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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - August 15, 1953, Mason City, Iowa                                North Iowas Daily Newspaper Edited for the MASON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH 1OWANS NEIGHBORS HOME EDITION VOL LIX Associated Press and United Press Full Lease Wires Seven Cents a Copy MASON CITY IOWA SATURDAY AUGUST 15 1953 Tills Paper Consists ol Two OM No 244 Reds List Two North lowans as Dead Baby Beeves Bring Top Prices U S Might OK Soviets for Parley UNITED NATIONS N Y UP United States indicated Sat urday it might agree to accept the Soviet Union as a United Nations representative at the forthcoming Far Eastern political conference Reliable sources said that al though the United States still was dead set against including India in the talks there were indications it might be willing to accept the Soviet Union provided the Russians were not given red carpet treat ment The U S previously had flatly opposed the inclusion of Russia and India among the countries that will represent the U N at the poli tical conference scheduled to start by Oct 27 in an effort to avert an open break with her Western Allies on the issue the United States met secretly for the third time Saturdav with the 16 nations that fought the war for the U N United Nations sources said the United States presented the 16 combatant countries with a slate of nominees for the political con ference The list included Aus tralia Canada Colombia France the Philippines Thailand Turkey South Korea the United Kingdom and the United States Britain the Commonwealth countries and some of the Western European powers want both Russia and India to attend the conclave GlabcGatete photo by Musscr HIGH SELLING Zook of Clear Lake got the top price of 3014 cents a pound to top the sale of Cerro Gordo County 4H baby beeves at the North Iowa Fail Saturday More than 200 animals were sold at well above the market price Formers Accept Stiff Wheat Control for High Supports Grandma Repulses Attack BALTIMORE Md construction companys crew was in full retreat Saturday after failing in a daring seaborne attempt to wrest its expensive equipment from a riflewielding grandmother The defiant 57yearold woman Mrs Wanda Sienkielewski threw a chicken wire fence around the equipment Tuesday because she was tired of the firm parking it on her lawn without permission Late Friday the Leo G Butler Co sent 10 burly raiders on to a barge in Bear Creekbehind her house in a bold bid to recapture the sewerdigging machinery Mrs Sienkielewski swung into action Moving to the waters edge she lowered her 22 caliber rifle and warned Ill let the first one that comes on my land have it Nine of the raiders got the point and retreated in disorder When one kept advancing Mrs Sienkielewski hauled off and shoved him back on to the barge The company hastily railed off the attack Mrs Sienkielewski is hopping mad because the construction work ers ignored her demands to get the equipment off her property and adding insult to injury referred to her as an old woman She has announced she will never surrender the machinery until the company meets her claims for damages and parking fees 400 Allies Freed South Koreans Stone Taunting Red POWs PANMUNJOM M The UN Command said Saturday South Korean civilians stoned taunting Communist war prisoners moving north for repatriation Friday injuring 314 Reds and nine American guards The outbreak of violence near Inchon brought no imme diate echoes at this dusty village where 400 more Allied were freed from Communist prison camps Sat urday Nine other prisoners liberated of them seriously ill or due at Travis Air Force Base near San Fran cisco Saturday after a flight across the Pacific The second troopship to leave for the United States with liber ated Americans was to sail from Inchon Harbor Sunday morning Aboard the transport Gen Hase are 437 American repatriates and other troops enroute home on regu lar rotation The trip is expected lo take about 10 days The UN Command said some 3600 Red prisoners flaunting ban ners and chanting Communist songs hurled boots and metai can teens at South Korean bystanders as they were being trucked to a rail station from Inchon Harbor The South Koreans responded with rocks The UN POW Com mand said 3H Reds were hurt Stream From Fire Hose Injures Youth Hansen 10 was in critical condition at an Algona hospital Saturday with a compound fracture of the skull following an accident late Friday when he was struck by a stream of water from a fire hose The department was giving a demonstration of a new fire truck when the hose slipped out of the hands of one of the men the water striking a group of youngsters about 20 feet away Lynn was knocked down In addi tion to his fractured skull his lip was almost cut off several teeth knocked out and he suffered shock Lynn is a son of Mr and Mrs Wade Hansen His condition was described as fair at the hospital Saturday Pressure on Republicans Is Eased WASHINGTONUP nation farmers have accepted rigid con trols on next years wheat crop in return for continued high govern ment price supports In doing so Ihey eased pressure on farmbel Republican members of Congress facing campaign for rceleclion in 1954 Incomplete but conclusive re turns showed growers gave a top heavy vote in Fridays referendum 333751 to 51487 for marketing quotas on the 1954 wheat crop The restrictions will cut production am sales about 20 per cent from thij years 10 per cent above normal crop Favorable Vote The returns showed a favorable vote of 867 per above the 66 per cent required and the big gest proportion ever piled up in z wheatquota referendum The mainissue in the nationwide balloting was next years wheat prices The difference in price re sulting from approval or rejection of quotas could have been close o a bushel or perhaps one bil lion dollars on the whole crop Farm law requires the govern ment to support crop prices at 90 cr cent of a Bushel in the case of farmers approve quotas in times of surpluses and at only 50 per cent of for f they reject controls This years support rate is Fair to Farmers Parity is a price legally declared o be fair to farmers in relation o what they must buy Inasmuch as market prices usu lly reflect support levels rejected luolas could have meant a sharp drop in farm income in major wheat producing states at a time vhen many farm area Republican congressmen were seeking reelcc ion next year In this connection the quota ap roval was expected to bring fur hcr recovery in wheat prices in pecuative markets Quotations had dipped sharply late last week and early this week on private fore casts of a quota defeat Rut prices advanced somewhat Friday as armers voted 200 Sold at North Iowa Fair Cerro Gordo Comity 4H clu members receivpcJ well above In market price for the approxiinalcl 200 baby beeves sold at the annua 4H livestock sale at the Nort Iowa Fair Saturday Jack Zook ot Clear Lake look th first calf into the ring and was o fcred 30V2 cents a pound by Rat Packing Company of Waterloo I top the sale The first seven an mals sold all of which were purpl ribbon winners brought an avci age of Bidding Good Bidding continued good with G calves being put through the rin before the price dipped below 2 cents a pound Several of the lat Fair Program SATURDAY o n c c r I by Nora Springs Band a t c r Frolics phi Dorothy Dorben Dancers and novelty acts SUNDAY Band by Rockfor Sanctioned Big Car Auto Races by Klemm Band Frolics plus Dorothy Dorben Dancers anc novelty acts selling calves brought as much 27A cents due partly to the ruling hat no exhibitor could appear ii hc ring twice before all had ap peared once Several blue ribbon calves sold after the white ribbon winners The Mason City market fo prime cattle Saturday was 21 tc 23 cents a pound with choice bring ing 19 to 21M cents The calf bring the most nionej was a 1265 pound animal exhibited jy Bill Dodge and bought by the Mason City Auction Company for 27 cents a pound It netted Dodge Bought by Deckers Bob Wooldridge of Mason Citj lad a blue ribbon calf that jought by Jacob E Decker ant Son for 2914 cents a pound Jeralc Lage Eugene Evans Larry Nelson and Roger Ames sold calves fo cents In spite of the good bidding the calves were well under the 1952 price when the top calf brought 40 cents and the first 20 averagec 34M cents pound The biggest crowd of the 195 air filled the grandstand and part of the bleachers for the stock car aces Saturday afternoon despite ain showers Ticket sales were cs imatecl at 3GOO Another large crowd was expected for the big car aces Sunday afternoon Time trials tart at 2 p m and the races at Official attendance figures for he first four days of the fair were reported at 66393 by M C Cap jawson secretarymanager of the air Last years comparable fig ire he said was 60940 Fridays was reported as 18167 as com pared wilh 16793 on the same day year ago Judging Completed Livestock judging was all com elefl and top billing was given to he grand champions in the Gucrn ey and Holstein shows either one if which was larger this year than iny breed show previously Marion Jones Iowa Fails showed he grand champion Guernsey bull nd H W Sawin and Sons North vopd the lop female In the Hol lein show George DeSotal Dows ad the grand champion bull and horvald Andersen Cedar Falls tie grand champion cow More than 2000 persons watched he second day of Tournament of hrills before the grandstand Fri ay afternoon when Joie Chit voods Daredevils again slammed nd crashed through 18 events on he dirt track Jimmy Williams ipton driving for Chitvvood again von the auto crash roll event dging out Dick Andrews Hali ax Nova Scotia DIES OF INJURIES DES MOINES Davis 6 Indianola died Friday night at Des Moines hospital of injuries uffercd in an auto accident LYLE H CARMAN DANIEL E CAHALAN Mason City Rockwell Men Named Say They Died in Red Prisons The mimes of two Norlh Town MS Cpl Lylc II Cnrnuin Mason City nnd Cpl Daniel 1C Cahalan Hock well were included in a list of 131 officers and enlisted men reported Friday by Ihu Communists to have died in prison camps in Korea Cpl Calinlan is the son of Mrs Dan Margaret Cahnlnn of Rock well and had previously ljccn re ported by the Defense Department as missing in action in Korea since Feb 12 11151 Cpl Carman is the son of Mr and Mrs Martin 11 Cannun 611 Carolina SE He was reporter missing in action July 12 1950 on a few days after the Korean War started Not Verified The word from he Secretary of the Army emphasized that the in formation was received from the Communists and hns not been veri fied by the US Army The two North lowans were among eight lowans on the latest of three such lists and brought to 16 the number of lowans tho Reds claimed died in their prison camps Tho Communists have listed a total of 1022 Americansas having lied in captivity and the Defense Department said that all of those identified will be considered us missing in action until all means of determining heir fnte have been exhn us led The other six iownns mimed on Lhe latest list of dead nre st James It Clark son of Mr and Mrs L A Snook RFD 1 Fnrrar 1fc Sam Nelson Jr son of Mr and Mrs Sam U Nelson Sr 1U 2 Ilumboldt Pfc Hubert C Schcrdin hus band of Mrs Marilyn Schordin Griswohl Cpl Merlin N Schuster son of Mr and Mrs Emil M Sinister Farley Cpl Everett W Spilxcr of Sioux Rapids son of Mrs Lula E Spit J2U7 Third Ave East Spencer dipt Roland V Suntl son of Mr and Mrs Waller V Sum Buffalo Three Sisters Besides his mother Cahaltm Is survived by a brother Francis Rockwell and three sisters Mrs Clyde CorbJU Cassopolis Mich Mrs Sherman Swnnscn Rockwell and Mrs S J Hickey Lcrov Minn Mrs J L Delnncy 524 6th S E is nn mint and George W Cnhalan Glh SE is his uncle After her son was reported mis sing in 1051 his mother rccoivut copies of the National Guard inn magazine in which her son waj among 12t listed as prisoners of the Communists in North Korea She had received no further won of him until the telegram Fridaj from the Secretary of the Army Cpl Cahnlnn served IO month in the Army during World War II of them overseas He look par n tho Normandy northern Rhinclami nnd central Europe campaigns and wore five battle tars when discharged in Novem jcr 1045 as a sergeant Recalled to Duty He was recalled to duly with the xscrves in July 1950 A graduate of Monroe Junior iligh School Carman 23 enlisted u tho Army in Mason City on May 8 1948 He was sent to Japan six months Inter serving with the 24lh Infantry Division Carmnn had finished his tourof overseas duty and was waiting for Ji ship to return to the United States when the Korean war broko out He accompanied tho 24th Di vision to Korea and was among the first US troops to challenge the North Koreans He was last seen on July 12 1950 near Sinvou justsouth of Seoul Living In Oklahoma Mr and Mrs Carman were liv ing in Oklahoma when they were notified their son was missing in action During tho three years ot war they received no letters from him or any information as to his whereabouts Besides his parents ho is sur vived by five brothers Delno serv ing with Ihe Army in Germany Jerry DCS Moines Gordon Charles Cily and Chester and Cor bctt Albuquerque New Mcx and two sisters Mrs Dallas Spurgcon Mason City and Mrs Ronald Me Kibben also of Albuquerque STRIKE SETTLED SIOUX CITY 111A monlhold strike of 18 AFL Teamsters union members against the Ready Mix Concrete Co ot Sioux Cily hecn settled jfcv OFF AND Roberts sails off towarctt rough landing after being catapulted from the hurricane deck of a Brahma steer at the Biinvell Rodeo in Bunvcll Neb Attendance has approached 12000 daily 2 North lowans Mentioned for National Demo Post DES North lowans were listed aa possible andidates for Iowa Democratic national committeeman Sat irday as party leaders assembled here Mentioned were Jake Douglas of Mason City and George aub of Cresco unsuccessful candidate for congressman 1rfrom the Third Congressional district in last years election Party leaders were also faced with the task of naming a nationa commilleewoman to replace Mrs Florence Lynch Le Mars who died last spring Ruth Mettler s Post DES MOINES resigna lon of Mrs Ruth Mettler of Ma on City from the Iowa Dcmocra ic central committee was an ounccd Saturday by Jake More tatc chairman Mrs Meltler who has served hrce years as third district com mittcewoman resigned because of ie press of personal business lore said He said Ihe state committee meeting here Saturday to elect olh a national committeeman and ommittccwoman would delay se ection of a successor to Mrs Meti er EXPLORER SAVED PIERTCE SAINT MARTIN ranee cave explorer Jose arcia fell more than 300 feel into ic earth Friday but was rescued fter four hours with only minor AJurics Others mentioned as possibilities for commiltccmon included Henry Janssen Eldora Don Mitchell Fort Dodge Otha Wear in Hastings Arthur Sanfonl Sioux City Walter Mahoncy Sioux City Scwell Allen Onawa Everett Brown Eoonc Frank Comfort DCS Moincs Carlton Bch DCS Moines G G Icck Atlantic Ne son G Kraschcl Harlnn George E OMalley Des Moincs and Bor is Alexander DCS Moincs SAME rUr Irairle in panC Zi Jiunrt Rhee Shouts for March to Unite Korea South Korean troops paraded LIuougK t us battered capital Saturday and President Syngman Rhee shouted his determination to march north at tho earliest possible time as this war shattered Republic marked its ruth independence day PI al acfhfs packed into Capitol Plaza Rhee re crated that the postarmistice political conference nas yt days to unity Korea And lie predicted again thu Ihe conference will fail Rhee made it clear that unifica tion is his go11 One Standard The one and only standard by which the success or failure of the political conference may be jucigc is whether it achieves this com mon objective he declared nhec said the armistice shiftcc Ihe Rattle of Korea from miii iary to a political field but it stil struggle tc remains the crucial avoid World War in He spoke at a giant gathering ii ront of the warscarred capito building AL least 100000 South Ko rcans lined Ihe streets and cnpito plaza to hear the speech directly and over loudspeakers Korean po ice estimates ranged as high as n halt million Parades Strength After the speech the Republic of Korea proudly paraded its miti ary strength Unils from 16 ROK divisionsmarched smartly through Ihe streets Cadets from the army and naval academics joined thu paratlc and a battalion of Koreai marines in full battle packs took a salute v The small ROK air force sonl 24 Mustangs over the parade Big guns tanks trucks jeeps ambulances and all the cqiiipmenl of modern war passed the review ng stand where Rhee stood stir rounded by foreign dignitaries in eluding U S Ambassador to Ko rca Ellis O Briggs and 8th Army Commander Taylor Gen Maxwell D All About The Weaiher Mason City Partly cloudy Satur day night and Sunday owi Partly cloudy through Sun day Minnetota Sunday partly cloudy scattered showers GlobeGazette weather data up to am Saturday Maximum vs Minimum 52 At 8 am et Britain Wont Help If Korea Breaks Truce LONDON Minister Winston Churchill warned Satur day tliil Britain would not support South Korean President Syngman Rhee with her fighting forces if ha breaks the truce AL the same time Churchill said Britain would Join 15 other Korean illics in resuming and extending the fighling should Ihe Communists wreck the armistice Churchills statement his firsft direct political move since doctors ordered him to rest last June was Issued amid a controversy over ho 36nalion declaration on sup port for Soulh Korea in event of Communist treachery The prime minister said Britain vould consider herself bound to lie agreement only if here was what we may term an unpro voked breach by the Commu nists Laborites were angry because he declaration was signed while Parliamcntwas in session but was not announced until after members had recessed until next October Some sections of the Labor Party Icmandcd a recall of Parliament or discussion of the Korean issue Conservative opinion however allied around Churchill Churchill said his statement on lorea had two objectives 1 To ease tht fears of mart erved Korean Allies and certain Jritish quarters that Britain will ermit herself to be dragged into war with Communist China over hecs actions 2 To hit back at Labor1 and riticism that Parliament had no pportunity to debate the declara on   

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