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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: August 4, 1953 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - August 4, 1953, Mason City, Iowa                                North Iowas Daily Newspaper Edited for the DN CITY GLOBEGAZ THI NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH I O W A N S N E I G H I O R HOME EDITION VOL LIX Associated Press and United Press Full Lease Wires Seven Cents a Copy MASON CITY IOWA TUESDAY AUGUST This Paper ConiliU of Two 70 to Be Released American Prisoners Only Few Hours From Wars Happy Ending PANMUNJOM hundred Allied war prisoners of them home to freedom in a few hours opening the happiest postscript to the Korean operation big switch The big trade of Allied war prisoners for Red begins at 9 am 6 pm Gross Asks Ike to Fire Sec Dulles WASHINGTON H Gross RIowa urged President Eisenhower Tuesday to fire Sec retary of State John Foster Dulles In a telegram to the President Gross said he was heartened by a White House statement which said repudiates the he announce ment of Secretary of State Dulles tbat American troops would be used as labor battalions in the re construction of Korea Prior to your statement I was stunned that it could become the policy of the United States to strip American homes farms industry and business in the drafting of American boys for what would amount to forced labor in Asia where there is a surplus of man power Gross said He said Dulles has clearly dem onstrated that he is more of a li ability than an asset He sug gested that Mr Eisenhower re call Mr Dulles immediately from Korea before he perhaps creates further havoc and upon his return demand his resignation Dulles said Saturday that US forces would be employed so far as feasible to restore bombed out schools bridges and hospitals in Korea He said this idea of using thetroops as missionaries rehabilitation had the enthu siastic support Mr Eisen hower The White House insisted there is no intention whatever of using American combat units as labor troopsin Korea These forces it said would be rested trained and kept in a high degree of combat readiness Ike Calls Aid US Insurance SEATTLE M President Eisen hower told the nations governors Tuesday the foreign aid program offers the cheapest way to American security The President speaking infor mally at a round table discussion at the 45th annual governors con ference here asserted that the money the United States is pour ing into efforts to strengthen its allies is not going out as part oi a giveaway program Were not voting a giveaway program he declared We arc moving in the cheapest w a y toward preventing the most ter rible thing that could happen to the United States of America Eisenhower pinpointed this re mark with a discussion of the situation in southeast Asia He said the 400 million dollars Con gress has voted toward helping fi nance the fight against Commu nism in Indochina represents se curity insurance for this country Tuesday The Reds are handing over 12 763 Americans 8 186 South Koreans 922 British and 342 from nine other Allied coun tries Four hundred will be freed daily 100 each Hour for four hours 37 Months Some spent almost all37 months of the Korean War in bleak prison camps in North Korea Theyll return to freedom at his neutral center where Allies and Reds finally wrote on armis tice July 27 The Allies are giving the Reds 74000 North Ko reans and 5OOQ Chinese at the rate of 2400 able bodied and 360 sick andwounded daily On the eve of the great ex change Red Cross representatives from both sides crossed the line at Panmunjom to begin inspection of prisoner camps and to comfort the homebound captives The Reds said the first group of 100 men to be freed would be sick and wounded 35 Americans 50 South Koreans 8 Turks 2 Fili pinos 1 Briton 1 Australian 1 Canadian 1 Belgian and 1 South African 50 Koreans An hour later theyll hand back 50 South Koreans 25 British 10 Filipinos 7 French 7 Colombians and 1 Greek The 11 am group will include 35 Americans 15 Turks and 50 sick and wounded South Koreans At noon 100 South Koreans will be released From Panmunjom the Ameri can prisoners will be sped by truck to Freedom Village near Munsan there theyll get medical care showers mail food press inter views for those who are willing and just about everything else the Army can think of Liberty Village British prisoners will go to near by Camp Britannica and South Ko reans will go to Liberty Village After quick processing at Free dom Village the Americans will be flown by helicopter to Inchon the port of Seoul on Koreas west coast Theyll be held briefly there a few days and then be picked up by troopships for the biggest ride Some of the sick and wounded Americans may be flown to Japan and on to the United States for treatment AH About The Weather Mason City Partly cloudy Tues day night and Wednesday Iowa Partly cloudy Tuesday night and Wednesday Minnesota Wednesday p a r 11 y cloudy and warmer Globe Gazette weather data up to 8am Tuesday Maximum 83 Minimum 66 At 8 am 66 Precipitation 98 YEAR AGO WASHINGTON UH Republican Senators Tuesday elected William F Knowland as theSenate major ity leader to succeed the late Rob ert A Taft Sen Homer F Ferguson of Michigan was elected to chairman ship of the Senate GOP Policy Committee to succeed Knowlnnd a Californian A turnout of 39 of the 40 Repub lican senators stamped approval on tho new leaders whose choice had been generally expected at a closed door conference Meantime at the stroke of mid night the Republican controlled 83rd Congress wrote finis to a mixed record ofaction and lelh nrgy in helping President Eisen hower fulfill his campaign pledges But the lawmakers left behind for their second session beginning a possible special meet ing this imposing list of key measures which will make or break their record This first the first Congress in two decades to be Re publicancontrolled while a Repub licanwns In the White made a firmstart toward edging away from the Democratic partys NowDealand Fair Denl phil osophies But even Republicans conceded ti wus only n start and much of it at that achicvqd only with Demo cratic Eisenhower will give the nation his own estimate of this sessions achievementsin a radio broadcast Thursday from pm to 8 pin to be cnrricd by all major AV Wirepliolo CLOSING UP books and papers acting Senate Majority Leader William Knowland left and Vice President Richard Nixon leave the upper chamber early Tuesday morning after the 83rd Congress completed its first session ii Nothing to Hide Man Gave Fees for Tax Fixing to Demos WASHINGTON UP Washington attorney Welburn Mayock disclosed Tuesday that the Democratic Party got of fee he collectedin 1948 forhelping a businessmanget ruling Mayock was Democratic National Committee counsel at the time He discussed thetransac tion with a reporter in advance of his appearance before a house sub committee investigating tax scan dais He said he saw nothing wrong in it because he believed the tax case was settled on its merits He conceded however that the busi nessman who retained him obvi ously thought he was buying something besides legal talent If thats a crime Im a cooked goose he said Mayock said he decided to tell he subcommittee the whole story Because Ive never run from any ihing yet and J see no reason why I shouldbe a liar or a perjurer The businessman was William S Lasdon Katoriah NY He testi fied Monday that after other law yers had failed to solve his tax xoublcs he agreed to pay Mayock ifa favorable ruling were granted It was and he did Mayock said Las don had a good case and h a v e gotten the favorable ruling without lis Kelp According to testimony Monday Treasury Secretary John R Sny der1 about the caseaniohg subordinates shortly favorable ruling was Taft Goes to Final Rest in Native Ohio CINCINNATI Juried her senior senator Robert A Taft Tuesday in a quiet simple cere mony that would have pleasedthe dignified statesman The son of a President who failed four times in his own bid for the nations highest office was laid to rest in the soil of his native Ohio in the first grave of a new cemetery insuburban Indian Hills onlya mile from his home Private funeral services were held at the Indian Hill Church with only the family and close friends attending But downtown hundreds jammed the large Christ Church as memorial services were conducted there simultaneously for the pub lic Bishop HenryWise IJobson of the Episcopal Diocese of Southern Ohio the senators pastor before the Indian Hill Church was founded six years ago read the Episcopal service Burial of the Dead the samd ceremony that was read at the1 privateservice In the small Indian HillChurch seating only a little more than 200 persons the RevLuther M Tucker read the s a m c simple ceremony The choir and congre gation sang Tafts favorite hymn Dear Lord and Father of Man kind The church jammed to capac ity in almost 90 degree heat was decorated only a few flowers 6000 Commies Attempt to Smash Food Stations Cops Hurl Reds Back in Battle BERLIN UP More than 6000 Communists including women in vaded West Berlin Tuesday and made three attacks on food sla lions hi an effort to break up the free distribution of American fooc to East Germanys hungry West Berlin police called out re inforcements and beat back the columns of riot gangs with clubs and water guns in swirling street battles Dozens of heads were cracked and about 150 Communists includ ing seven women were arrested Expect Attacks Police said they expected more attacks They reinforced their guards around the free distribu tion centers and moved mobile water guns up to strategic sectors The invasions took placein the Neukoelln and Kreuzberg boroughs of the American sector and the in dustrial borough of Wedding iu the French sector We gave them a good beating said a West Berlin policeman in Ihe American sector Police headquarters said about 50 Communists were arrested in the two clashes and that there were many broken heads The riot in the American sector was started by young Communists who infiltrated into a food station area in the guise of foodseekers While standing in line they began jeering police and the Americans When minor scuffling with police broke out the infiltrators were joined by a body of young Com munists who rushed across the sector border Pint Attempt The attacks were the first direct attempt to smash food stations in West Berlin But during the past week the Reds have manhandled hungry Germans who returned home with American aid packages The Communists also have imposed a blockade on train tickets to Ber lin in an effort to stop the floods of hungry from East Germany to the food centers Some 3000 Keel toughs stormed across the border into the French sector Police drove them back with clubs Another 3000 attacked in the American sector and battled West Berlin police in a street fight Po lice finally smashed the raid after calling up reinforcements Defy Threats Some 150000 East Berliners de fied Communist policethreats and sporadic confiscation of food par cels Monday and visited the free food stations Many more thou sands swarmed over the sector border Tuesday despite Commu nist disturbances WASHINGTON McCarthy RWis Tuesday accused Allen W Dulles director of the Central Intelligence Agency of covering up information about a top official of the supersecret organization McCarthy chairman of Semite investigations sub ommittee made public correspondence with Dulles brother CnmiXJ ff Hlli Dulles Arrives in Korea for Discussions With Rhee CLOSING IN RUNAWAY CRAFTFour boats powered by outboard attempting tocatch a runaway craft making circle in center in the MississipprRiver pear St Louis The driver of the boat was tossed out when it swung sharply after the motor started The unattendedcraft spun in a tight circle for about 20 minutes SEOUL Korea Sec retary of State John Foster Dulles arrived in Korea Tuesday night and said he5 believed his forthcom ing talks with PresidentSyngman Rhee will help assure achievement of an and lasting peace Dulles said in a written state ment that his delegation which in cluded Army Secretary Robert Stevens would attempt to develop a common policywith South Korea for the unification by peaceful meansof all Korea at the coming peace conference A 19gun salute greeted the Dulles plane as it landed here at pm more than 12 hours late Bad weather had forced it to turn back to Shemya Air Base in the Aleutians hope and believe that these talks conducted as they will be on the basis of mutual respect and mutual cooperation will help to assure that the respite from war now made possible by the armi tice will result in the achieve ment of an honorable and lasting peace Dulles said Cant Keep Count CADDO Okltu WVTho HerbIIeffermans ot San AntonioTex returning home from a vacation were stopped by the highway patrol Monday Count your children LI Ed Vandergriif Ot the patrol com manded They counted noses There wore only seven Susnhs missing the family chorused Now dont worry Vandergrltf said Shes on her way Minutes later the 8yearold unruffled by the experience of being left 20 miles behind at a rest stop in Atoka took her sent and tho trip wns resumed thanks to Trooper W H Bailey who spotted the youngster McCarthy Raps Allen Dulles for Covering U information of Secretary of StateJohn Foster Dulles abpiit getting information in the loyaltysecurity Ule of William P Buncly McCarthy in a Senate speech last month said Bundy had con Lributcd to the defense fund of Alger Hiss Bundy is a top CIA official and a soninlaw of former Secretary oC State Dean Acheson Hiss is a former State Depart ment employe now con victed of lying under oath when he denied passing secrets to a pre war Soviet spy ring Dulles advised McCarthy thnt a complete investigation of Bundy resulted in a favorable determin ation by the CfA loyalty board and the loyalty review board of the Civil Service Commission He added however thnt a re evaluntJon of Biindys case is be ing made in lino with President Eisenhowers new security pro gram and he fell he should not comment meanwhile on certain phases ictworksand atdr Monday night he sent letters ot warm thanks and appreciation1 o the House and Senate for ong hours they put in Six months ago Eisenhower laid lowu to Congress what he called a sure and substantial oward the kind of program ho hbuglvt best for the country Congress adopted some of hi j proposals and rejected Still others outlined in tHo5 Presf dents State of the Union message Feb 2 were never presented to Congress by tho administration Eisenhowers first big victory and his biggest defeat came in tha fiscal fieldtaxes V that bring in revenue andborrowing power that gives economic elbow room The victory was in overriding the vigorous objections of Rep Daniel Reed RNY and winning a sixmonth extension until Dec 31 of the excess profits tax on busi ness The setback was in losing an lUhhour pica to raise by 15 bil lion dollars the 275 billion dollar debt limit Eisenhower hnd said1 in his StaS of the Union message that taxes should not be reduced and thV statutory debt limit should raised The administration moved to ward his goal of a balanced budget but it still faced a deficit this year estimated at Eisenhower ran into light but won approval for 6W billion dol lars in foreign aid outlays Heres how iar Congress went in implementing other major for eign policy proposals in Eisen howers State the Union message 1 Prudent U spend 200 million dollars for re construction South Korea 7 Ex t n d d the Reciprocal Trade Agnomcnls Act one year until next June Approved 214000 aliens during7 next three Places Ban on Reports WASHINGTON WSen McCar thys Investigations Subcommit tee cnn file no reports withthe Senate during adjournment withoul approval of a majority otthe 13 member Government Operations Committee The bnn was Imposed on the sub committee JnsL Monday night when Sen Margaret Chase Smith B Maine blocked what appeared to be n routine resolution Tho resolution offered by Act ing Republican Loader Knowland of California asked the Senates permission that the subcommittee of which Sen McCarthy RWJs is chairman be allowed to submit reports of its investigations to the Senate and have them printed at government expense during ad journmcnl 4 ute of IPO million dollars of surplus governmentheld foods for famine relief abroad In the domestic field Eisenhower proposed in his mess age jiut which were not acted cm fully by1 Congress included Statehood for Hawaii revision of the TaftHiirtlcy law enact ment of a new form price support law broadening of social security coverage a general overhauling of the tax laws Army Private Is fleeted Sheriff Ky Army private was elected sheriff of Bal ard County In Saturdays primary but he wont wear his badge until he finishes bis military hitch in luding an assignment overseas Ernest Billy Bob Crlce Won the democratic nomination and he has no opposition in the November eral election The 27yearold soldier announced lis candidacy while on an eight lay leave earlier this year BEFORE ADJOURNMENT A Wayne Morse IndOre waves his arms as he talks to newsmen about his speech Monday night which delayed the ad journment of Congress Morse holds the Senate talkathon record with speech of 22 hours and 26 minutes   

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