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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: July 1, 1953 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - July 1, 1953, Mason City, Iowa                                North Iowas Daily Newspaper Edited for the Home ITYGLOBEGAZETTE T H E N E WSP A P ER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH lOWANS NEIGHBORS HOME EDITION I I VOL LIX Associated Press ana United Press Kull Lease Wires Seven Cents a Copy MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY JULY 1 1953 Thin Paper Consists o Two One NO Iron Curtain Unrest Gaining jfBi Etist German Red Army Cut in Half Free Money Men to Aid in Program BERLINun Communist East Germany Wednesday was reported slashing in half its 125000 man army which so signally failed to put down the recent workers re volt The move appeared designed to free men and money for the Reds announced new program to placate the East Germans with more con suhier goods Reporting this the Sociahst edited West Berlin newspaper Tele graf said over 00000 of the Soviet trained soldiers would be sent back to industrial jobs by July 15 Army Failed The East izphe army failed dis mally when it was sent into action against the June 17 revolt Rus sian armored forces intervened to put down the rebellion The government in its new but ter instead of guns policy counts on taking the equivalent of 500 mil lion dollars a year from rearma ment funds and investing it in workers housing and consumer in dustries Several German soldiers have been executed and scores sen tenced to long prison terms by Sov iet military courts for disobedience during the revolt A lolal of 467 troops and Red peoples police de serted to West Berlin in alltime record Still Headache East Germany still was a big headache to the C o mm u n i s t s Wednesday amid reports of other workers outbreaks in Poland and Czechoslovakia In its efforts to appease millions of enemies the government 1 Released 15 Protestant clergy men from jail and took the sen tences of 15 under review with prospectsthey 50011 will re gain freedom 2 Promised an overhaul of the judicial system to establish dem ocraticMegal rights of citizens 3 Began a drastic shakeup in the statechain store system to get more goods on sale at lower prices 4 Spurred food deliveries to rcst towns where supplies of mar garine vegetables and other staples have been exhausted 5 Continued to stump factory and labor meetings confessing past oppression of the workers arid claiming the governments new course would raise living Breaks Neck Diving Into Clear Lake See Picture Page 3 Robert E Wageman 22 Omaha was reported in extremely poor condition Wednesclayniorning at a Mason City hospital from injuries he suffered late Tuesday after noon when he dived into feet of water at Clear Lake Wageman a dock worker dur ing the summer months suffered a broken vertebra and was paral yzed from the neck down as a re sult of diving into the shallow wa ter He was semiconscious Wed nesday CleatLake police credited a 13 yearold Boy Scout with rescuing Wageman The Scout Jack Stunk ard and another youth Tommy Petersen 12 were near the City Dock ontheir bicycles when they saw Wageman dive into the water Stunkard said he noticed that Wageman did not come up immedi ately He jumped into the water after seeing Wagemans body drifting Stunkard pulled Wage mans head above water An un identified man who was sitting nearby saw Stunkard struggling and came to the rescue Police said that Stunkard and the unidentified man pulled Wageman ashore Stuiikard began giving W a g em a n artificial respiration while Pelersen called police a doc tor and two Red Cross water safe ty instructors Mrs Val Anderson and Joan MilesWhile the artifi cial respiration work was going on the unidentified man dis appeared pieced together this jrtory of the accident Wageman had finished working the docks about He went AP Wlropholo TRAFFIC THROUGH IRON CURTAIN traffic moves on Berlins Prinzenstrasse between Kreuz berg borough in the American sector foreground and Mitte borough in the Soviet sector of the dividedCity Wednesday as Soviet restiictions appeared to be easing following East Berlin uprisings An East Berlin police checkpoint was distributing passes freely Wednesday f aid Production Controls on Wheat Says Ezra Benson to his rooming house and changed to his swimming suit1 returned to the City DocJc on the west end of Maine Avenue and dived in Po lice said that apparently Wage man did not know thedepth of the water at that sppt The distance from the dock planking to the bot tom of the Jake where Wageman went inis about four feet Wagemans parents Mr and Mrs William F Wageman ar rived In Mason City Wednesday morning to be at their sons bed side Train Rams Kills 8 Cows Near Bode BODE A freighl train plowed into a herd of milk cows which were crossing the tracks near here Tuesday evening killing eight of Uieanimals valued at about each or a total1 loss of Antone Waecheter farmer six miles northwest of here said his son was driving a herd of 18 cows home from the pasture A Rock Island passenger train late had gone past and hjs son then drove Ihe catlle across the traces A freight train following the passenger train hit tlic cows Approve Contract for Britt Paving AMES bids on Ihree paving projects were among offers approved Wednesday by Ihe Iowa Highway Commission Conlracls recommended for ac ceptance included Clinton 68 of a mile of paving in Clinton on U S 67 Quad CJty Const Co Rock Island HI at Scott 119 miles of pav ing on US 61 in Davenport Cen tral Engineering Co Davenport at Hancock 65 of a mile of paving on U S 18 in Britl Fred Carlson Co Decorah WASHINGTON of Agriculture Benson waited until the final day Wednesday to announce that rigid production controls wil be invoked oh the 1954 wheat crop Id keep surpluses from getting much if any larger Crop control laws require the secretary to announce marketing quotas not later than July 1 for the following years crop if sup plies at the lime are of a size legally defined as surplus Lalesl reporls on Ihis years produclion plus reserves from past cropsj indicale a total supply of slightly more than 1700000000 bushels the largest of record and around 700 million bushels more thanmarkets are expected to take before the 1954 crop is harvested Possible Action Benson apparently waited unli Wednesday for possible action by Congress to make next years cut back in production less drastic than would be required under pres ent law Under existing law the 1954 planting would have to be 55 million acres a reduction of 30 per cent from this years 78 mil lion acres The House has passed a bill to sel Ihe allotment1 at 66 million acresa cut of 15 per cent The Senate has before it a measure to fix the allotmenl at 02 million acres but has not acted Until July 15 Thelaw gives Benson until July 15 lo announce the hence the exlent of Ihe produclion cul he would impose Individual quolas in turn will be in line with the nalional allolment Quotas must be submitted to a referendum of affected wheat grow ers Present law requires such an election lo be held not later than July 24 But Congress may post pone the referendum unlil Aug 14 Such an cxlensioh would be made lo give Ihe department more time to individual planting shares for farmers and get projer notices fo them Quotas require the approval of at least twolhirds of the growers voting More Gunfire Cracks Over East Berlin BERLIN and ma chinc gun fire crackled over Soviet Berlin early Wednesday indicating lew outbreaks in the German rc olt against Red rule Western authorities said there vas no immediate indication of he nature or extent of the new clashes that began Tuesday night Soviet authorities Tuesday ended he curfew clamped on Red Berlin vhen the rebellion began two veeks ago They apparently be ieved the city had been cowed by Russian bayonet rule but Wednes lays reports made it appear their optimism was premature Fountairihead East Berlin was the fountainhcacl of the strikes and riots that flashed across Soviet Germany in midJune d which were still continuing al many points in the puppet state Western police stationed along the 28mile boundary between Easl and West Berlin said scalterec gunfire could be heard Ihrpughou e night The heaviest volleys were fared between 11 p m and J a hours during which the ciirfew had beenin force The new outbreaks in Berlir came less than 24 hours after a wave of housewives hunger riots had jarred the Red regime Com munist authorities rushed emcrgcn cy food supplies to key points ii their zone Wednesday in an eftor to appease the angry women Iri Austria same Aiistria 300 workers cscapcd polilica prisoners in the Dresden area dur ing the June 17 riots which tbucliet off the antiRed revolt in Gerrnany Jj was the bloodiest incident re ported so far in the twoweek re during which 50000 Ger mans had been arrested at leas 68 slain by Soviet firing squads and thousands reported exiled to the East An Austrian who claims to bt one of 80 political prisoners re leased during the Dresden riots said in a radio interview that Rus sian machinegunners killed 250 workers in a clash at the prison Fifty of the escaped prisonerswere shot down later in a clash near the West German border he said Senate Vote Ends MSA July 7V 1955 WASHINGTON h e Senate Wednesday voted to end the Mu tual Security Administralion July 1 1955 and slop actual foreign aid spending one year later The amendment was adopted by voice vote with no objection 1 had the support of Acting Repub lican Leader Knowland RCalif Democratic Sens M a n s f i c 1 Mont and George Ga proposed the culoff date and Georgerank ing minority ate Foreign Relations Committee said From now on I will not supporl for mutual security George said the only way for Europe lo slay on its own feel is lo Icl Ihem find a way Ihemselves to do it The Mutual Security Adminis trillion has conducted US foreign aid since 1951 It succeeded the Economic Cooperation Adminis tralion known as the Marshall Plan George said If afler seven years European free nations arc not on their own feet they never will be Mansfield originaiiy had planned an amendment culling out MSA next July bul allowing Ihrce years for Ihe agency to spend unspent funds voled up lo July 1 1954 He changed Ihese dates at the re qucsl of Knowland who said he would Ihen support Ihe amend ment The administration had requeslec the program be conlinued to 1958 The committee cul this lo July 1956 AIR CONDITIONED tho temperature at 98 degrees at Chicago Wed nesday cool comfort was found by David Kopple left oH Gary Intl and Dirk Van Dam of Walden N Yv while they fished They kept the engine runningon their light piano hn nifmp f ll P nnnl 1 nlro u f to propel thecool lake breeze pay t them See Truce Showdown Soon SEOUL ers truce emissary postponed his sixth meeting with President Syng rnan Rhec Wednesday amid pre dictions that a showdown is coin ing soon on Rhees stubborn re LUsal to accept a Korean armistice An authoritative source said the U S has made concessions iniari effort to win Rheo over to a truce but the defiant old statesman in jected new demands after declar ing I all my demands have been met high officials both here and in Washington made jl clear that the Allies will sign 6n armistice with the Communists even if South Korea refuses to co operate Secret And Gen Mark Clark the UN commander called a secret Con ference of his lop generals and admirals in Tokyo Washington sources indicated the showdown with Rhec might come within 24 hours The high official who talked with newsmen here Wednesday said Assistant Secretary of State Waiter S Robertson Eisenhow ers truce troubleshooter agreed tentatively to a joinl U SKorean walkout from a poslarmistice peace conference if the Reds at cmpt to win advantages they could not win on the battlefield Red InfiltraHon The source said that among the advantages would be Red infiltra ion into South Korea during a rucc There also were reports that a proposed mutual defense pact to Tiect Rhees No 1 demand has 3een drafted but there was no official confirmation The source said When we came nto Korea President Rhce in voked free world unity We in the CJS paid a tremendous price It was lie who asked us to come in And casualties have mounted while the Soulh Korean govern ment held off Now Ihe source went on Rhec is slubbornly against the spirit free world unity About The Weather City Partly cloudy with thunderslorms late Wednesday nightor early Thursday morning Low Wednesday night 66 to 72 Thursday partly cloudy with Ihunderslorms likely conlinued hoi and humid high 90 lo 95 Iowa Partly cloudy Wednesday highl andThursday wilh scat lered showers Cooler extreme northwest Thursday Low Wednesday 72 to 78 High Thurs day 80 lo 85 norlhwest 90 to 95 southeast Minnesota Partly cloudy showers arid thunderslorms A lillle cool er extreme norlhwest Wednesday night and in south and central Thursday Low Wednesday night 55 to 62 extreme northwest 68 lo 7S extreme soulhcast GlobeGazette weather data up lo 8 a m Wednesday Maximum 92 Minimum 70 At 8 a m 78 Hes Against Television NEW YORK man flushing two sharp knives invaded a Co lumbin Broadcasting System television studio Tuesday stubbed a cumiramiin nnd banged an actor overthe head with a water pilchor He Inter told policehe hates television and to kill a TV operator The assault broke up nn afternoon rehciirHal of Iho TV network drama City Hospital and Tuesday night CBS substituted a show filmed Several weeks ago The attacker identified by police as Richard Quijghan 20 of New York is a war veleran House Tries Hiking Defense i i i v Budget Vote Is Thursday tt Els onhowgr said unrest scorns to bo spreadingMiko iro behind the Iron This demonstrates v tliatj people vho have kno wn freedom areArwill ng to sacrlfice lifo itself tof regain I tlttf President told a fcronce fv Ho ruled out however anyac ivo support by the vUnited States or revolts in the satellite coun tries in Korea Elsenhower also shld he believes with very deep conviction that a satisfactory conclusion of the Ko rean war bo worked out Ho described present 1 nego tiations with South Presi dent Syngman Hhee situation bufsn id1 A nVeric ana should not bo loo discouraged Eisenhower added quickly that hcse Differences with Rhee are very real rf On matters tho President 1 Said Secretary of State get clear directive making what books bo stocked in tho overseas libraries maintained by thoSlnto Department i he said1 Lcntion to tlio law nllefwihg Hhese librnries to be set tivr makes it plain the btnrles should bo about American life jnnd Ilia American system of government v WASHINCfTON MtPresidcsnl Ei senhowers military prestige was thrown Wednesday into a cam paign to ward off House increases In the coining years 1951 billion dollar defense budget A Democratic move was under way lo restore more than one bil lion dollars eut from new Air Force funds for the fiscal year starling Wednesday Hep Scrivner RKan said la a speech opening1 debate thai the only Issue on the defense budget is a choice between the Eisen howerbacked 120wlng Air Force and the 143wlng goal rscl Ihrcc years ago by the Joinl Chiefs of Staff Thursday The House argued the question with a vote due Thursday on the budget This is six Jillion dollars less than former Presidenl Truman recommended and below Eisen howers minimum cut that amount by the House Appropria tions Committee The money bill earmarks these funds compared with Trumans recommendations 000 Army 591000 with the increasedue to inclusion of Korean War costs Air Force 078000000 Eisenhower r e c o m mended Rep Prico declaring Ihal unwarranted cuts of five billion dollarsin Air Force fvinds would menu wrecking the Ati Force asked the House lo i store Restore Requests Rep Mahon DTex said Jio would propose T h u iS d a y an amendmentlo restore 000 to the Air Force This ho said would be the amount rccuieslcd by Gen Hoyl rclired Air Force chief of staff as the minimum to reach 143 wings by 1957 There are 30 lo 75 planes depending upon their type in a wing EYECATCHING crowd standsoutside a Paris dress shop attractedby the novelty of n live manne quin and the costumes she is modeling The shop is using girls inntead of the usual store window dummies Ho dis play its line of bathing suits Rules Out Oft by US SaysiPebple KribSv Freedom fcrence here as to increase under standing a mtinijL Ihe oil a variety of Korea the Middle Erist IhSfNbrth Atlantic Treaty Organization Indo Chinit and world Irndel 3 Said he believes can Parly is gradually1 shoeing it can take over the responsibilities it inherited and can cqrry thorn out This comment off by a question as to whether he Is satisfied with the treatment givi en his program in Congress1 by the Republican majority l Eisenhower voluntcercdhis com monfs on tho disturbances behind tlic Iron Curtain at the beginning1 of this first mcctijig in two weeks o11 He called attention to jy West German Chancellor Ade nnucr to Iho effect that the1 rum jlinjjs of riisconlent in Ihe satellite nations disprove Red claims Workers paradise and demon slinlc llio repressions of tyranny Unit have been put on the people The revolts seem to spread like wildfire with no advance planning Eisenhower said A The incidents lie continued enforce idea that when a havelcnown freedom they t ns of top imporlanco and feel that life itself is worth spending to regain freedom v v Thornton Farmer i k Hurt by THORNTONF red 2G farmer cast of reported In fairly good condition r at Mercy Hospital in Mason Ycitir 1 Wednesday morning following an accident with a tractor cranking the tractor when it back fired striking him in tho lower portion of the body Surgery was necessary TRAFFIC VICTIM BURLINGTON WStaney IJeon Biting Gycarold son of Mr and Mrs Ronald JBurlington was killed late Tuesday when he darted in front of a City Lines bus driven by Rodney Holnislrom24 Coroner Robert 0 Giles saidfthe death was apparently accidental SAME tta 1   

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