman Adams top aide to President Eisenhower and a close friend of Goldfine IVE BEEN OUTRAGED at allegations thaf SEC people could possibly be influenced by anybody Armstrong hotly told the congressmen Harris asked the former SEC chief to step aside and not re sume the witness stand until Har ris returned from another com mittee meeting the congressman was about to attend He said he had some questions to ask per sonally Armstrong kept right on Ive been waiting for two years to make this he said in been this com ittee atvthe beginning 6f every Congress shor backHarris Well what have we talked DREYER tanelle vice was president of the K o s s u t h County 4H Clubs and was honored as the countys o u t standing 4H boy Other offi c e r s elected were David Nichols 19 Fon president Merrill Oster 17 Cedar Falls secretary and James Howard 18 Odebolt historian The 4H short course at Iowa State College ends Thursday EXPLORER DIES SAN JOSE Calif der Malcolm Sandy Smith 99 famed Alaskan prospector and ex plorer died Tuesday about asked Armstrong BANGING HIS GAVEL Harris sent Armstrong from the witness chair There were indications the sub committee would deal gingerly with a question that bobbed up Tuesday whether Goldfine be stowed favors on federal judges Eobert W Lishman counsel for the subcommittee which has heard of Goldfines beneficence to presidential aide Sherman Adams and some Republican senators said any evidence he has on gifts to judges will remain locked in his files until the committee di rects otherwise Representatives John E Moss John Bell Williams CD Miss and John B Bennett R Mich all said Goldfine would be asked when he testifies next week about a report that he paid a ho tel bill for Federal Judge William against SCENE OF DEMONSTRATIONS Scene of the latest demonstrations in Moscow was the U S Embassy top Russians gathered in retaliation for demonstrations by Hungarian refu gees last week outside the Soviet consul ate in New York The bottom photo shows i AP Photofax K H Knoke West Germancounsellor in Moscowr sitting placidly in his littered office with debris from a more violent outbreak Monday coveting the floor Plac ards carried by the Russian demonstra tors were hurled through windows Lebanese Rebels Attack U S Hospital Push May Be On FROM OUR WIRE SERVICES BEIRUT Lebanon Lebanese rebels attacked the American Presbyterian Hospital in Tripoli Wednesday The hospitals Amer ican staff had left The attack started shortly be fore UN SecretaryGeneral Dag REDSTONE LAUNCHED CAPE CANAVERAL Fla An Army Redstone ballistic mis sile has completed another appar T McCarthy of Boston But Moss cautioned drawing any hasty conclusion ently highly successful t r i p that would undermine public conthrough space The huge Red fidence in the courts Rep Morstone capable of striking a tar gan Moulder DMo said the Set more than 500 miles away courts are not directly connected with extreme accuracy blasted to the subcommittees assigned awai a fiery show of power task of looking into operations of Tuesday night federal regulatory agencies Hammarskjold outwardly oplimthe burning of two US Infornia istic about his Middle East peacetion Service libraries early in the making mission left for York The rebels sent the army New rebellion lt coincided by President Camille Chamoun 4WW44J O11J1V v JU guards at the hospital a note tellthat he would call for militarj ing them to get out or well blow aid under the United Nation it up The hospitals staff moved charter ifhis proWestern govern to Beirut six weeks ago IT WAS THE first direct attack o nooert on US property in Lebanon since McCIintlock promptly appealed to ment needs help to cope with rebels U S Ambassador Robert G BULLETIN MOSCOW Soviet Union announced Wednesday it was withdrawing from the July 1 Geneva conference on nuclear test suspension SAM Private Phone Line Rates Ordered Cut WASHINGTON Federal Communications Comm i s s i o Wednesday ordered American Telephone Telegraph Co to cut its rates for private telephone line service by about 15 per cent The order becomes effective in 60 days Privately leased telephone cir cuits are widely used by govern ment agencies stock brokers banks large industries and oth ers The order does not affect the telephone service used by the general public or telegraph serv ices maintained by or wire circuits supplied to TV and radio stations for program trans mission Nashua Voters Pass Park Bond Issue a special election here Tuesday voters approved 394218 a bond issue of It is to be used for the purchase of the area on the Cedar River north on Highway 218 known as Cedar Lake The tract is to be developed as a park and will be used for boating iwimming and picnics TRUCK SANDWICH Looking something batch of lettuce caught between two slices of stale bread is this truck loaded with pine stumps The driv er John Harpison Pensacola Fla ran over the end of an open draw bridge on PensacoTa Bay and became lodged this way Harpison who wasnt hurt said his brakes failed with astatemen Chamoun for assurance the hos ital would get adequate protec iion IN BEIRUT ITSELF heavy firing broke out shortly after the government announced it hac asked for an armed UN emer gencyforce to seal off the fron tier President Chamoun said he ex Elected a big rebel push agains his proWestern government a any hour but It was too soon t say whether this was it The heaviest firing was heard in Ghandak Ghamik on the out skirts of the Basta section of Bei rut where rebel forces under for mer Premier Saeb Salam are en trenched inside barricades Injuries Fatal to Hampton Man IOWA CITY Ml Joseph H Typer 66 Hampton died at Urn versity Hospitals here Tuesda night of injuries received in twocar collision in Waverly las Saturday night Typers wife who was ridin with him escaped injury The driver of the other car Herman G Bruch 69 Waverly suffered only minor injuries Rep Talle Breaks Ankle in Tumble WASHINGTON Rep Henr 0 Talle RIowa broke his lef ankle last week when he slippe on wet steps He was taken t Bethesda Naval Hospital wher doctors said the break was no serious Crowds Mostly Orderly Signs Hung on Building MOSCOW crowd of more han 1000 Russians some angrily shaking their fists and shouting oul epithets demonstrated Wed nesday at the US Embassy About 150 Soviet policemen kept the crowd under control One creaming Russian hurled a itone through an open window ut there was no damage U S Ambassador Llewellyn Thompson t o ld reporters he planned no protest because un der our system of government we do not object to peaceful assem bly and demonstrations In Washington however the U 3 bitterly accused the Soviet gov ernment of stage managing he affair and said the resulting situation was bound to increase international tension The crowd included some youths in army uniforms The Russians converged on the building in Avhat clearly was a well planned dem onstration in retaliation for dem onstrations by Hungarian refu gees last weekend at the Soviet U N offices in New York ABOUT 25 Soviet policemen icld the crowd back when it first surged across the sidewalk to ward the 10story embassy build ing The number of police was quickly increased to 150 Some demonstrators shouted for Ambassador Thompson tc make an appearance He was away at the time and was under stood to be having lunch at home American diplomats and their families looked out from upper story windows to observe the demonstration The crowd whis tled and shouted catcalls Then some demonstrators whipped oui pocket mirrors and flashed sun light into the eyes of the watch ing Americans THE RUSSIANS were emotion al but much less rowdy than the ones who demonstrated Monday at the West Germany Embassy and last week at the Danish Em bassy The German Embassy wa heavily damaged by a barrage o rocks sticks and ink bottles Stones smashed windows at the Danish Embassy All three demonstrations were in retaliation for protests staget at Soviet embassies against the recent executions of Hungarian exPremier Imre Nagy and three other leaders of the unsuccessful 1956 Hungarian revolt In each case the Soviet told of the demonstrations abroac just before the protests were staged here When newspapers told of the demonstrations at the Soviet UN offices in New York US Embassy personnel imrhedl ately began preparing for trouble The Americans evacuated the ground floors of their building Minister Richard Davis called on the Russians for extra police pro tection HOSES WERE LAID out in the downstairs halls for use in case of fire Windows were coverec with cardboard Eight US Marines normall on duty on the top floors were transferred to the ground floo corridors Furniture on the two lower floors was moved out Russian employes were given the day off A total of 150 Americans eluding the wives and children diplomats live in the embassy building mainly in apartments the middle floors Another embassy families are housed elsewhere in Moscow as are the g 12 American news correspondent in Moscow and their families in Longer Nominated for Fourth Term FARGO N D Jfi North Da kotas colorful veteran Sen Wil liam Langer won Republican nomination for a fourth term without party backing in a race with Lt Gov Clyde Duffy the GOP choice in Tuesday primary election With 830 precincts 2332 reported Langer had 24463 Duffy 15178 Tfie Weather Mason City Fair through Thurs day High Thursday 6368 Low Wednesday night 3843 Clear Wednesday night and cooler except extreme north west Fair and continued cool Thursday Low Wednesday night 3848 Temperatures will average 4 to 8 degrees be low normal Thursday through next Monday Normal highs 84 north to 86 south Normal lows 60 north to 63 south Slow warm ing trend beginning Friday Cooler again Sunday and Mon day Rainfall will average one half to threefourths of an inch in showers and local thunder storms mostly Sunday and Monday Minnesota Fair not so cool High Thursday 6272 GlobeGazette weather data up o 8 a m Wednesday Maximum 74 Minimum 44 At 8 a m 50 Precipitation 44 YEAR AGO Maximum 70 Minimum 43 3 Believed Killed When Ships Collide NEW YORK W A Swedish freighter rammed an oil tanker in postmidnight darkness on the East River Wednesday The re suiting explosion turned the rive into an infernoand sent flame leaping so high they set the Man hattan bridge afire The tanke Three persons were reported missing two from thetanker one from the freighter Thirty seven others weie hospitalized and U others escaped without se rious injury Many plunged into the water screaming for help and swam through flames to rescue boats The fire on Manhattan Bndg did no great damage Transi and vehicular traffic was haltei for a time The surface of the river wa covered by gasoline from th sunken tanker menace o further explosion or was sj great that the Coast Guard closei off the river to ships V Many of those rescued wer saved by a fireboatthat daringly maneuvered alongside the flam ing wreckage so that crewmen could leap aboard DROWNS IN PAIL NASHVILLE Tenn OR One yearold Albert Hurt tumbled from his bed into a mop bucke full of water and drowned Tues day Unrest at Missile Factory Local Faces Union Action DETROIT Mich Defiant nckets facing union action to take over control of their local jammed up traffic at the Chrys ler Corp missile plant for a third day Wednesday A line of cars eight miles long piled up as Workers pickets paraded before the plant which produces Army Jupiter and Redstone missiles A bottle was tossed into one car and some motorists entering the plant were poked by pickets reached through car windows l DEPUTIES formed a cordon to keep nonstrikers cars moving into the plant Pickets jeered the officers v Two pickets were held for in vestigation of disorderly conduct One was accused of sprinkling tacks at parking lot and another of abusing officers by jostling them In a move to quell the wildcat walkout UAW President Walter Reuther called officers ofthe striking Local 1245before the UAWs International Executive Board to show cause why an ad ministrator should placed over the local THE LOCAL represents 450 of the missile plants 8500 employ es Officers of the local said they were unable to keep the mem bers from walking off the joband picketing the plant Monday and Tuesday s p The governmentowned missile plant 16 miles north ofi Detroit isoperated by the ChryslerMis sile Division UAW members have been work ing without a contract ler General Motors and Ford since June l when the 1955 con tracts expired with negotiations deadlocked on tie nationaLlevel Committee Discusses Firing of Teacher DES MOINES ex ecutive council of the Governors Commission on Human Relations met here Tuesday in a closeddoor session to discuss the firing of a West Branch school teacher No decision was reached The calledto dis cuss the resignation under pres sureby Donald E Laughlin35 as a teacher in the West Branch school system He charged he was forced to quit because he was a conscientious objector and Failed to register for the peace time draft He was convicted of not registering in 1948 INSIDE RUSSIA TODAY Academy of Sciences the Second Most Influential Assemblage in Soviet Union EDITORS NOTE This is one in a series of articles based on r John Gunthers new book In side Russia Today By JOHN GUNTHER After the Presidium of the CPSU and the Council of Minis ters the Academy of Sciences is probably the most influential body in Russia It directs super vises and stimulates the work of some 250000 Soviet scientists The Academy of Sciences is a s small body asfar as its leader ship is con cerned with fewer than 200 full members and about three hundred c o r r c s p o nding c a n d i d ate in embers These are the elite among sci en lists and scholars in the of Soviet Union GUNTHER To become a full academician is the very top Members ars chos en by invitation and tenure is for life THE RANGE of activity is in deed astonishing The aim is to give a centralized systematized approach to all scientific and as sociated problems in the Soviet Union At the moment as an ex ample the academy has out in the field no fewer than 117 ex peditions They range from pros pecting teams looking for min eral resources in the Turkmenis tan desert to icefarers investigat ing what goes on underneath the Arctic ice cap The academy publishes about 28000 important scientific papers a year ONE SCIENTIFIC field in which the are particu larly strong is abstracting Their service in this regard is admitted to be incomparably the best in the world even by people who hate to admit it Years ago in the United States students of chem istry were obliged to learn Ger man in order to read scientific papers and kacp up with G   

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