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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: January 14, 1954 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - January 14, 1954, Mason City, Iowa                                North Iowas Daily Newspaper EdJIed for the Home CITY GLOBEGAZETTE THE N E W S P A P E R T H A T MAKES ALL NORTH I O W A N S N E I G H B 0 R S HOME EDITION n Seven u Copy MASON CITY IOWA THURSDAY JANUARY 14 1954 This Paper ConsUtj or Two No 13 ial India to Return Prisoners to Captors Nearly Three Days Ahead of Schedule PANMtJNIOM tin T PANMUNJOM to Indian LI Gen K S Thimayya announced Thursday hat Indias custodinl troops will return unrcpatriatcd Korean war prisoners to their Al lied and Communist captors next Wednesday three days before their scheduled release as civilians Inletters to the Red and Allied commands Thimayya said acting alone would return the cap prisoners not as the only correct and lawful and peaceful course open Indian troops hold in Koreas dc militarized zone more than 22 000 North Koreans and Chinese who were captured by the Allies and who have refused o return to their Red ruled homelands and 22 Americans 1 Briton and 325 South Koreans who refused repatriation from Heel captivity An Indian spokesman said Thi mayyas move was the Indian Against Their Religion Transfusion Refused by Parents Infant Dies to Tax Cut on Dividends WASHINGTON W The House Ways and Means Committee Thursday approved sharpcuts in personal income taxes on income from dividends Experts said the revenue loss wouldfbe240 million dollars theffrst yearant one billion when the program takes full effect lV The proposed changes would ap ply to some four million persons who receive dends About income from one third of divl thesc ftision The parents had been summoned into Family Court Thursday on a petition to declarethem unfit parents and their infant a ward of the court The parents Thomas Grzyb 20 and his wife Barbara 18 Wcdries day refused to sign a waiver which would have permitted an immedi ate Family Court hearing on the question of legally forcing a trans fusion Both arc members of the Jehovahs Witnesses religious beet Dr Bundesen The case was brought to th courts attention by Dr Herman N Bundesen Board of Health presi dent after he was informed of lh cjiild condition by officialsaUSt Anthonys Hospital and the babyrs physician Dr Isador Lerner Dr Lerner said the couples son Thomas Jr had needed a trans fusion since birth Hesaid the baby had been in a state of shock since an operation for an abdoml nal obstruction Tuesday The bdby is getting weaker bj the minute Dr Lerner said Wed nesclaynight Ialmost got on my knees begging the parents to allow a blood transfusion If the baby dies that is God will the young mother had said as she and her husband refused to allow the transfusion I have no fear The blood wont make any difference I am not going to hand him over to the court until I have to The judge doesnt care whats in the Bible Sister Mary Michael of the hos pitals pcdiatric section said she had told the young couple their babys life depended on a blood transfusion She added But the father told me Our belief wont allow it Its better to have a dead baby without the blood than a living baby with the trans fusion Eating Blood The parents had contended the injections of blood into the veins is Lhe same as eating blood which they claim is forbidden by the Bible In a similar case a fewyears ago the Family Court forced the administration of a blood transfu Commands final say and did not need the approval of the five nation Neutral Nations Repatria tion Commission headed by Thi mayya Both the Swiss and Swedish dele gates to the commission objected to parts of the Indian generals letter but both agreed to returning Uie prisoners Poland and Czechoslovakia the commissions Iron Curtain members presumably stood firm on Red demands that the prisoner be held until a peace confcrcnci settles their fate The Communis Feiping Radio called this a man dalory provision of the armistice An Indian spokesman said Thi mayyas decision left undecided the fate of 9Q North Koreans and Chinese who requested the oppor Umity to go to neutral nations such as India or Switzerland instead o being repatriated The nations thej chose will be asked whether thej would be relieved of any taxes at all on their dividend income Thig was the second major step announced in a complete overhaul of tax laws launched by the com mittee Wednesday The first agree ment would provide 50 million dol lars in tax savings for about 700 000 single heads of households Democrats were reported to have raised some opposition to the pro gram of relief for dividend rccip icnts The proposed ncjv Jaw provides that individuals pay no income taxes on dividends up to an nually received in the taxable years ending from next July 31 to Aug 1 1955 For taxable years ending after Aug 1 1955 individuals would pay no income taxes on dividends re ceived up to Stuber Proposes Hawks Cyclones Meet in Football AMES Wi Abe Stuber retiring football coach at Iowa State Col lege has recommended some 15 changes to build up its football pro gram to Big Seven standards His recommendations included Maintenance of 73 football scholar ships a year scheduling annual games with the State University of Iowa to increase gate receipts ex panding and improving its system forr attracting good athletes and providing for daily practice from pm to pm throughthe season Stuber proposed tha annual ISC SUI game be a 10th game each season Hcpredicted it would mean in revenue to each school Homesick Youngster Bicycles to Dixie ATLANTA e a rold Warren Shuey Jr was homesick for Dixie and his grandmothers fried he pedaled his bicycle about 700 miles from Wash ington DC to Atlanta Warren said he left home on his bicycle Jan 6 and that his parents thought he was headed for school Instead he kept pedaling south ward i Ho graveled about 100 miles a dny and slept in tourist courts at baggage was limited to couple of extra shirts and his Bible to Discipline Godfrey for Buzzing Action NEW YORK The New York Authority brushingaside ArthurGodfreys contention that a strong cross wind caused his plane to nearly hit the Teterboro N J Airport control tower has accused the radioTV star of care ess and reckless flying Godfrey had said earlier and repeated Wednesday night on his television show that a 70degree cross wind of about miles per hour caught his twinengine craft just as he sion infant SPACE thinking of a Jrip to Mars heres just the thing to keepyou from mjftlng interplanetary connec tions The worldsfirst space timepiece shows the comparative passage of hours months and earth and on planets TANKER stes IN fuiiy i tanker the 205foot F VernonJ lies on the botfom of the Easl beihgin acollisiori with an unidentifiettcraft in the stream Sixrofthetankers seven crew members were injured none seriously 16 Killed in N Plane CrasK ROME smoking fouren jine Philippines A I i n e plane crashed and explodedin the popu ous outskirts of and all 16 persons aboard were killed The DCG hit a vacant lot not ar from a big apartment build ng It was coming in for a land ng on a flight from Beirut Leba non one leg in its regularly sched uled trip from Manila o London An eyewitness said the left en gines were smoking as it ap proached Ciampino Airport out side Rome It appeared to be head rig for the building then banked and plunged into the lot with a rcmendous roar Among the seven passengers aboard was the airlines European manager Royal R Jordan a na live of Bostonj Car Wreckers Get Wrong Automobile MINNEAPOLIS Minn he embarrassed owner of an auto mobile salvage company promised a now car Thursday to motorist Charles Lines Shortly Barter reporting his car tolen from a parking lot Lines no iced the remains of ft in a nearby iuto graveyard The owner said workmen as igned to dismantle five wrecked ars included Lines auto by mis ake look off from Teterboro a week ago From Miami Beach Godfrey said It was unintentional and if T scared the boys in the tower I am sorry Fred M Glass director oC aviation for the port authority which operates1the major airports m the New York metropolitan area including Tetebbro said he noted Godfreysexplanation but told the Civil Aeronautics Adminis tration It isr difficult for anyonefamil iar with the aerodynamics and the characteristics of the God freys to believe that wind of thativclocily reported could pos sibly cause such a maneuver if the pilot and copilot wished to keep the plane on course First reports had said Godfrey upset because he was not allowed to take on his favorite runway buzzed the control tower The port authority asked the CAA if facts substantiate it to dis cipline Godfrey to demonstrate vigorously and unmistakably that reckless flying will not be tolerat ed in this area Maximum disciplinary action would be revocation of Godfreys pilots license will accept the prisoners he said The spokesman said also there probably would be no head count of the POWs before they are re turned In one such recent count 135 captives took the opportunity to get repatriated to Communism The Allies warmly endorsed the head count but the Communists and South Korea bitterly assailed it At Tokyo a spokesman for the UN Command said the armistic agreement provides for NNRC cus tody of the POWs until midnigh Jan 22 but added our prepara Little Progress PANMUNJOM Allied and Communist liaison officers met Thursday in an effort to get the stalled preliminary Korean peace talks under way again but they agreed only to try again Friday US State Department official Kenneth Young said the meetings might continue for a week or so The Communists proposed that the talks to set up a peace con ference resume Saturday and flatly refused to discuss condi tions for reopening the discus sions The Reds also turned down a UN suggestion that the liaison meetings be secret Envoy Arthur H Dean broke off the preliminary talks Dec 12 when the Communists accused the United States of con niving with South Korea in the release of 27000 antiCommunist Korean War prisoners Dean said he wculd return to the conference table only after the Communists withdrew Hielr charge of perfidy On The Inside Mason City Wrestlers to Meet Fort Dodge 17 Airport Boards 10350 Passengers in 53 10 Report Heavy Schedule in Cerro Gordo District Court tions areat astage where w could receive these men at an time The proposal from the chair man of the NNRC will be given careful study Later American authorities said officially Thursday the United Na ions Command would accept re urn of unrepatriated Korean War prisoners Jan a proposed by Indian guards These officials indicated how ever they would have preferred hat Indian troops maintain cus ody of them until midnight Jan 2 That was the deadline for a aeace conference to discuss the prisoners fate as provided by the Corean armistice Informed officials said because of Humanitarian principles the United Vations could not refuse to accepl eturn of the prisoners at the time has proposed These officials who may not be quoted by name feaf any refusal to accept prisoners at that time might touch off demonstrations vithin the prisoner compounds At the same time they realize that return of captives ahead of chedule might cause North Ko ean and Red Chinese Communist eaders to charge that armistice terms are not being upheld rAI About The Weather Mason City Cloudy Thursday night and Friday with snow Friday low a Considerable cloudiness Thursday night some light snow Friday mostly cloudy snow like ly extreme north Minnesota Snow spreading over entire stale Friday GlobeGazette weather data up to 8 am Thursday Maximum 22 Minimum 0 9 At 8 am 18 Precipitation trace YEAR AGO Maximum 29 Minimum 39 SAME 72 WHITE FLAft MEANS NO TBAFflC DEATH IN FAST Si HOURS SPACE HELMET FOR FLIGHT INTO ETHERJimmy Bowden 4 smiles from behind a new space helmet de signed for children to wear on flights into anesthesia as he is put to sleep for a tonsillectomy in the Bethesda Md Navy Medical Center Li 3 G Morrow codeveloper of the transparent helmet administers the anesthetic Also Shot at Lawyers j Man Who Shot in Gburtrdom Judg 1 WAKREK Pa While stunned residents pfrthis west ern Pennsylvania community mourned the death of old JudgeftllisonD Wade police Thursday lodged a forma murder charge against the man who shot him dead in his courtroom Wednesday Wade had summoned Norman Hbon 26 of Connells ville before the bench on a nonsupport charge lodgedby Moons istranged wife A handful horrified wit nesses watched the irate construc tion worker stalk to the front of the iourt and methodically shootthe udge twice after hehad fallen be ide his bench A short time later Hoon attempted suicide he wanted to do was to ask Moon why he wasnt complying a court order to pay his es tranged wife a wee k ex plained Coroner Ed Lowrey As Moon came forward from vhere he had been sitting in the pectators section he pulled a re olver from his pocket Lowrey aid He took a shot at the dis rict attorney and missed Then shot at his wifes attorney and missed again He kept walking in a sort of a emicircle toward the judges aench v Then the judgestumbled back vards down the steps on the other ide of the bench and fell on the floor Moon stood over him and methodically shot him twice Postpone Action in Reuther Case DETROIT T h e prosecution admittedly stunned by a key wit ness refusal to return to the United States Thursday obtaine a 15day postponement in thepre trial elimination of one four persons eharged in the shootin of Walter Reuther Recorders Judge John P Seal len granted the postponement un til Jan 29 in the pretrial examina tion of Carl Renda at the reques of Prosecutor Gerald K OBrien OBrien said he would be unabl to present his case without the tes Umony of the witness Donald Ritchie now held in Windsor Ont pending international extradition proceedings Renda remains free under a 000 bond OVER MT Force over the open cone of Fujiyama1 in central Japan on a routine patrol mission of the JapanAirsDe fense Force The majestic mountain serves as an unmis takable navigational aid t i Would Hike Payments Also Help Wants More iri Benefit Class WASHINGTON Els enhower Thursday proposed bririg ig 10 million more Americans un er social security increasing ben fits all along the line and raising o the amount of income ubject to social security taxes In a special message to Congress the President said the average payment to retired workers s now a month with a mini mum of and a maximum of For social security to fulfill its urpose of helping to combat desti ution these benefits are too low Eisenhower said Maximum Minimum Both the maximum and minimum hould be increased he said but roposed no figures A formula on hat will be presented later by Sec etary of Welfare Hobby he told the legislators Boosting to the amount of Jicome subject to social security axes as Eisenhower proposed would mean an immediate a ear tax increase for workers earn ing that much or more Employers payrolls would also e increased that amount for each worker in the a year brack et or above First At present the first of inI come is taxes The rate this year to JtW per cent It had been 1V4 per cent on worker and employer The President set forth a six point program for Improvement of he social securitysystem 1 Expansion of insurance pro tection to S persons not presently cluding selfemployed fanners many more farm workers and do mestic workers doctors dentists awyers architects accountants nd other selfemployed profes ional people members of state nd localretirement systems and clergymen on a voluntary basis nd several smaller groups 2 Liberalization of the present retirement test to permit retired vorkers to earn more at regular parttime jobs without disqualifying themselves for social security Bene fits At present a man or woman over 65 and under 75 cannot draw social security payments if earnings are more than a month This operatestodiscourage them from takingpart time work Similarly a widow of an insured worker loses her payment if she takes a job and earns more than S75 a month t After age 75 there is no restric tion at present as t6 earnings 3 The in tho monthly benefits which Secretary Hobby is to detail later 4 Broadening of tho currant bast of the social security is levying on the first of in come 5 Computation of benefits on a fairer basis The President said the level of old age benefits now is related to an average of a past earnings and thatunder the present law terms of abnormally ow earnings or none at all are av eraged in with periodsof normal earnings thereby reducing the benefits received by the retired worker He recommended a new ormula for computation of benefits to provide what he called a fairer return Under this formula the four low est years of earnings would be elU minated when calculating the earned payments Protection of Jho benefit rafei disabled Eisenhower rec ommended that the benefits of a worker wrufhasasubstantial work ecordinemployment covered by insurance and who ecomes totally disabletlfor an exi endedtime be maintained at mount hewould have received ad 65 and retired on tie dateyhis disability began he had nformedby Secretary Hobby thst of pro the administration presented oCongress would be on a ewn ooehalf of OM er cent thVanrfual ect insurance taxes made no actual dollar and stlmateof the cost   

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