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Mason City Globe Gazette: Wednesday, July 8, 1953 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - July 8, 1953, Mason City, Iowa                                North Iowas Daily Newspaper Edited for the Home MASON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS HOME EDITION VOL Press and United Press Full Lease IT Consists Seclloni 232 Propose 50000 Courthouse Ann DISAPPOINTED Manler 13 field Me was taken off the special train headed for the Santa Ana Calif National Boy Scout Jamboree because a friend developed scarlet fever in a Scout camp infirmary where Manler was an overnight patient Sifdown Sfrikes in East Berlin By Tom Reedy BERLIN of resentful East Berlin indus trial workers staged sitdown strikes Wednesday The Rus sians apparently fearful of another bloody revolt met one of the workers demands by announcing restoration of in tracity travel The workers were demand ing also that hundreds of their comrades arrested in the antiCom munist June 17 be re leased from The workers staged the sitdown strikes in So vietoperated plants and the peo ples owned mills and factories Radio Berlin said the elevated and subway trains would run on normal schedules Thursday and all persons would be permitted to cross the border in either direction without special passes This re moved the last restriction placed on the East sector of the divided city by the Red army under mar tial law imposed after the June 17 rioting Demand Release West Berlin Police Chief Johan nes Stumm in reporting the strikes said the men were demanding re lease of all workers arrested in the June 17 revolt Earlier reports of the sitdowns touched off speculation that a new workers march on the govern ment would materialize much in the manner of the June 17 upris ing which shook the Red world and brought Soviet armored legions pouring into East Berlin This time however the East Germans apparently tried the peaceful sitdown protest rather than risk further bloody clashes with Communist arms Workers Angry Refugeesfrom East Berlin said angry workers by the hundreds had laid down their tools at the Bergman Bbrsig works the Stalin Allee housing project the Hcn ningsdorf steel mills the Siemens electrical parts plant and the Ru derstorf pottery mill Despite the new strike reports East Berlins police headquarters announced on Red radio Berlins noon broadcast that free traffic between the citys cast and west sectors would be permitted starting Thursday Since the June 17 revolt traffic between the sectors had been per mitted only to persons with special passes j Russia Ripe for Change Tito Claims BRDO Yugoslavia slavias Marshal Tito Wednesday said he believes Russia isin the midst of a real change of policy and he urged Western powers to seize this opportunity to reach a realistic international settle ment He believed the Russian changes were the result of past mistakes and weaknesses he said Tito warned thatPresident Syngman Rhee of South Korea is going too far in opposing an arm istice If they the West let him go on it could have serious con sequences Tito said Tito cautioned that the West should not demand too much of a change in Russia or expect the Kremlin to give up ail its basic aims lest it reverse its recent pol icy and try to emerge as the champion of oppressed nations But I do believe that right now they are in a phase of great ac cumulation of pressures resulting from the weaknesses and mistakes of the past and that the leaders of the Soviet Union must make great changes These changes are real and not just tactical maiieu vering and they are not yet ended About The Weather Buffalo Center Tot Smothers on Uncles Farm TITONKA Janssen 3 when he pulled a bank of hens liests down uponhis head while playing ina chicken house Tuesday on the farm of hisuncle BayKruse near here He was the son of Mr and Mrs Ernest Janssen of Buffalo Center Mason City Fair and cool Wednes clay night Low Wednesday night 50 to 53 Partly cloudy and a lit tle warmer Thursdayhigh 82 to 84 Iowa Fair andcool Wednesday night Thursday partly cloudy and a little warmer Thurs day 80 to 85 Minnesota Fair and cool Wednes day night Thursday mostly fair and warmer High Thursday 80 to 85 GlobeGazette weather data up to 8a m Wednesday Maximum 78 Minimum 48 At 8 a m 61 Precipitation Trace YEAR AGO Maximum 68 Minimum 55 Profits Tax Extended 6 Months Called Triumph for GOP Force By THE WIRE SERVICES WASHINGTON The House Ways and Means Committee Wednesday approved President Eisenhowers proposal for a six month extension of the excess prof its tax Committee members reported the vote was 16 to 9 It was a smashing triumph for the admin istration after weeks of delay and often bitter maneuvering over the bill The committee approved a straight six months extension to next Jan 1 killing all efforts to amend or soften the tax Much Opposition The legislation was approved by the committee despite the un yielding opposition of Chairman Daniel AReed Reed had succeeded in keeping the legisla tion bottled up in his committee for weeks while administration lead ers made futile attempts to get it dislodged It was not until House Republi can Jeaders threatened to bypass Reeds committee to get floor ac tion on the bill that he even went so far as to call a meeting of his com mittee He did not have the legisla tion on the agenda for considera tion Wednesday but Rep Richard M Simpson acting for the administration forces made the motion to take up the bill Is Retroactive The excess profits tax imposed on corporations which make more than normal profits expired June 30 But the present bill would restore it retroactive to that date The committee also approved legislation Wednesday to put new restrictions on the reciprocal trade program It approved a billspon sored by Simpson to establish new import restrictions on oil lead and zinc The nine who voted against the tax extension were six Republicans and three Democrats Reps Reed Thomas A Jenkins Noah M Mason Thomas B Cur tis John W Byrnes R Wis James B Utt Hale Boggs A Sidney Camp DGa and Noble J Gregory D Stranahans 70 Leads in British Open CARNOUSTIE Stranahan of Toledo 0 twice winner of the British Amateur golf title turned in a for the lead in the first round of the Brit ish Open Wednesday Stranahan caught fire on the in coming nine and moved ahead of defending champion Bobby Locke Australian Peter Thomson and Dai Rees of Wales who carded parequalling 72s Ben Hogan the US Open cham pion faltered on the 16th and 17th holes to wind up with a and a tie for fifth place with Irish man Fred Daly Farmer Killed in Collision of Auto Tractor WAUCOMA John Croatt 41 died in a hospital at New Hampton Tuesday night from injuries suf fered when a tractor he was driv ing north of Waucoma was struck by a car driven by Mark Toma sek who operates a tavern at Jack son Junction The accident hap pened onehalf mile from Croatts home Croatt was taken to the hospital where he died in a few minutes He leaves a wife and four children Death was due to chest and in ternal injuries F100PASSES TEST LOS ANGELES The YF100 SuperSabre jet has passed its maiden and the new super sonic fighter does everything we hoped says George Welch vet eran North American aviation test MODEL OF COURTHOUSE ANNEX of the Minneapolis architectural firm of Liebenberg and Kaplan Wednesday presented a scale model of a proposed courthouse annex to the Cerro Gordo County board oi su pervisors The north end fronting on 2nd N Wwith a doorway is at left while the west side frontingon Wash ington NW is completely covered with windows The GlnlioGniolle pliolo ly Mnascr main entrance would be at the southwest corner of the annex The present building is in the rear and would con nect on the first second and third floors Frohi left to right arc Supervisor John G Brown Mason City Super visor Ray D Robbins Clear Lake Architect Fred Fleisch mann Supervisor John Cahill Rockwell County Auditor Keith Raw and Architect Jacob J Liebenberg Demand Rhee Be Controlled Reds OK Further Truce Talks One Korea Is U S Ambition WASHINGTON W President Eisenhower Wednesday said this government looks forward to and intends to work for the peaceful reunification of Korea a one Korea The President declined at his news conference however to say whether he has received any in dication that South Korean Presi dent Syngman Rhee might be willing to go along with the pro posed armistice On other topics he declared the time has come to give the Ameri can people more information about the atomic energy pro gram The present law covering that matter Is outmoded he said and it is time to be more frank He also said he would have no real objection to traveling to London instead of Bermuda for a Big Three Conference with British and French leaders He added however that he has re ceived no proposalthat such a switch be made Battle Casualties Up 402 in Week WASHINGTON yP Announced U S battle in Korea reached 137914 Wednesday an in crease of 402 since last week The killedinaction total rose to with the increase AP WIrcpholo UP IN Bur gett 12 Sparta Wis looks won deringly up a tree at a light plane which was forced toland in a treetop when it ran out of gas Passengers aboard tho plane were 10000 worms which were being flown to a nearby Jake by Pilot Harlon Shotley SEOUL high command in Korea nesday agreed to put armistice machinery in motion again on Gen Mark Clarks assurances he will try to keep South Korea under control In a note delivered at Panmunjom North Korean Pre mier Kim IISung and Gen Pens Tehliuui cleared t U c way for n truce after three years of warfare unless South Ko rea continues to fight The note handed to Allied liai son officers told Clark his hand nnmist Rhee ling of the Syngman Rhee revolt was unsatisfactory but did not de mand return of 27000 antiCom North Koreans freed by Meets With Rhca In a second major development of the day Assistant Secretary of State Walter S Robertson met for 75 minutes with Rhee and appar ently received an important deci sion from the aged South Korean president Robertson President E i s e n howcrs personal truce expediter emerged from the meeting smiling but told newsmen he had prom ised Rhee not to disclose the de velopment They had been deadlocked on Rhees demand for a 90day time imit on a postarmistice political conference which will attempt to settle Koreas future He also wants a mutual security pack with the United Stales Date Not Set Establishment of a date for the armistice signing and the time for the neutral nation prisoner com mission appeared to be the only items left for discussion at Pan munjom Clark was expected to propose a meeting for liaison of ficers Thursday to work out those details The Red note to Clark was an answer to his letter of June 29 in Ahich he disclaimed responsibility for Rhees action in releasing the antiCommunist captives and said it would be impossible to recover them Shortly after the Communists protested Rhees release of the North Koreans the United Nations reminded the Reds they had turned loose South Korean captives in North Korea on the ground they did not wish to return to their home land Reds Launch New Attacks SEOUL WA Chinese lied to 1000 a new attack on Arrowhead Ridge where South Koreans had defeated them in a 40hour Western Fronl battle which ended Wednesday The Red assault met by the vic toryflushed South Korean Second Division raged on into the pre dawn hours Thursday Korean The fighting broke a brief lull which developed after U S and South Korean infantrymen had smashed onslaughts opened by 6000 Reds against Arrowhead and Pork Chop Hill The U S Seventh Division still was working on small knots of Chi nese holed up in bunkers on the west side of Pork Chop YOUTH DROWNS BLAKESBURG unLee Archer 11 son of Mr and Mrs L W Arch er of near Biakesburg drowned late Tuesday while swimming in a farm pond SAME UUck lrafflo deitk in past 2 Third Victim of Crash Is Claimed SEYMOUR W Martha Picker ing 8of West DCS Moines died in a hospital at CenlcrvJlle Wed nesday thenthird victim of a car train collision near here The girl was riding in a car Tuesday with Mrs Eugene Glenn wife of a Promise City farmcrand her daughter Mary Ann 7 Mar tha the daughter of Mr and Mrs Vernon Pickering is a niece of Mrs Glenn Both Mrs Glenn and her daugh ter were killed in the collision of their car with a Milwaukee freight train at a crossing on A gravel road near here Missouri Asks for Federal Droygfit JEFFERSON CITY Mo Mlssourl Wpdncsday joined the Jis of stales asking federal disastei relief as a result ot a long South wcst drought Goy Phil M Donelly notifiec President Eisenhower and Mis sourl congressmen that lie had de dared 43 Missouri counties a drought disaster areas and 15 other counties most of them ii Southern Missouri as bordcrlin cases He urged the counties lie made eligible for federal aid to relicvt farmers in the area where th drought has lasted two years Meanwhile Minnesota state offi cials offered to open up hati states rainsoaked and lush pastures to cattle from the Southwest td heat off n meat shortage Goy C Elmer Anderson sale Minnesota farmlands had plenty o moisture and residents were cor tainly in position to share that for une with others Taft Undergoes Stomach Surgery NEW YORK LflSen Robert A Taft ROhio Wednesday under went an exploratory operation in volving the abdominal wall A New York Hospital bulletin said He stood the operation well and us condition is good Taft the Senate majority leader lad been treated previously in hos pitals at Cincinnati and Washing ton Truce Has to But Reds Add New Complications WASHINGTON willing ness to go forward promptly with final truce arrangements brought to a new peak of crisis Wednesday the Korean armistice negotiations A topranking government offi cial said a truce has got to hap pen but conceded no formula yet ound is acceptable to South Ko rean President Syngman Rhee The high official who asked not to be named evidently was ex pressing an administration deter mination to go to great lengths to obtain an armistice It was reported these might in clude an appeal to Britain and France to join Jn some form of security guarantee to South Korea which would be satisfactory to Rhcc Rhccs final attitude about the extent of his opposition to the pro posed truce has not yet been nailed down as far as official Washington knows In the circumstances two key questions apparently remain unanswered The first on which the South Ko rean leader must now makeup his mind quickly is whether he will forcibly resist establishment of the proposed armistice probably by withdrawing his troops from the United Nations Command and or dcring them to ignore a ceasefire The second question depending on the answer to the first is whether the UN Command under Gen Mark Clark can take or is willing to take measures to over come any active opposition which Rhee might order i Electron to Be Called for Bonds Old Building Will Remain A courthouse annex whicH wouldhouse all of the princi pal county offices courtrooms and jail was proposed Wed nesday by the Cerro Gordo County board of supervisors at an estimated cost ot equipped Tho threestory building with basement would front on Washing ton Avenue with an entrance also on 2nd N W The present court house would bo maintained com pletely connecting with the annex at tho first second and third floors Tho annex would bo located where the jail now stands extend ing to connect with tho present courthouse at the northwest corner It would have a ground area of 60 by 141 feet and would hide a heat ing plant for both buildings so the present plant building couid be re moved The entire oast and west walls of the building would be glass It would bo of reinforced concrete and steel construction with an en vclopo of Btono to match that in the present courthouse No Frills There will bo no frills mental effects explained Jacob J Liebenberg of tho Minneapolis architectural firm Of Licbenberg and Kaplan who c o n f e r r e d Wednesday with the supervisors about the plans It wiU be a com pletely functional office building A modular construction plan been used in order to keepithcj skel eton cost at ft minimum while pro viding a completely firepropt building to safeguard Records and also a modern jati Approximately a fourth of the floor space Is Vault space with the jail floor exceptcd Less than a one mlUjlevyoyrji period ot 10 years willbay forjtiuj building County Auditor Keith Raw said A special election will be called in the near future so that thetax payers may pass on the bond issue said the county supervisors John Cnhill Rockwell Ray D Robblns Clear Lake and John G Brown Mason City Constant Study The proposed plnns roprasenf constant study by the board sinco it was instructed by the December grand jury to proceed withPlans for remodeling or reconstruction in order to provide for safekeeping ot county records and an adequate and firesafo jail After inspecting n similar build ing at Austin Minn for whichthe Minneapolis firm was architect Ihb board has been working with Lfcbcnberg and Kaplan for many weeks on the plans with all of tho county officers called into consulta tion as well The building was planned from the inside Licbenberg explained with traffic flow as a prime con sideration Each departments re quirements and possible expansion needs were fitted to the flow dia gram which was developed by Fred Fleischmann of the architec tural firm Corridors of the building ara used by the public for transacting business with the various county offices with countertype parti ions and windows as used in Danks Expansion Room The plans also include a pros pectus for expansion in an L to he northeast from the annex in hc event that the present court louse should be removed some time in the future The ground floor of the annex would include public rest rooms he heating plant for both ngs a dead storage vault of 33 by 96 feet plus other storage space for such items as the voting machines These would be brought into tho niilding from a loading platform n the corner connecting the two mildings at the rear Just inside his rear service door would be a service elevator which also could be used by the sheriff and his dep uties for taking prisoners to the op floor Protection The first floor would Include the roasurors and auditors offices ind vaults on the west side of the orridor and the recorders office nd vaults and the oom on the east side All re work rooms and parts of their   

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