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Mason City Globe Gazette: Tuesday, July 14, 1953 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - July 14, 1953, Mason City, Iowa                                North Iowas Daily Newspaper Edited ior ths Home MASON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE THI NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NIlGHIORS HOME VOL LIX Associated Press and United Press Full Lease Wires Seven CenU a Copy MASON CITY IOWA TUESDAY JULY H 1953 Tilli Consuls of Two NIPPED AT SECONDBilly Goodman of the American League is shown tagged out at second base on an attempted steal in the first inning of the All Star amex CrosleyField in Cincinnati National League Shortstop Pee Wee Reese of the took the throw from Catcher Roy Campanella to put the tag on the sliding Goodman Captain Ted Williams just returned to this country from a tour of duty as a combat pilot in threw out the first ball to onen the game National League Takes 57 Victory in AllStar Contest SCORE BY INNINGS 1234 56 7 8 9 Natl 0 E 01 H 0 H Q 3 Western Ministers Set Stage for Russian Talks WASHINGTON UP Three foreign ministers set wheels in motion Tuesday for possible showdown talks with Moscow on two of the biggest issues in the cold and Austria They agreed tentatively to call lor a fourpower conference of for eign ministers this fall to put Rus sias selfstyled peace campaign to the acid test Word of the understanding on Big Four talks came as Secretary of State John Foster Dulles Acting British Foreign Secretary Lord Salisbury and French Foreign Minister Georges Bidgult put the finishing touches on their fiveday strategy conference with a final session Tuesday afternoon They planned a final communi que summing up their effort to work out ways to exploit the un rest behind the Iron Curtain and to deal with Allied troublesin Eu rope the Middle Eastand the Far East The three statesmen sent a re port on their agreements Monday night to Londonand Paris If the governments approve the BigThree were reported ready to propose that Moscow join in four power talks designed to clear the way for an end to the Austrian oc cupation and free allGerman elections leading toward unifica tion of Sovietcontrolled Eastern Germany and Western Germany This would provide a major test of the Soviets peace offensive West German Chancellor Konrad Aden auer was understood to have been asked to approve ihe move to be outlined in an early note ad dressed tothe Kremlin Most Wanted Man Arraigned OMAHA Neb ar tist Robert Current FBIs 10 most wanted fugitives was to be arraigned here Monday before U S Commissioner M O Cunningham Current 28 and his attractive 19 year old wife Johanna were cap tured here without a struggle Sun day night as they were crossing an intersection in a residential area near the business district The slim darkhaired fugitive on the most wanted list since May 18 1953 is wanted by Minnesota and California authorities and on two federal warrants Losers Get Lone Score in Ninth CINCINNATI The tional League won the annua major league allstar game here Tuesday afternoon by seating the American Leaguers 51 The victory waj the fourthstraight in the all star game for the senior cir cuit to match the longest win ntng streak compiled by the American League in 194649 The vVin for the National cut he edge in allstar competi ion to 128 in favor of the American League Holding the losers to one run were four top pitchers from th National League Robin Roberts o he PhilliesWarren Spahn of th Graves Curt Simmons of the Phi lies and Murry Dickson of the Pi rates The National League broke scoreless deadlock in the last o the fifth inning by getting a pai of runs off Allie Reynolds of th Yankees Ed Mathews was hi vith a pitched ball Enos Slaugh er drew a walk Richie Ashburn matted for Spahn and slapped single through the box to scon me run and PeeweeReese fol owed with another single to score Slaughter Fred Gordon t in ua ing GASOLINE BURNSA gasoline transport truckwhich washauling 5900 gallons of gasoline burns in avditch on Highway 30 south of Marshalltown after a collision with acar Truck driver William J Best of Boone four personsin the carwere unhurt Par took a beating among earlj qualifiers fin the tl ow a Amateui tournament Tuesday Aat the Mason pity Country Club By3 oclock in the afternoon there were 18 contestants who had equalled or broken par Fred Gordon of Belmond a for mer state champion was atthe head of the pack with a 5under pair 67 Close behind were Herb Klontz of Cedar Rapids Don Knee ter of DCS Moines and Lest Handl of Independence with 68s In the 70 bracket were John Ey mamvof Forest City the 1953 city tournament champion in Mason City and Bob Leahy of Deriisbn There were eight who chipped par with 71s including Les Johnstone of Masori City and Rod Bliss of Des Moines the latter the 1951 tate champ and the runnerup last year Four others came in with ven par 72 rounds Supreme Soviet Told to Convene LONDON Moscow Radio an nounced Tuesday that the Supreme Soviet of the ILSSR had been summoned tomeet July 28 The Supreme Soviet is the Parliament It had its last meeting on March 15 to confirm the appointment of Gebrgi Malenkov as Premier Reds Continue Vicious Drive But Ike Sees Quick Armistice Red Fears Prevent Truce Agreement PANMUNJOM tf Allied and Communist armistice delegates met for 39 minutes Tuesday and then called it quits untilWednes day their negotiations apparently snarled by Red fears that South Korea wiJ honor a truce only for a limited time Official secrecy shrouded devel opments inside the conference hut but the Communist Peiping radio said the USSouth Korean accord has placed another time bombin the way to an armistice in Ko rea After Tuesdays session the UN Command reported that Commu nist liaison officers lodged a charge thatan Allied shell landed in the Panmunjom neutral zone Sunday The Reds charged Monnegotiations were getting no day that Allied planes bombed n where Their comments usually war prisoner assembly area north reflect the official Communist of Pyongyang July 10 The UN command has not yet replied to Mondays protest Although there was no announce ment concerning the fulldress truce talks Communist correspon dents outside the hut said the Group Senate OKs Excess Profits Tax No Changes in House Measure WASHINGTON W The Senate Finance Committee Tuesday ap proved President Eisenhowers proposal to extend the excess prof its tax for six months It made no changes in the bill from the form in which the House passed it Chairman Millikin RColo said the measure was approved in com mittee by a comfortable vote He predicted that the bill would be passed by the Senate possibly later this week without amend ment To Ikes Desk This would send the bill directly to the Presidents desk without he necessity of any conference with the House and would give Eisenhower oneof his biggest vic ories of the congressional session The administration has asked or the extension because spokcs ncn have said the treasury needs the revenue it would bring Just before the committee acted Eisenhower was reported to have old legislative leaders he woul willing to acceptan amendmen which would excuse some smal businesses from the levy The finance committee acted 01 he bill after a twoandonehaU hour closed session Eisenhowers reported willing ness to accept an amendment wa said to have been based on th condition that he would approv such action only if sponsors of th measure believed they would no be opening thegates to a flood o other amendments Only In the form approved by Ih House the measure would exemp only of excess profits a defined by the law from the big evies Sen Sparkman DAIa ha said he will give the Senate a ihance to vote on raising this ex imption to Leaders said the President indi ated he would be willing to ac cept an increase in the exemption o and might not objec o the figure Chairman Millikin RColo ha een pushing for Senate Finance Committee approval of the bil vitljouVanjarnWidment committee went tf rtito closet session tor consider the bill line inside the conference Alan Wlnnlnglon of the London Daily Worker indicated the Reds were asking a series of questions aimed at getting more clarifica tion on assurances South Korea will abide by an armistice It seemed clear that the Com munists thus farwero far from satisfied with President Syngmnn Rhcos statements on his two wccklong secret talks with special US envoy Walter S Robertson in Seoul Bomb AP Wlrophoto Ferrer KISS ME ROSEMARY KISS ME KATE vrho skipped to Durant Okla to marry singer Rosematy Clooneyreturned to Dallas and played his leading role Monday night in the Me Kate Just a ftwri Peiping radio quoting a New China News Agency dispatch from Kaesong Red truce headquarters said The RobertsonRhce talks in stead of providing definite guaran tee for the implementation of the armistice agreement has placed another time bomb in the way to an armistice in Korea Meantime Robertson left Tues day by plane for the Slates to report directly to President Eisenhower on his 16 days of sec ret talks with Rhee on a Korean armistice The assistant secretary ot stulo is flying by way of Alaska Ho re portedly took with him a signed pledge by Rhcc agreeing to abide by an armistice in Korea if one can be arranged at Panmunjom RoberJion Affable Robertson was affable but just before boarding his plane ho read this to newsmen noted In tho pressmany misrepresentations of the friendly and frank exchange of views in including SAME DATE BUck flar mean ii raffia death In past 24 hours YOU CAN SAVE A LIFE WHIN YOU GIVE BLOOD Even after the fighting slopsyour blood will be urgently needed Il takes time and blood to make a wounded service man whole and well again Blood is needed for hospitalized ci vilians national emergencies amti disastersami to help fight Polio Yes there are many ways in which your blood can gave a life Many reasons why this pricelesfl painless gift will be needed again and again Call Your Forces or Community Blood Donor Contor Published ax a public service in co operation with The Advertising Council T7 i minute larfpFecurtsun lime the actor and his bride obliged photographers with a real life kiss Top Russian Engineer Is Fired in Major Shakeup MOSCOW MP Vyacheslav A Malyshev one of the Soviet Unions top engineers andplanners has been relieved of his post as minister of transport andheavy industry in another major government1 The announcement that Malyshev Tias been replaced by Ivan Isidorovich Nosenko was made in the newspaper Eve Rhcc However unintentionally such misrepresentations may have been made they were none the less real Nothing agreed iipon is incon sistent with an immediate imple mentation of the truce and the longannounced objectives of tho United Nations the United Stales andthe Republic of Korea for an independent unified Korea and a just and lasting peace in the Far ning Moscow Malyshev a former deputy pre mier was considered by Western authorities to be one of tho mos important men in the Soviet Unio because he has held key posts i the development of ihe Soviet in dustrial war potential What hap pened to him was not revealed i the dispatch Last April the Kremlin sen Malyshev to Czechoslovakia to pu the finger on mismanagement o that satellites lagging foundry an steel industry but he was believe to have returned to the Soviet Un ion Malyshev became a vlceichair of jthqr Councilnof J tieSoviet 4947anrTin October 1952 was elected a ful member of the Communist party Presidium When the new streamlined Pres idium was announced after Stalin death in March Malyshev did no appear on that body but was given he important post of minister o xansport juilding and heavy machinery Nosenko Malyshevs successor also has had continuous experience n the field He succeeded Maly hcv as minister of transport en tinecring when the latter stepped up in 1947 Plan Big Test of Polio Drug SAN FHANCISCO plan o inoculate 1200000 children in a lationwide test of a new polio vac ine probably will be started this all the presidentof the National of Infantile Paralysis aid here If the vaccine comes out the y we want the polio problem viU be solved Basil OConnor aid OConnor told a news conference donday he hopes the new vaccine ow at the Uni ersity of Pittsburgh will be ready nthe fall for the biggest public est in history Surf Operators Ask Dismissal of Civil Suit FORT DODGE W Opera tors of a Clear Lake dance hall have asked that a civil suit involving allegations of racial discrimination be dismissed in Federal Court here Judge Henry N Graven Tuesday had under advisement a motion for dismissal by attorneys for Chicago operators Mrs John Amos of Mason City asks in her suit for inconvenience humiliation cha grin embarrassment and mental anguish and exemplary damages She contends that after buying a ticket to the ballroom on Dec 8 1951 she was denied admission solely becauseof being aNegro1 Mrs Amos further contends the defendants refusal to admit her vas a violation of the Iowa code The defendant claims the Fed eral Court lacks jurisdiction in the case because the primary amount n controversy is less than Federal court cases must involve more than that sum Defenses in Peril at Front Biggest Attack in Two Years SEOUL Korean officers ordered thoir men to stand or die in an effort to stem a vicious attack by some 80000 Chinese Reds who have ripped through Allied lines as far as four miles in a mounting onslaught that imperiled UN defenses Despite the Communist drive however President Eisenhower in Washington reportedly told con gressional leaders he believes truce is near Tho leaders meeting in their regular weekly White House ses sion with tho President briefed on the situation in Korea including the successful negotia tions for an agreement with South Korean President Syngman Rhee Eisenhower was described by some of those who attended as optimistic about the chances for a truce with the Theseinformants asked not to quoted by name Straighten Bulge The President and military lead ers were reported to regard the newest Communist offensive retced at areas held by South Ko rean troops as designed prlmari East No More Commtnt Ido not wish to make further comment before reporting in per son to President Elsenhower and Secretary of State Dulles Robertson did not specifically mentionwhat he called press misrepresentations However he was known to feel that his mission to Korea was damaged in particu lar by a news story from Seoul last Saturday which quoted Rhee as saying South Korea would abide by an armistice for only 90 days Robertson was said to feel that the particular news account gave a false assessment of the accom plishments of his mission i Oregon All Quief at Prison ifsALEM Ore Prisontorn four days by strike riot and was again quiet Tuesday The last o the 1000 rebelling convicts cowed by discomfort meager food and little water were returned to their cells Monday night All About ADOUt The Weather Mason City Fair to partly cloudy through Wednesday owa Wednesday mostly fair ex cept afew scattered showers Minnesota Fair to partly cloudy through Wednesday GlobeGazette weather data up to 8 a m Tuesday Maxirnum 79 Minimum 63 At 8 a m 67 Precipitation 04 NLRB Wathlngten attorney Monday was appointed chairman of National Labor Board at successor to Paul M who resigned recently lyvlp straighten put a bulge mado in their Jincs by a 1951 Allied Gen Maxwell D Taylor 8th Army commander said after firsthand look at the grave silua turn that ROK defenders yielding some ground as the de fense readjusts itself to the new situation Between 60000 and 70000 Chi nese aimed their sudden assault tho mightiest Red offensive in more than two line positions on a 20milp front cast of Kumsong to the Pukhan River Bluing Battles Troops from eight Chinese divi sions were thrown into the blazing battles in the wake of some of the heaviest Red artillery barrages of the war r Four Red 40000 first in rainy dark ness just before midnight Units from the four reserve divisions were fed into the bdttle as needed U S officers said The 8th Army said earlier that the Chinese had driven at least two miles southward toward the KumsongKumhwa road network below Kumsong The Chinese made their deepest penetrations at the west and cast flanks of the Allies bulge into Red lines between Kumhwa and Look out Mountain The penetrations at both ends of the front could endanger a big seg ment of tho line Associated Press Correspondent Robert Gibson 1 tho hCKirtcse sent probing units as deep as four miles behind the main fighting Some Reds were chopped down in crossfire as they tried to through Unbelievable Officers at the front called the Red artillery fire unbelievable The fighting was confused with communications hampered by sev ered wires It was a similar picture along ihe blazing front South Koreans fought to their death at many joints as the Chinese swarmed recklessly over barbed wire en tanglements and charged through Allied artillery The attack came with startling suddenness and reports trickled back slowly to 8th Army head quarters because of severed com munications The Chinese launched their mighty assault while rain and low clouds sharply cut down Allied air strikes There are no reports of action ceasing in any sector an 8th Army briefing officer said He said the situation was very fluid Beside punching through flanks the Chinese ripped smaller holes all along the line The Red drive relied heavily oa infiltrating troops who snaked across the rugged terrain and bat led South Koreans behind lines   

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