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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - June 1, 1955, Mason City, Iowa                                Doily Ntwspaptr MASON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE TNI NIWSPAPII THAT MAKIS ALL NOITH IOWANS N 11 H 0 ft EDITION MASON CITY IOWA WIDMISDAY JUNI Unemployment Follows British 4 Fliers Reach Honolulu Kin to Arrive on Thursday HONOLULU WFour U S air men who fought in the Korea War flew to Hawaii Wednesda after more than two years behin prison bars in Communist China Only Tuesday the Chinese Com munists who had held them fo violating the air over Man churia ushered them through the Bamboo Curtain at Hong Kong Their fourengine plane touched down at Hickam Air Force Base after a flight at This wa little more than 35 hours afte they left Hong Kong Aw tiring Crowd Waiting for them were military officials the Red Cross and i small army of newspapermen photographers and radio add tele vision men For the fliers Thursday will be the big reception That is when families arrive from ithe mainland for a happy long await ed reunion Wednesday afternoon after physical checkup and a rest the four will tell of their experiences in Red Chinas prisons at a news conference The fliers emerged from the plane a few minutes after landing and waved to the crowd below They wore slacks and loose blue sports shirts Each was drapet with traditional flora greeting of Hawaii All fourwere in high spirits ranc smiled broadly f r The airmen released near Hong Kong after mote than two year in Communist iChiha ywere shot down in the Korean War They are Capt Harold Fischer 28 Swea City Iowa Lt Lyle Cam eron Lincoln Lt Col Ed win Heller 36 Wynnewood Pa and Lt Roland W Parks 24 Omaha Nine The Air Force was flyingy relatives to Hawaii but ithey were not scheduled to arrive until Thurs day The fliers hafled their freedom at Hong Kong with a shouted Its wonderfulj and climbed aboard Gen Douglas Mac Arthurs former personal plane the Bataan It was to arrive at Honolulu at CST Wednesday They switched to Western style more thantwo years of Chinese zest The Bataan is equipped with cooking facilities Thick steaks were aboard Parents Say Fischer to Hurry Home SWEA CITY tfl The Harold Fischers did some fidgeting around the farmhouse near here Wednesday with their two bags Al most packed and Mrs Fischer say Ing I dont think the captain will want to stay more than a few days in Honolulu Hell want to get back and dig his fingers into Iowa sou Little Harold the 6yearold son of the Iowa Jet ace pilot in the Ko rean War recently released with three other fliers is going to be left behind We cant take him with us Mrs Fischer said Hell stay with folks on the Mr and Mrs Fischer planned to leave here in time to pick up an Air Force C47 which will fly them from Fort Dodge in late afternoon to Omaha A Constellation wfll fly them to Hawaii and back again They tell us we might be in Honolulu for four or five Mrs Fischer said I dont think we can hold the captain down that long He wants to get FORCES SWELLED DBS MOINES UP A record J08 recent high school sworn into the Air Force here Tuesday Seventeen them came from the Davenport area News in Brief PRESSURE ON CHINA WASHINGTON congressional leaders Wednes day said after a meeting with President Eisenhower that the United States is pressing for the release of all Americans still held in Red China They made the statement as authoritative sources revealed and Red Chinese officials conferred on the problem in the last few days at the Hotel Beau Ravage in Geneva Switzerland PASSPORT FOR NATHAN WASHINGTON UVA federal judge accused the State Department Wednesday of trying to overrule him and he ordered a passport issued forthwith to Dr Otto Nathan a close friend of the late Albert Einstein District Judge Henry A Schweinhaut signed an order which he handed down orally last week directing the State Depart ment to issue the passport JUST CANT FOLLOW RULES BOULDER Cele University Colorado cowls faced ditciplinary action Wednesday because they ipont a nifht in a mountain cabinwith of Sigma Nu Fraternity men A versify official said it would have been all right if the overnight had been authorised but it POSTAL PAY HIKE WASHINGTON Post Office Committee leaders pre dicted the Senate would pass Wednesday acompromise 8 per cent pay raise for the nations half million postal workers The 8 per cent bill is a substitute for an per cent increase which Congress passed earlier but which President Eisenhower vetoed The Senate sustained the veto and the post office committee promptly began work on the new bill STRIKE AT CHICAGO Ford Gets Extension of Union Contract DETROIT CIO United Auto Workers Union Wednesday extended its contract with the Ford Motor Co from midnight Wednes day to next Monday morning to provide more time for further nego tiations Walter P Reuther UAW president and Ken Bannon director of theunions Ford department issued a joint statement saying that i Ford had made a new proposal to the union Tuesday but that nego tiators are still far apart on many important Issues in add tion to the question of the guar GOP Senators Think Ike Ready to Accept 2nd Term WASHINGTON Hepubli an senators Wednesday said Pres dent Eisenhowers attitude toward lis job makes it almost certain in their opinion that he will run again ext year Sen Bricker ROhio took note f the Presidents news conference tatement Tuesday that his oppor unity to work toward a peaceful world was a fascinating busi commented I for granted the Presi ent will be a candidate and be elected again next Sen Dirksen RD1 said he was delighted to hear the Presidents xplanation that he is fascinated with his job and the responsibili es that go with This is clearcut evidence of his utlook his physical wellbeing his ense of responsibility and the opportunity he sees to lead le world along the pathway of Dirksen said Russ Japan Open Talks for Treaty of Peace LONDON and Japan pened secret negotiations Wednes ay for a World War II peace reaty The conference also is in ended to iron out disputes over territory unreleased Japanese prisoners of war and other issues anteed annual Reuther said the fourday con tract extension was to give the union and company added time to explore the companys new proposal and to try to work out our differences on all unresolved The extension eliminated the possibility of a strike at midnight Wednesday In announcing ex tension Reuther said union nego tiators had advised the Ford com pany that the contract will not be extended beyond Monday June If agreement has not been reached between now and that date a strike will Reuthers statement added Meanwhile approximately workers at Fords Chicago assem bly plant quit work in apparent anticipation of a strike Wednes day night UAW leaders were ex pected to urge them back to work Because of the contract exten sion the Ford andGeneral Motors contracts thus will run at roughly the same time The GMUAW agreement expires June 7 but nek of a specific hour of termina tion could carry the two pacts down to the wire together JAMES DIES NEWBURY England UP lionell James the first reporter o use radio to cover a war died Tuesday He was 85 June to Be Busy for Ike Capped by U WASHINGTON will one of President Eisenhower busiest months in his White Hous career now that he has agreed tc speak at ceremonies marking th 10th anniversary of the United Na tions The chief executive will make lying trip to San Francisco Jun 20 for the U N ceremony Origi nally he had indicated that h could not go to San Francisco bu apparently had a change of heart in the last week or 10 days He explained Tuesday that th date originally suggested to him or San Francisco conflicted wit i previous engagement but tha the officials arranging the U N meeting switched their invitatioi o June 20 which he could accept Class Reunion The chief executives fast and armoving June schedule begin next Sunday afternoon when he will fly to West Point for gradua tion weekend and his 1915 das reunion at the U S Military Acad emy He will remain in West Poin until next Tuesday afternoon On Friday June 10 Eisenhowe will leave for Pennsylvania State Iniversity where his brother Dr Milton S Eisenhower is president The chief executive will visit with his brother and receive an honor ary degree at university com mencement exercises on June 11 He may return to Washington from Perm State via his farm at Gettys burg ThreeDay Test On June 15 Eisenhower along with members of his cabinet ant about other governmen workers will leave Washington and scatter to a number of secre relocation centers for an elaborate hreeday Civil Defense exercise involving at least token evacuation of the nations capital The President will be away from he White House during all of the threeday test operating from se cret headquarters established for the Civil Defense exercise The San Francisco trip by air and out and back in fast order will take at least all of June 2 and part of June 21 On June 22 Eisenhower opens a sixday tour of New England visiting speaking and fishing in few Hampshire Vermont and tfaine returning to Washington he afternoon of June 27 14 iralk AP Wirepboto THEY WAIT AND wait patiently in Londons Waterloo station but there were few trains to take them out of the city The strike of railroad workers brought only skeleton schedules for the vast number of commuters Conditions to Bring Big Delay to Desegregation ATLANTA Ga lo cal conditions into account seems 0 be the key phrase on which xth sides of the segregation issue are hanging their hopes The U S Supreme Court Tues day ruled that public school seg regation must end as toon al practicable But it opened a back door for opponents by turning the problem over to lower federal courts and by saying local condi tions should be taken into ac Georgia which jure counted a mun i the BtUens HoeghChecks Simplified Tax Form for State DBS MOINES tf A concise and simplified income tax form or lowans is being checked by Gov Leo Hoegh and State Rep ack Miller RSioux qity before inal adoption Chairman Martin Lauterbach of the State Tax Com mission said Wednesday The proposed form doesnt quit each the twopost card size which Miller had commented might be result of revisions in the in ome tax laws adopted by the re ent Iowa Legislature But it is very much simpli ied over forms presently in use Lauterbach said The post card size wouldri uite fit in the computation am ecording machines of the com missions office Lauterbach ex lained He said also that in the evised form a few questions nol ncluded in the post card sizec roposal were added They were to give us what we onsidered the minimum informa should he Lauterbach said that the gover or was asked to look over the ommissions new form and give his approval Weve worked losely with Rep Miller on this and understand that Gov Hoegh as asked Miller to take a look at ur proposed said the ommissioner AP Wlicphoto POOLSIDE romance which started in Chicago was climaxed Wednesday suits for Mary Blecha andJohn Paper at Miami Pla With the Atlantic Ocean as a backdrop notary public Ben shorts the ceremony on the pool diving board Heavy Rain Hail Falls in Area Crop Loss Likely Heavy rams and some hail were reported in the Algona Britt and Garner communities Wednesday At Algona the rain mixed with hail fell chiefly in the morning Some crop damage from hail was likely but no specific losses had been reported early Wednesday af ternoon Rain started to fall at Britt about 9 and most of it fell during the noon hour No early reports of any damage had come in At Garner 88 inch of rtin had fallen up till early afternoon and some hail was reported in the west part of the county It was be lieved there would be some crop damage in spots SIGN 0 THE TIMIS KANSAS CITY downtown clothing store hereis selling a new item for vacation Saunters strongest opponents of integration in public schools stood pat on their vow not to mix white and Negro students in classrooms Taking local conditions into ac count they said could result in many years of litigation An opposite view came from Mrs Ruby Hurley of Birmingham regional National Assn secretary of th for the Advance Appar ment of Colored People ehtly the court expects compli ance in all the states which have ACCUSED SLAYER Obie Hat ton 40 Paris said It had to be done might as well do it now after his father in law was shot to death Tues day Hatton jailed on a murder charge said he was threatened with an iron bedrail Senate Passes 8 Raise in Postal Wages WASHINGTON Wl The Senate Wednesday passed a bill to raise alaries of the postal work ers an average of 8 per cent after teing assured it was acceptable o President Eisenhower The roll call vote was unani mous 780 The Senate debated only half an iour and sent the bill to the House where the Post Office and Civil Service Committee plans to meet n it Thursday It is a substitute for a ay hike measure vetoed by the President May 19 That measure arried pay raises averaging xr cent and fringe benefits which ook the overall total up to T cent The bill passed Wednesday gives ach postal employe a 6 per cent aise retroactive to March 1 The dditional 2per cent involves re lassification features demanded y the President COSTLY ELECTION CHICAGO UP The two main andidatcs for the Chicago mayor Ity in April have estimated their ampaign expenses and the total vas more than laws governing segregation in pub lie she said It als expects the lower courts to se that compliance is carried out in good Sen Albert Boutwell chairman of the Alabamas Interim Legis tative Committee on Segregation in Public Schools said the Su preme Court order appears tc admit that local conditions mus be taken into consideration Virginia officials who favor a cautious approach to the problem commented that it was about all we could hope But two attor neys for the NAACP in Virginia said The court has afforded th South a reasonable period within which to make an effective transi tion to nonsegregated education but has made it clear that the process of desegregation mus start promptly forwarx with all deliberate Stanley Pleated Gov Thomas B Stanley of Vir ginia appeared pleased with the high courts pronouncement He called for an early meeting of the states segregation commission so it couldgivehim the benefit of itsjudgment in the light of the present A federal judgeIn Tennessee said the decision puts no presenl responsibility on that state because it has no segregation cases pend ing Judge Leslie R Darr com mented at Chattanooga that the Supreme Court would not and could not direct a local judge to carry out a decree that the local judge did not have an opportunity to de termine in the first Almost immediately after the directive was announced the Flor ida Legislature named a fiveman Senate committee to study the de cision The committee reported a short time later that the decision creates no current need for either a special session or an extension of the current session Local Powers Shortly before Tuesdays an nouncement Gov Leroy Collins of Florida signed a bill giving local school authorities power to assign students to schools Collins com mented that current state laws are adequate and wfll permit us full advantage of the authority to relate enforcement to sound local Francisco A Rodriguez counsel of the Florida conference of the NAACP said At first blush it may seem as if the courts pro nouncement leaves too much room for evasionand temporizing Fur ther study may show that this is not the No Sign of Break a rent Rail Workers Off Jobs LONDON UR Widespread un employment within 48 hours hreatened Britain Wednesday u the nationwide railroad strike went into its fourth day Armed with state of emer gency powers proclaimed Tues day night Prime Minister Edens newly reelected Conservative gov ernment hoped to marshal a great leet of trucks buses and private cars to move goods and workers or essential services But this promised little or no help to the nations huge industrial plant confronted by dwindling supplies of raw materials for lack of trains to replenish them and mounting piles of finished prod ucts that could not be hauled away Some plants already were sending workers home Expert Drive The nations vital export drive already hit by a stubborn 10day old dock strike faced a crippling slowdown whose effects might last or months The members of the strik ng Associated Society of Locomo tive Engineers and Firemen stood pat on their demand for a raise in their present base weekly pay of Fearful of setting spiral of wage and cost rises the man agers of the stateowned railways refused to go above 70 cents a week for crews oa main line trains and 35 cents others There also was no sign of a break in the strike of dock workers de manding bargaining recognition for the smaller of Britain 5 two unions of stevedores Nearly men were out in six ports Tuesday an increase of inore than since Saturday A total of 120 ships were idle An almost solid front of public and trade union hostility lined up against the striking railmen FewQualified The emergency per mit use of troops as train crews to break the strike but this ap peared unlikely because few sol diersare qualified as locomotive crewmen A governmentsspokes man stressed the Cabinet has no plans at present for using the Army except to help move ithe mails Some 750 soldiers in 250 Army trucks already are helping with postal deliveries Under the emergency the government also can requisition vehicles and can waive licenses re quired for the carrying freight and passengers It can also ration gas coal electricity and gasoline and set up a system of priorities or the hauling of goods and work ers Jy Because Parliament must apj prove the emergency regulations as soon as Eden moved up the convening of the tew House it CommonsJor business to June 9 five days earlier than scheduled West Union School Plan Is Decisively Defeated WEST UNION LBAlthough otal vote was favorable rejection f proposed consolidation of IS chool districts in north Fayetta ounty was decisive in an elec tion here Tuesday Only six of 16 districts approved the proposed reorganization Ap roval by 12 of the 16 districts would have been necessary to make it effectives The total tote was 788 in favor and 732 opposed with U ballots spoiled About The Weather Mann CHy Showers Cloudy MipMeata Bain Coot Gtebe GazetM tter data 19 to S Wed CLOUDY Maxima 74 Mminmm At YEAR AGO 75   

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