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Mason City Globe Gazette: Thursday, July 30, 1953 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - July 30, 1953, Mason City, Iowa                                North Iowas Daily Newspaper Edited for the Home MASON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS HOME EDITION VOL LIX Associated Press and United Press Full Leaso Wires Seven Cents a Copy MASON CITY IOWA THURSDAY JULY 30 1953 Ttilu Vapor Consists of Two No 251 Requests Debt Ceiling Increa British Rap Americas China Stand HELD ON RED four men were among six taken into custody in Philadelphia early Thursday by FBI agents in a series of raids after they were charged with conspiringto overthrow the government FBI Dragnet Arrests Six Communists Who Advocated US Downfall PHILADELPHIA shabbily dressed tightlipped men were scooped up in an FBI dragnet early Thursday on charges they conspired to overthrow the United States government by force and violence FBI agents swooped down on the homes of four and the summer cottage of another The sixth was nabbed as he emerged from a Communist cell meeting u Hours later the six by then sleepyeyed men were held in a total of bail and led away to jail cells manacled two by two Bail was set at dawn in the Fed eral Building office of US Com missioner Henry P Carr Joseph Kuzma by Ihe FBI as a Communist party Irade union secrelary in eastern Pennsylvania and seized Ihe FBI agents said as he walked away from a Communist party meeting in northern Philadel phia He was held in bail for a further hearing Aug C after US Commissioner Joseph Hilden berger lold Carr he considers Kuz BULLETIN NEW YORK New York Hospital said Thursday Sen Robert A Taft suddenly had taken a turn for the The Ohio Republican was said to be breathing with marked difficulty Only a few hours earlier he had been sitting up in bed re portedly acting alert and talka tive GenMacNider Is improving Gen Hanford MacNidercontin ued to make satisfactory progress Thursday and was even able to sign business papers from his hospital bed during the afternoon accord ing lo his son Tom MacNider The altending physician stated that although it is a little early to give a definite answer he antici pated no difficulty from paralysis as a result of the generals stroke Tuesday night Gen MacNider experienced some muscle tightening during the hours immediately after the slroke his son explained but even this disappeared during Wednesday 7 More Die BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Iowas 1953 motor vehicle death toll is still rising swiftly II slood at 310 Thursday morning follow ing reports of seven more falali ties This was 31 ahead of the same date last year 76 compared with a previous time July toll of 59 in 1950 all ma the leader of this group Held for a further hearing on the same date in bail each were David Dubensky also known as David Davis vilz 29 Waller Sherman Labo Lowenfels 56 Thomas Nebried 51 and Benjamin Weiss 39 all of Philadelphia Kuzma was described by Ihe FBI as associated with the Commu nist party since the middle 1330s Labovitz as onetime Commu nist party organizer Lowenfels as Communist party candidate for Pennsylvania representalive in 1940 and former manager editor of the Pennsylvania edition of the Work Nabricd a Negro as organ izer of Ihe Communist parly in Easlern Pennsylvania and Dela ware Weiss as treasurer the Communist party in eastern Penn sylvania and Delaware for a num ber of years and DubenskyDavJs as one time member of the Na tional Cornmitlceof the Commu nisl party Minister Shouts He Has Never Been a Red WASHINGTON Of The Rev Jack Richard McMichael told the House unAmerican Activities Commitlee Thursday he is not now and never has been a member of the Communist Parly McMichael a 36yearold Melh odist minister from Upper Lake Calif made the sfatemenl under oat at a gavelbanging hearing into charges that he had been a Communist He previously had de nied it to newsmen He accused the committee of circulating false charges against him describing himself as a litllc town preacher Sometimes McM i c h a e 1 oul his qucslioners and some limes he losl oul in the hubub which Chairman Velde RI11 tried to quell wilh a pounding gave In one of the noisy arguments Counsel Robert L Kunzig charged the minister was trying to avoid the truth I sold peanuts as a litlle boy and I can shout as loud as you can McMichael retorted The committee session got off with a bang when Kunzig over McMichacls fervent protest read an affidavit by two Ohio residents identified as FBI agents x The deposition identified Mc Michael as a speaker in various ac tivities described as Communist dominaled or Communist fronts Al Wircphoto Left to right they are Benjamin Weiss 39 Walter Lowen fels 56 Thomas Nabried 51 and David Dubensky 46 all of Philadelphia Wants Reds in UN at Right Time LONDON The United States stand against sealing lied China n Ihe United Nations came uiulci rcsh fire Thursday in London and New Delhi Secretary of Stale Dulles was accused in the British House o Commons of laying down a polic ine for the Korean peace confer ence without taking into account he views of US Allies Clemen Attlee leader of the British Laboi Party said it was peculiar that a unilateral declaration of policy should come from Washington Atllee spoke after the Churchil government served notice it be licves Communist China shouk displace Nationalist China in the UN when the time is right The acting foreign secretary Lore Salisbury snid in the house o Lords it would be improper and impossible for him to say now three days after the armistice ii Korea that the time had arrived Wants Representation The acting prime minister Rich ird A Butler said Britain believe Soviet Russia as well as Commu nist China should be representec it peace talks on Korea But he old Commons the problem Chi nese representation in the Unitec Nations could only be decided bj he UN itself and added Our conception of the UN is hat of a family of nations and not an antiCommunist alliance1 Butler said Britain feels nations represented at the peace talks should include The United States ourselves France Soviet Russia the North and South Koreans th Peoples Republic of China Aus tralia India Turkey and perhap others He stressed that consideration Red Chinas membership depend on Pciping giving evidence of AP Wlicpholo OTHER TWO are the other two men picked up by FBI agents At right is Joseph Kuzma identified by the FBI as the leader of the group At left is Sherman Labovitz 29 U S Reveals Big Gains in HBomb Production WASHINGTON The United States announced Thursday it is approaching first major production of ma terials for hydrogen bombs and saidthat in the first half of 1953 development of atomic weapons has substantially Juvenile Court Hearing for Earl Kester Earl Kesler 16 Minneapolis will have a Juvenile Court hearing Aug 12 in connection with his holdup of a salesman near Rock well July 15 it was revealed Thurs day by the county attorneysof fice The decision to handle the case in Juvenile Court was made by District Judge M H Kepler Wed nesday following a conference with Hughes J Bryant assistant county attorney He said the boy had no previous bad record The complaint charges Kester wilh delinquency and resorting to criminalacts namely armed rob bery No criminal charge is filed in Juvenile Court and commitment if any is to the State Training School for Boys at Eldora After robbing the salesman Kes ter drove the stolen car lo Park Rapids Minn where he had lived before moving lo Minneapolis wilh hisparenls The boy spent three days with friends there before he accidentally ran the stolen car inlo a ditch and decided to give himself up He is being held in the womens ward of the county jail It said more fissionable ma terial Ihe sluff which produces Ihe explosive power of Abombs was produced than in any previous halfyear The government announced also that it is working toward develop mcnt of a superspced atomicpow ered submarine even before lesls have been run on two Asubs now nearing completion and rated po tenlially faster lhan ordinary un derseas craft The Atomic Energy Commission which runs the nations atomic program said in its scmiannua report to Congress that last springs weapons tests in Nevada disclosed such valuable informa lion that it will not be necessary to hold fullscale tcsls there this fall as originally planned These tests the commission said indicaled several very profitable avenues lo new and improvec weapons which would afford Ihc opportunity of substanlially grcalcr atomic weapons capability for the United Slates SAME Ollick Mix raffle death In poit i hours ingness to abide by principles o the UN charter Whatever opportunities ther may be for settling problems cai only bo taken if we maintain ai absolute united front with ou American friends with our Allic in NATO wilh the West German Republic and with all the coun tries of the free world and if w base ourselves on the spirit and concept of the charter of th UN he added Eager for Business British business men are eager to extend their trading with China and it has been British policy foi months that a Korean armistice would pave the way for consider ation of Red Chinas scaling in the UN Dulles has said the United Stales would feel free to use its veto i the question of seating Red China comes up Most UN legal experts however lake the stand that the question of what regime shall rep resent a country is a procedural matter and not subject to the big powcr veto Prime Minister Nehru of India long insistent that Mao TzeTungs China should have theseat urgec Thursday that these Chinese be called into conference wilh the major UN powers that fought in the Korean War He suggested this meeting be held ahead of the Aug 17 UN Assembly meeting which is to take up procedure for the Ko rean peace conference Attlee Raps Dulles In London Thursday former Prime Minister Attlee referred lo Dulles statement that the United States reserved the right to qui Lhe peace conference if the Reds were stalling and said It does seem extraordinary tha a declaration should be made lha Korean unity must be achievec and failing that the US reprc sentative would walk out of the conference That really does seem to me quite contrary lo Ihe whol spirit of the UN There is a general underlying suggestion lhat if everything doe not go exactly as Mr Dulles wanlf it then the US may go on ils own think lhat is a very dangerous suggestion LOW BIDDER OMAHA Army Engi nccrs said Wednesday the apparen ow bid of for repairs o Floyd River levees from Wren Junction lo Merrill Iowa was sub milled by Ihe Wilbur Nielsen Co Blcncoc Iowa rrr tnruir rrT v OlobOCillZoUo pllolO MllSBPt HIS iOTH Don Johnson a farmer southeast1 of Mason City gave his 40th pint of blood Thursday This one went to the Red Cross Blooilmobieto help make the quota needed for US soldiers returned from Communist prison camps in North Korea Standing by is Mrs Edward Boyle Clear Lake a volunteer nurse Red Warplanes Moving South MUNSAN radar tracked largo numbers of Communist warplanes southward from Manchuria to North Korean bases after the ceasefire deadline Monday night it was reported Thursday as the Heds complained oil two more minor truce US Air Force officers said V i becond Day Blood Gifts Over Quota Ihe Red MIG spoiled by n big Allied racinr slaticp on Cljo behind Communist North Korea delayed for 24 hours by censors An officer said Ihe Communist planes began laking oft at dark apparently from Manchuria n bases safe from Allied attack and were still landing at North Korean fields aflcr the 10 pm deadline when all arms and armaments shipments into Korea were to have slopped Allied planes hnvo bombed North Korean air bases continually but nn Air Force officer said appar ently we didnt leave Ihe fields nonoperalional Meanwhile the joint Military Ar mistice Commission picked Satur day as the tentative dale for Ihe irst faceloface meeting of Swed ish Swiss Polish and Czech offi cers who will police the flow of men and arms inlo and out of Ko Rcd Cross workers froin six na ions convened at Panmunjom to chart Ihe role Ihcy will pluy in helping repatriate nearly 00000 prisoners of war starting Wednes day Slaff officers oner exchange mel in Panmunjom o put finishing touches on plans or tho huge operation as Ihe first group of Communist prisoners andcd at Inchon en route tocamps where they will await exchange Maj Gen Blackshear M Bryan head of Ihe fiveman UN Icam on he joint Military Armistice Com mission said Thursdays meeting went very smoothly TINLEY SCHOOL COUNCIL BLUFFS W Ancw school which will be ready for use ibis fall will be named in honor of Council Bluffs citizensoldicr pbysician Dr Mathcw A Tinicy About The Weather Mason City Partly cloudy Thurs day night and Friday cloudy warm and Iowa Parlly humid Minnesota Considerable ness local showers GlobeGazelle weather data up o 8 am Thursday cioudi Maxirmtm Minimum At 8 am Prccipitalion YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum 78 62 65 08 79 55 The faithful donors who sign up and show up each lime th Red Cross Bloodmobile comes I town were given credit Thursday for pushing the total well over th quota for the second day of th visit The amount of blood drawn Wet nesday was 20G pints instead o the 201 scheduled previously Bu 51 persons who had appolnlrncnl just failed to show up and did no call to cancel Together with hos rejected Ihc loss would hav dropped Ihe total far below quota except for 35 walkins who en me without appointments Thursday there were only 25 per sons w h o missed their appoint ments during Ihe first five hours of Ihc sixhour day and 20 walk ins practically made up Ihis loss Thursdays lolal topped the 20 mark before 2 pm Don Johnson a big burly young farmer on a quarter scclion of lane miles southeast of Mason City typical of the faithful sau he Red Cross attendants He gave iiis 40th pint ofblood Thursday ant has never missed an appointmen with the Bloodmobile Johnson sees no hardship in do nating blood Theres nothing t it and theyre welcome to my blooi as long as they can use it he dc clarcd It gives one a good foiling tc know hes helping somebody Johnson firsl began donalint blood in 1938 when his fnlhcr wa ill and needed it During Work War II he was stalioncd in Tcxa wilh the Coast Guard and gave i pint regularly every six weeks he said When the Bloodmobile come around again all lhats necessary is lo let him know when he i wanted Hell be there If there faithfuls lendanls would draw 11 pinls every 15 minulcs during each sixhou day That would be 264 pinls each day for the American boys beini relumed from Communist prison camps in Korea were enough sue Ihc Bloodmobile al TV STATION WASHINGTON Fed erat Communicalions Commission Thursday granted permils for a new television station to the Hawk eye Television Company Channe 20 Cedar Rapids la Billion Is Expected to Be Asked Expect Delay in Adjournment WASHINGTON Wi President Elsenhower Thursday asked an in raise In Ihc 275bllltondollar fed debt limit aml congressional eaders agreed lo make an effort 0 put it through Secretary the T r e as u r y lumphrcy lold a news conference 10 expects the administration will isle Congress to raise the debt limit by 15 billion dollars to 290 billions There was every chief y because of hot opposition In the It would mean at least 1 weeks delay in the adjournment t Congress tcnlativcly set for tills vcckcnd Stilt House Speaker Martin RMnss aid however that he still had mpo Congress could get away Sat irday night Elsenhower put his request to he leaders informally at a White louse meeting which reached no inal decision as to whether them would be an nllempt to put the egislalion through But after a scries Capitol con ferences Chairman Reed RNY of the House Ways and Means Committee announced 1 Ho expected n message from Elsenhower during the afternoon ormally asking for the increase 2 His commitlce would proceed jromptly to consider it late Thursday Thursday night or Fri day Reed made his announcement after a conference of committee Republicans in Martins off ice Elsenhower invited Repub lican and Democratic leaders to the While House for breakfast and with Humphrey Dircc tor Joseph M wontpycr the governments fiscal lisltuatioh wilh them Ho nskcd no commitment front them and they left with Ihe un derstanding Uicy would consult among themselves and with other legislators of HuddUc Back at the Capilol there was a quick series of huddles House leaders indicated willingness to take up the it would mean no more than a weeks delay in adjournment of Congress Rep Cooper DTenn said there wns an understanding the Ways and Means Committee would begin hearings on a bill Monday The nlliludc of Seriate leaders was less clear Several influential senators are strongly opposed to Ifling tlic debt ceilings and the Senates rules permit unlimited de bate Sen Knowland Calif acting Re publican leader hinted Congress nay not meet Its Saturday ad lournmcnt deadline because of recent developments Knowland said he would consult with both the House Ways and Means and the Senate Finance commillees Thursday afternoon and with House and Senate ma jority leaders Calls Session Chairman Milllkin RColo of the Senate FinanceCommillee an nounced after a closed meeting of he group he would call a session Thursday aflcrnoon or Friday ba the debt ceiling Strong opposition to any increase n the national debt already has sounded on the Senate floor Sen Edwin C Johnson DColo said fewer than 5 of the 15 mem jers of the Finance Committee would vote for it and Sen Byrd DVa in a fighting speech an nounced he would batUc it Sen Butler asked if the ceiling would be boosted replied with a flat no As of now I think we can get along wilhoul it and I think we will he said Meantime Iho Senate early Thursday volcd in foreign aid funds toclimax a 25V4 hour oratorypacked session in which all efforts to slash the total wcrcrcjcctcd But the bill faced a new fight wilh the House Senate representatives mus work out a compromise settleme with those of the House whj pruned more than a billion dc rom President Eisenhower quest for funds to help vorld combat Communism A SenateHouse cdnfererr millee wQl be named seek a compromise   

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