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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: December 1, 1953 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - December 1, 1953, Mason City, Iowa                                North Iowas Daily Newspaper Edited for the Hoirie LOBEGAZEtTE HOME EDITION THE W S P A P E R T H A T M ARE S ALL NO R T HI 0 W A N S N E I G H BO R S VOL LX Associated Press and United Press Full Lease Wires Seven Cents a Copy MASON CITY IOWA TUESDAY DECEMBER 1 1953 This Paper Consists of Two One No 45 Dull Into McCart on Alii Allies Set to Begin Drive to Return Reluctant Prisoners Deer Stayed Home Too DEER LAKE 27 years Mrs Mary Vacula had gone deer hunting on the opening day of Pennsylvanias season For 27 years she had never shot a deer Monday she stayed home while her husband Steve went out on opening day with five male friends While he was deep in the forest she spotted a fivepoint buck from her back porch Mrs Vacula got her deer Steve got none APWirephotb BROOKLYN BRIDGE section of the 80year old Brooklyn bridge over the Kentucky River Har ronsburg Ky collapsedunder the weight of a ton truck The driver Eugene Patterson 26 suffered a back injury Neither henor the truck loaded with margarine went into the water which is about20 feet deep to Construct Phorte Cable Under Atlantic Ocean NEW YORK UPMAmerican Tele phone Co Tuesday announced plans to construct the first telephone cable system across theAtlantic Ocean at a cost of 35 milliotudoUars It will be by far the longest underseas voice cable in the world and the first laid at depths found in midocean The Jonglines department of said developmental and re search work on sucha cable has been going on for 25 years The project will take three years to complete No Television The cable will not carry wide enough band of frequencies for tel evision An agreement has been signed for construction of the cable by the British Post Office which provides telephone service in Great Britain and the Canadian Overseas Telecommunication Corp The cable will be owned jointly by thesethree organizations The submarine telephone cable system will contain a group of tel ephone circuits between New York and London and another group be tween Montreal and London At the gatewaycities the circuits will connect with the telephone systems of the respective countries Until now1 transatlantic and transpacific telephone service has been by short wave The longest underwatertele phone cable todateis be tween Key West Fla and Havana Cuba using special longlife vacu um tube repeaters 2000 Miles Long The transatlantic portion of the new telephone system with its many vacuum tuberepeaters wil be 2000 nautical miles in length and will be laid in depths to three miles on the ocean floor between Scotland and Newfoundland It wil then connect with another sub marine cable extending 300 miles westward to Nova Scotia From there a 350mile overland micro wave radiorelay system willbe built to carry cir cuits to the United Statesborder Americans to Be Last Interviewed PANMUNJOM UP Allied w a r msoners who havent come home egin Considering their big choice or Communism Wed nesday Plans were completed Tuesday for UN interviewers to start talks with 30 of the 328 South Koreans who have not returned Afterthe South Koreans are fin 11 days of interviews Allied teams will face pos sibly the most important phase of their to win back 22 Americans and 1 Briton The United Nations Commands decision to interview the Ameri cans and Briton last was seen here as a psychological tactic underlin ing an Allied feeling that the men may decide to go home if inter viewed near Christmas At 6 P M Brig Gen A L Hamblenchief of the UN repatriation groupre quested permission from the com mission to start the talks Wednes day i with the first 30 South Ko reans appearing in the interview huts at 6 pm CST Tuesday The commission also agreed to order Indian guardsto deliver the prisoners to the huts arid later seg regate those who hear the talks and continue to reject repatriation The commissions unanimous ac tion in approving the Allied re quest was a pleasant surprise to the UNC which had feared it would be forced to interview all 351 prisoners in one day This apparently unfounded fear grew from the commissions re fusal of a Communist request to interview less than 500 antiRed Chinese and North Koreans in one day Subsequently the Communists broke off their explanation pro gram i How Many The big question is How many The Communists wooed back only about 3 per cent of the 250 Chinese and Koreans they have in humiliating propa ganda walloping We want all of the prisoners listed as proCommunist to get freedom of choice a UN Com mand spokesman said We want people all over the world to understand that the UN C is willing to give these prisoners a free if they choose the Communists An Allied officer said he believes the 30 RpKS would agree to come out for the first days talks The Allied effort will open with five South Korean interviewers one at each of the five explanatior sites requested The Communists used up to three each ex planation tent SAME OUACK MEANS TRAFFIC DEATH IN PAST HOURS Newspaper Strike Will Last at Least Day More NEW YORK union official indicated Tuesday New Yorks newspaper strike will continue at least another J24 hours v Denis M Burke president of striking Local 1 of the APL International Photo Engravers Union said a membership L the union to con KGLONorth Iowa Fair On Tlie Page Floyd Man Sentenced to Jait for US Corn 2 Maryland Leads Final AP Football Poll 17 North lowans Win National 4H Honors 17 Late November Rains Break 3Vi Month Drought 14 Unbalanced Budget Endangers Democracy El then Warns 3 Vegetable Growers Meet in Mason City Dec 1011 24 In Reply to Red Feeler e Spurn Armistice SAIGON Indochina W1 Viet Nam Chief of State Bao Dai turned a cold shoulder Tuesday to a pur ported offer by Communist Leader Ho Chi Minh to negotiate for an armistice in the sevenyear Indo china War A statement from Bab Dai also took a the French saying Hos armistice proposals seemed to be in repiy to feelers that werent formulated by Viet Nam The exEmperor said the only way to end the war is to inflict a decisive military defeat on Hos Communistled Victminh rebels The Stockholm Ex pressen published a cable Sunday in which the Victminh chief was quoted as saying hp would ready to meet an armistice pro posal from the French He demand ed an end to hostilities and that France really respect the indd pendence of Viet Nam The French cabinetrefused to comment pending a study of the statement but it infuriated many antiCommunist Nationalists in 11n dochina These leaders fear the French weary of the costly will negotiate a peace which wil leave the way open for the Com mimists to take over Indochina These Nationalists were unen thusiastic over Bao pais state ment They had hoped he would give France anultima turn that Vie Nam would break relations unles the French continued The former Emperor however appeared trying to avoid troubl with France by abstaining from a tone the French might think toe aggressive AP Wirephoto PLEDGE MILLION College at Med ford Mass announcedMohdaynight that Harry Posner industrialist and his wife have pledged to the part paymentof we owe this land of freedom and opportunity Posner caine to this country from Russia at the turn of the century Special Back The KGLONorth Iowa Fair Special train pulled into Mason Citys Milwaukee Station on sched ule Tuesday morning at It brought more than 230 tired but tiappy North lowans back to their homes in more than 80 cities and towns j Earlier the special sevencar rain made stops at Galmar and Charles City The party left Chi cagos Union Station at pm Monday evening after four days of sightseeing and the highlight of the trip a look at the 1953 International live Stock Exposition The train left Mason City Thurs day evening at 9 pm and arrived in Chicago early Friday morning A half dozen chartered buses then ook the party to the Congress Hor tel headquarters in the Windy The round of activities began al most immediately The CerroGor do County group went through the Federal Reserve Bank Friday morning where they were struck almost speechless by the sight of millions of dollars lying around ike baled hay A few fortunate individuals held more than three million dollars for a few seconds Although the North lowans were whisked about the city on a num ber of supervised trips they still iiad plenty of free time to shop and see the latest movies and stage productions As the train pulled into Mason City one 4H boy was heard to say It was sure four days in Chicago But its sure good to be home again sider publishers proposals ha been set for 11 a itf9 iBurke said no agreement be tween union negotiators and the aublishers can be effective until i ratified by the union member ship The strike of the 400 photo jen gravers has resultedin a shut down of the seven major news papers in New York for the firs time in tlhe citys publishing hi tory Other newspaper unions hav observed the engravers picke lines Representatives of the engraver union arid the publishers are sched uled to resume talks at noon Tiies day HIGH PRICED ARTICLE jar of peanut butter was priced at 21 cents but it cost Milton C Corlett 30 Keo kuk Monday He was con victed of petty larceny in the theft of the peanut butter from a gro cery store last Saturday negotiationswere recessec Monday night a federalmediato said there was no change in effort b settle the dispute over wage and other issues Union and pub lisher representatives hadrip com ment on the course of the talks Photo engravers on the six news papers walked out early Saturday 3ut the Herald Tribune no struck because it has its photo en gravingdone by a commercia plant The six dailies were Closet down because members of othe newspaper unions honored th picket lines of the 400 photo en gravers More than 20000 em ployes were idled The Herald which pub ished a streamlined eightpage ed ition Monday announced Monda night it was suspending until fur ther notice Baby Rescued by Father Riley on Journey to U S YOKOSUKA NAVAL BASE Ja pan blueeyed blond mys tery baby temporaril adopted by an aircraft carrie for the United State Tuesdayheaded for a new life a an American citizen Little George C As com monthsold sailed aboard a Nav transport due in Seattle about Dec 14 With him was the young Catho lie chaplain E O Riley of Dubuque Iowa who picked th blond baby out of a Korean orphan age and took him aboard the air craft carrierPoint Cruz last Sep tember Father Riley formerly was a Holy Family Parish in Mason City The baby will be met by his mother Mrs1 Hugh Keenan of Spo kane Wash Her husband a Nav doctor aboard a ship in Korea waters arranged for the adoption Little George is a real myster baby Hes Caucasian right t his toenails Father Riley sai Tuesday VThere isno doubt a all under the laws of heredity tha both his father and mother Caucasians U S Seeking More Talk on Big 4 Parley Will Do So at Bermuda Meeting WASHINGTON State John Foster Dulles said uesday the United States would ccept Russias plan for a Big Four oreign ministers meeting if a tudy shows that the proposal is good one Dulles also told a news con erence that Russias willingness o joinin such a meeting repre ents a diplomatic victory for the He said it is a victory in the ense that in the past Russia had mposed conditions that were unj cceptable Now he said the Soviet appears to be reversing tself Still Wants Study But Dulles emphasized that the United States still wants to study 11 the fine print of the Russian iroposal before accepting it Dulles also said he wants the of the West German govern ment He said he expects the ioviet proposal to be considered at the forthcoming Bermuda con erence of President Eisenhower 3rime Minister Churchill and French Premier Laniel He said it now remains to be een whether Russia is willing to permit a breath of freedom to ouch behind the Iron Curtain I not he said he sees little chance of success for a Big Four foreign ministers Dulles will accompany Mr isenhower to Bermuda Soviet Note If Mr Eisenhower and Dulles can get Allied agreement on th ground rules for a meeting with he Soviets they will agree to a ministers parley with th Russians But informants said th administration believes it is essen tialthat the Soviet proposals1 b reduced tp f some manageabl form for a meeting American officials studying th Soviet note feel that the Russian want to start fourpower meet ing with a discussion of world ten sions including talk on Red China then take up general questions o European security abou Germany if any time is left DWIGHT EISENHOWER WINSTON CHURCHILL JOSEPH LANIEL He Shouts Vishinsky Calls Lodge Liar in Afrocity Fight UNITED NATIONS N Y UP Russias Andrei Y Vishinsky Tuesday branded US charges of Red atrocities Korea a flagrantly concocted falsification The fiery Soviet delegate told the60nation UN General Assembly that charges detailed Monday by Henry Cabot Lodge Jr of the out to dyha vd peace negotiations in Korea He pulled out all stops in calling the Lodge report cyn ical cowardly a maneuver to cover the worst crimes of all per petrated by the American military circles in Korea and redolent of slander Vishinsky was the first speaker at Tuesdays session called to de bate the American charges that some 38000 persons were victims of atrocities committed by Com munist Chinese and North Korean soldiers Most delegates sat in shocked silence Monday as Chief US Dele gate Henry Cabot Lodge Jr de livered the stark atrocity report and introduced a resolution calling on the 60natibn Assembly 1 Express its grave concern at reports and information that North Korean and Chinese Communist forces have in a large number of instances employed inhuman prac tices against the heroic soldiers of forces under the United Nations Command in Korea and against the civilian population of Korea 2 Condemn the commission by any government or authorities of murder mutilation torture and other atrocity acts against cap tured military personnel or civilian population as a Violation of rules of international law and basic standards of conduct and morality and as affronting human rights and the dignity and worth of the human person In his speech Lodge raised the earlier US figure of nearly 30000 atrocity victims to some 38000 He later told newsirien it was his per sonal conviction that over 35000 of these are dead Avert Blast of pyrtamite IOWA ot a dynamiteJadentruck wasaverted here Tuesday morning by the quick thinking of the trucks driver arid fast action by the Iowa City fire department The right rear inside dual tireon the truck loaded with 30pOOpounds of dynamite caught fire alongside the State University ofIowa cam pus The driver Mile NpIan of Fre mont Neb tried tpfight the fire with a hand extinguisher and at the same time warned passersby and motorists to stay clear of the truck He told one of the motorists to call the fire The tire burning when the fire department arrived but it took only a shorttime to putit out About The Weather Mason City Rain becoming mixed with snow Iowa AVednesday rain probably becoming mixed with snow Minnesota Cloudy occasional rain central and south GlobeGazetto data tip to 8 a m Tuesday Maximum 33 Minimum 12 At 8 a m 22 Wont Toss Away Help of Friends By Blustering Tactics He Says WASHINGTON of State Dulles in an evident report to Sen McCarthy said Tuesday that President Eisenhow er and he do not propose to throve away the assets of Allied cooper ation by blustering and domineer ing methods Dulles did not mention McCar thy by name but he said he was commenting on widely publicized criticism to the effect that the United States speaks in too kindly a manner to its allies and has sent them perfumed notes instead of using threats and intimidation to compel them to do our bidding McCarthy used the words per fumed notes in criticizing admin istration foreign policy in his na tionwide radioTV address of Nov 25 News Conference In a news conference statement Dulles said the administration re jected methods and the use of demands which the Unit ed Stales would turn down if such demands were made upon it He said it is bases sharedwith allies which make possible the peacekeeping threat ofatomic re taliation by the United States against the vitalsof Russia The secretary said he spoke with the support of the President who was aware of the statement he made i Dulles had a conference with the President at the White House only an hour or so before his meeting with newsmen When talking of U S bases abroad Dulles saicUthat without theni andrallied warning systeiqs suoh centers as Detroit Cleveland Chicago and Milwaukee would be sitting ducks for atomic bombs in event of war V 4ft On anotherraspect speech Dulles announced that ca reer diplomat JohniPaton Daviea whose continued employment un der the Eisenhower administration wasattacked by McCarthy is un dergoing a new securityinvestiga tion which will be completed in about a month Old Davies is a longstanding target of attack by some for his connections with U SChina policy during World War 11 and more recently because he alleged ly recommended that the Central Intelligence Agency make use of certain Communists Dulles opened his news confer ence with his statement replying to McCarthy He said he welcomed constructive criticism but that the criticism he was referring to attacks the very heart of U S foreign policy It is the clear and firmpurpose of this administration Dulles said to treat other free nations as sovereign be large or small strong or weak1 Quotes Grandfather He quoted his grandfather John W Foster who was secretary p state in an earlier era as saying that U S policy na tions had been from the beginning a policy marked by a spirit of justice forbearance and magnani mity Dulles added I do not in tend myself to mar that American assistance tov other countries he went on i does not give the right to take them over to dictate their trade policies and to make them our satellites McCarthy had demanded that the United States deny pid to Al lied specified th eycut off trade with Communist China Dulles asserted that Americans Allies are dependable fj u s tbe cause they are unwilling to be any ones satellites They will freely sacrifice much in a common But they wuTno morebe to the United States than they will be subservient tbSoVieVRussia Let us be thankful tliat they ara that way and that there still sur vives so much nigged determina tion to be free If that were not so we would beisolated in the world and in mortal peril v WEIGHT TRUCK NABBED WAVERLY Neb UP State police Mondayvticketed the states test truck which chocks other trucks for overloading Tho truck carrying weights for scale7 WM overloaded v r   

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