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Mason City Globe Gazette: Monday, August 3, 1953 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - August 3, 1953, Mason City, Iowa                                North Iowas Doily Newspaper Edited for the m CITY GLOBEGAZETTE THl NEWSPAPER THAT M A K I S A N O R T H IOWANS N E 1 C H B 0 HOME EDITION VOL LIX Associated Press and United Press Full Lease Wirci Seven Cents a Cop MASON CITY IOWA MONDAY AUGUST 3 1953 This Fkper CoositU o Two OM One Mans Opinion A Radio Commentary By W EARL HALL Managing Editor The Editors Mail Bag TT would Im quite sure be the testimony of nine out of ten newspaper editors that just about the most stimulating part of the daily routine is opening the mail which comes to their desk Its loaded with surprises One never knows what to expect In my own case theres some thing close to an even division as between b o u quets and brick bats A lot of people take their pen in hand only on those occasions w hen theyre angry about something But there are just as many and I EARL HALL think perhaps a few more who are prompted by a spirit of kindness or appreciation Its mostly about the latter those who write in Ill be talking in this little visit with you But before I go into that I must say a word or two about those strange people among us who write anonymous letters At regular intervals for several years Ive been hearing from somebody who uses a postcard and a typewriter to bring me his cryp tic comments They couldnt be construed as complimentary under even the loosest interpretation The maybe its a just doesnt like Has a Thick Skin This particular or female young or gets some kind of satisfaction out of anonymous abuse Thats all right with me Long ago I de veloped a thick skin so far as barbs from anonymous writers are concerned Besides I have a com modious wastebasket Along with these anonymous writers who specialize on cutting remarks there are those who have solutions to practically all the worlds problems What seems passing strange however is that they always seem to have been so occupied with their deepsea think ing as to have had no time left to master such relatively simple things as spelling punctuation and grammar For as long as Ive had anything to do with shaping the news or edi torial policies of a newspaper Ive taken the position that anybody with a pointof view to express on debatable question should be willing to have his name identified with it There will never be space on my editorial page for the writer of an anonymous letter which is critical of anybody or anything Initials arent enough There must be a name Just a Minor Irritant But enough about anonymous letters and their writers lest leave the irrtpression that theyre a major problem for editors Ac tually they are no ntore trouble some to us than the occasional ant which finds its way into the house wifes sugar bin What I want to emphasize is the satisfaction I get fromthe kindly letters which come my way They reach me from people in all walks oflife from the humble and the exalted and all gradations be tween Within the last two months Ive had at least one letter from the occupant ol the White House and one from a mother ex pressing gratitude for some help had received from one of Aour agencies of mercy I wont attempt to saywhich thrilled me the more Perhaps I should explain that my mailthis year has contained more thanits usual number of letters from important people Theres an understandable reason for this My home town has been observing its 100th birthday and it was my as signment to contact those native sons and daughters who have gone out into the world and brought proud distinction to their home town in one way or another Honored Posthumously As a result my files contain heartwarming letters from such wonderful people Will son of radio and TV fame Hartzell Spcnce author of One Foot in Heaven and numerous other best icllers Bil Baird the puppeteer known to millions of TV viewers and quite a few others who have achieved on the large dimension on the stage in aviation in sports in business and in the professions There was one however whom we had to honor posthumously He was pur communitys foremost contribution vto the field of letters Indeed one ofthe Middle Wests most important authors of all time My reference is to Herbert Quick CONTINUED ON PAGE 2 Germans Riot Strike Over Ban Leaders Attend Services for Toff TAFT LIES IN STATE AT the greatrotunda of the nations Vapitof the body of Sen Robert A Taft of Ohio Senate majority leader laid in state with an armed services honor guard Lights in the long corridor make a bright burst above the casket Taft 63 died Friday in New York of cancer Reds Agree to of ROW Camps in North Korea Dean Not Among 1st to Be Freed PANMUNJOM Korea UP Maj Gen William F Dean Con gressional Medal of Honor hero of Taejon apparently will not be among the first group ofprisoners released by the Communists it was learned Monday Communist newsmen here said they did not know when Dean would be returned indicating that he probably was not among the first group of prisoners which has reached Kaesong for release Wednesday Dean commander of the 24th Division during the holding action battles in the early days of the war was captured in August 1950 more than three weeks after the battleof Taejon When Dean is returned he will go through the same repatriation channels as other American pris oners Dean is the highestranking United Nations officer held by the Reds It seems logical the Com munistswill make his return a Cull propaganda production per haps including a special ceremony here which will be dulyand fully recorded by their photographers Nothing has been heard from Dean for several weeks The last information indicated he was being held in a POW camp in Northern Korea Deans wife in Berkeley Calif has received no mail from him for some time MUNSANKorea United Nations Commandstaged an elab orate triarfun Mondayofthe ma chinery which will speed 3313 Americans arid other Allied oners of the Korean War home ward ina mass exchangestarting Wednesday One hundred fifty Allied soldiers played the role of liberated POWs in the dress rehearsal arid actually were from the exchange point at Panmunjom to the port of Inchon where the United States bourid troop ships awaited the ac tual exchange Mied and Communist Red Cross representatives meanwhile cleared the way for thefirst joint inspection of North andSouth Ko rean prisoner camps They signed an first opposed by the en able the 60man teams to begin their work at 9 am Tuesday 6 pm CST Red Cross teams of Americans Danes and British will pass legally north of the Communist Iron Curtain for the first time while teams of Chi nese and North Koreans cross to the south The agreement allows the Allied Red Cross teams to visit Red POW camps which stretch as far north as the Manchurian border to dis tribute gifts and observe the move ment of prisoners Swedish Maj Gezi Sven Graf Fdrmers Killed in Flash Flood CRESCO WlA flash flodd that washed out the approach to a countyroad bridge southwest of tierc resulted in death by drowning to two farm neighbors Mrs Francis Fitzgerald 24 and Anton Marik 36 drowned Sunday when the pickup truck in which they were riding plunged into a 14foot hole carved out by the flood waters Marik and Mrs Fitzgerald were returning to the Fitzgerald farm to check a report that lightning had started a fire there They and Mrs Fitzgeralds husband had gone to a nearby farm where a barn had burned down afterj being struck by lightning Fitzgerald was returning by car They hadbeen over the same road a short time earlier strom meanwhile announced the neutralnations supervisory com mission has picked next1 Saturday as the tentativedate for dispatch ing its inspection teams into North and South Korea The date wavs agreed upon at the third confer ence of the commission Monday afternoon at Panmunjbm The ChineseReds Peiping Ra dio said the first group of Commu nistheld POWs including sick arid wounded Was due Monday at Kae song seven miles1 north of Pan munjom and a second sgrqup was enroute Pyoktong prison camp onthe Manchurian border A Communist proposal to keep the 60man joint teams out of the prisoner camps themselves was flatly rejected by the U N Com mand Col L D Buttolph acting as senior U N merriber of the Mili tary Armistice Commission re minded the Communist Repatria tion Subcommittee of the com mission in a one hour and 36 min ute session that the armistice agreement calls forthe Red Cross teams to visit allPOW camps to comfort the prisoners and distri bute gifts The dispute was viewed as an other Red move to keep Western eyes from combing North Korea which refused during the war to admit international Red Cross teams High Praise Heaped Upon Dead Leader WASHINGTON Ei senhower and other lenders of the nation paid n solemn parting trib ute to Sen Robert A TaftMonday at a state funeral in the stone ro tunda of the National Capitol There were words of consolation from the scriptures and in prayers of Senate and House chaplains There was a glowing eulogy from Tafts Ohio colleague Sen John W Bricker In him were person ified the noblest attributes of the of God and love of liberty Dies of Cancer For these services the casket and catafalque holding the body oi the fallen died of can cer Friday in New were moved to the west side pf the ro tunda Sunday while thousands ol plain people paid their homage ij had rested in the exact center oi the vast chamber benalh the mas sive Capitol dome Temporary chairs for 900 were in place for the President and Mrs Eisenhower members of the Tafl family Cabinet members Su preme Court justices military chiefs diplomats and the 4iiembership of Senate and House The service began atil am with passages from the Bible and a prayer by the Senate chaplain Dr Frederick Brown Harris In this solemn hour he said inthis domed shrine of each pa triots devotion the chosen lead erg of our mourning nation gather about the mortal body ol the fal len leaderXwho with powers scorning personal delights for the sake of statescraft pourec forth devotion and unstinted serv ice for the America he Unstinting White haired Sen Bricker spoke in unstinting praise Real leader A true liberal Championed unpopular causes and espoused un orthodox views regardless of po litical consequences Deep con victions Unflinching courage Man of greatfaith in him self in his fellowman our kind of government k in Al mighty God During life Bricker said our departed leader created to him self an everlasting memorial His services to his government and through government to his fellow man will go ion and on Many hereafter because of his ennobling example will gain inspiration to serve in the case to which he gave his full devotion That will be our lasting memor ial in his honor The Marine band played the na tional anthem The House chap lain Dr Bernard Braskamp ift ed his hand and gave a benedic tion The Lord bless you and keep you That was all Tuesday the sena tor will be buried in Cincinnati Mother of 5 EMMETT DILLON SPENCER deceived husband was accused Monday of strangling his mother of five a bottlelittered hotel room where he surprised her in the companyof another man Emmett Dillon 49 a Sioux City Iowa tavernowner was charged with firstdegree murder after the predawn slaying Sunday of his halfrclad wifeWanda Norene 38 Authorities said Dillon said he struck his wife but didntthink I had killed her Mrs Dillon was severely beaten WANDA DILLON before her death police said Her companion for the night Cecil Stockburger 38 was also beaten seriously Dillon said he found his wife and Stockburger in a hotel She was wearing only a slip and Stock burger was dad in shorts police said i Stockburger testified at an in quest that Dillon knocked on their door twice and when Mrs Dillon opened itshe gasped Ohmy God CECIL STOCKBURGER Dillon knocked her across the room and began cursing Stock burger said He testified that Dil lon slugged him when he sat up in bed and Stockburger remem bered nothing after that Coroner L F Frink said Mrs Dillon strangled when someone grabbed her around the neck or struck her breaking several neck bones The couple Had registered as man and wife Dillon got by a room clerk a n d bellboy by promising he wouldnt cause any trouble HELICOPTER CRASHESA helicopter aNavy show forvisiting governors at Seattle Wash hits the water n short distance from the reviewing stand after the pilot lost control The pilot and a passenger were rescued Adjournment Near White House Delays Action on Debt Limit WASHINGTON Congress drove toward afternoon adjournment Monday after a White House conference de cided to postpone action on raising the federal debt limit until next year if possible r Acting Senate Knowlahcl RGalif and Sen Mlllikin chaiwnan of the Senate Finance Committeei told newsmen aftera breakfast meet ing with President Eisenhower that every effort would be made to avoid a special session this fall to act otv the debt celling Eisenhower had proposed an im mediate 15 billion dollar increase Status of Muter Legislation in Story on Pago 2 The House voted approval but the Senate Finance Committee killec the measure last Saturday Secretary of II u m phrey who with Budget Director Dodge sat in onthe White House meeting said later the adminis tration will operate under the prcs ent275 billion dollar debtlimit for the remainder of the year it is at all possible We will make every effort to comply with the demand of the Senate Finance Committee to post pone thonecessity for action by it aslong as we can and until the next regular session of Congress if possible Humphrey said in a prepared statement Knowland arid Mlllikin told news men they are hopeful a special session can be avoided Mr Eisenhower wants Congress to raise the legal limit on the na tional debt from to to permit the1 gov crnmcnt to borrow more money to pay its bills The debt now stands near and Hum phrey believes that continued red ink spendingjwill forco it through the ceiling beforethe next regular session of Congress convenes next January HouseApproves The House approved the higher debt limit last week but the Sen ate Finance Committee voted 11 to 4 Saturday night to shelve the bill Senate GOP leaders were then convinced that there was no hope of salvaging the bill On other items of must legis lation both the House and Senate Were in shape to clean up the un finished business by Monday night if they wished About The Weather Mason City Considerable cloudi ness and Humid through Tuesday Iowa Partly cloudy with scattered showers or thimdorshowers Minnesota Considerable cloudi ness occasional showers GlobeGazette weather data up o 8 am Monday Maximum 82 Minimum 67 At 8 am 60 Precipitation 180 YEAR AGO Maximum 87 Minimum 64 CARL Carl Hass Heads s W A T E R L 00 lown American Legion convention wn In full swing hero Monday follow Ing a Sunday Memorialscrviccanc he annual meeting ofthe 40 nm 8 Legion affiliate CarlHnss a World Wnr II vet eran from Clear Lake was nnmcd o head the Iowa voiturcof 40ant 8 as grand chef dc gnrc He sue cueds Albert C Stemlcr of Conn cil Bluffs who wns elected dele gale to the national conventiona chominot nntionnle Robert Ingersoll Clear Lake was elected district chemlnot Mason City Voititre 66 received hrec awards placing first in ac ivilics second in nursing scholar ships and third in membership Plymputh Has Three Breakins Three breakins and an attempt Ipsteal a cnr at Plymouth early Sunday are being investigated by the Cerro Gordo County sheriff office The dial was knocked off the safe at the Farmers CoOp Elevator and the combination punched in by he thieves who took about the sheriff said The rear doors were forcedat he Graverson Hardware storeand 5utton service station and garage but nothing wns reported missing A car owned byEd Cornelius vas backed out of his garage but ran over a lawn mowerin the ynrd and was abandoned there when the mower jammed under he wheels The sheriffs office was checking possible connection between the attempted car theft and the breakins Reds Halt March for Free Food Easterners Defy Red Tanks Guns UP Tons of thou sands of rebellious EastGorman iibofors were reported defying Soviet tanks and guns Monday to singe mild riots protest demon strations and strikes against Red efforts to bar them from obtaining free American food in WestBer lin Mass arrests by Communist po lice were said to have been or dered to enforce the bnn Movt Into Position Russian tanks guns were moved into positionin the larger Enst German cities under fbrdbrs to crush anyncw rev6lt by hungry Enst Germans Soviet troops were reported to have fired on East Germans in at least four cities Sunday to halt the hunger march to tho United States British and French sectors Berlin where Elsenhower food parcels1 were beingdistributcd Mondays distribution food whs limited to residents of East Berlin who i have more ready ac cess to the west sector of the city where tho food par cels arcavailable Western officials said about 120 000 East Berlincrs defied tho Red threats arrest r and confiscation of theirpackages to claim the food parcels Monday American officals said truck of Communist police Sun day dispersed 1000 workers marching op Berlin from the Lcunavcheinlcttl plant and the Buna artificial rubber factory in Merseburg Police attacked workers h6ar Halle and groups of thorn the officials said The northwest German radio said that workers in Magdeburg Jenn JBiUcrfeld Merscburg and other large industrial cities went out on strike Monday Fight Police Tens of thousands of East Ger mans buniccl government ings fought with Red police raid ed jails and called strikes in anger overCommunist trnvel bans to shut theni off from tho food un available at home but offered free in the West It was a smallscale revival of the uprising last June 17 which wns also put down with Soviet tanks and troops East Germans who ran the Red rail and road blockade said troops fired on the hunger marchers at Cpttbus Merseburg Chemnitz and Zittnu Sunday after they over powered Communist police The number of casualties was not known In nt dozen other cities East Germans wcro said to have held antiCommunist demonstra tions riotedfought with police and called strikes in outbursts against the1 Communist govern ment East Germans said secret police raided homes throughout the So viet Zone to arrest antiCommunist ringleadersIn East Berlin homes were searched for hidden Soviej Zone residents who defied the trnvel ban and came to Berlin refugees said Steal Food Police confiscated tens of thouv sands of the food parcels during the weekend and arrested hun dreds of persons who tried to run roadblocks erected on highways W Berlintherefugees said Mobs stormed sta ion at Cottbus savagely beat po Ice and Communist officials ried to haltthem andwere sub dued only when Soviet troops arid tanks rumbled into the Soviet troops also were said to lave opened fire in Merseburg Chemnitz and Zittau against bands of antiCommunists The itrators stormed jails to free po itical prisoners raided police star ions and looted and set fire to government buildings and state run food stores QUITS POST AMES Edna Woodward las resigned as manager of the Iowa Safety Council toenterpri vate law practice J D Arm strong Ames Council chairJrian iaid SAME DATIlfMBi   

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