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Mason City Globe Gazette: Friday, May 29, 1953 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - May 29, 1953, Mason City, Iowa                                North Iowas Doily Newspaper HOME EDITION bLOBE THE N I WSP A H t T H AT M A JC I S A L V NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOL LIX AMOdited Pnw ud United Press Full Lease Wires Seven a Cory MASON CITY IOWA FRIDAY MAY 1M3 V UN Holds Vital Post Truce in Paper of Two gteOon Reds Gain Outposts in Attack But British Hold The Hook R o sen her gs Execu tion Set Scheduled During Week SEOUL Saturday big Chinese spring drive forced U S and Turkish troops from two out post hills Friday but the Red waves beat in vain against The Hook a major position nearby guarding the ancient invasion road to Seoul 30 miles south The British War Office in an un usual communique announced in London that British troops in flicted a smashing defeat on the Reds at The Hook It estimated the attacking force at a brigade 6000 to 7000 men Field dispathes put the number at about 1500 15000 Chinese A total of 15000 Chinese Reds were attacking in the West and on the Central Front in their greatest offensive effort since last October but they made little progress de spite heavy casualties U S and Turkish troops pulled back from bitterlycontested out posts Vegas and Elko Thursday night A front line dispatch said Allied artillery at once loosed a furious bombardment on the two scarred heights Chinese guns replied and the artillery duel raged beneath a lull moon The Chinese Communists strik ing with 8508 men in the west while mounting a 6500 man drive in the center thus had seized three outpost hills east of the truce town of Panmunjom The third was Car son which fell Thursday night The weary Americans and Turks pulled back on orders after more than 24 hours of bloody fighting oft4n with the bayonet Rip Up Trenches Savage artillery pounding from both sides had ripped up trenches bunkers and fox holes on Vegas and Elko AP Correspondent Forrest Ed wards reported a fivemile front along the row of hills guarding the road to Seoul was one big cloud of dust smoke and explod ing shells Marine tanks stood on the main line positions and poured hundreds of high velocity shells into the Honor Old Drummer Boy DULUTH Minn hundred school children trooped to small frame hotiso near downtown Doloth Friday to pay thtir to old drummer boy of Company C Hw last surviving Union Army votoran of tho Civil War Albert Wool son 106 was up bright and oarly for tho day which tho highpoint of tho year forhim Ho pwton his bright blue Grand Army of tho Republic uniform and waited for the annual in vasion of school children to block tho street outside and serenade him Musical units complete withdrum were in the group to pay respects to the aged but still spry veteran After the serenade he scheduled a 4block walk to the Lincoln grade school to guest of honor at the Memorial Day program Skirmish Not War See No Open Break Between Ike and Taft WASHINGTON Republicans said Friday the split between President Eisenhower and Sen Robert A Taft on foreign policy represents a skirmish but not a war Sen John W Bricker one of Tafts closest politi ranks Waves of the oncoming Reds fighterbombers hurled bombs and flaming jellied gaso line on the attackers The fivemile front stretched Harvester Will Change Work Contract CHICAGO International Harvester Company saysno to in terim union contract concessions of its to those granted by the big three in the auto industry We disagree with the theory that a contract is subject to change whenever one ol the parties wants further concessions McCaffrey told the work ers in a letter At the same time McCaffrey gave notice that a two cent an hour wage reduction become effective Monday He recalled in that connection that Harvester contracts with AFL CIO and other unions have cost of living escalator clauses and that government fig ures issued Wednesday showed a decline which would amount to a two cent an hour decrease in wages or the threemonth period start ing Monday McCaffrey said the company agreed to meet with the union representing its employes to dis cuss what may be done after Ihe bureau of labor statistics old index ceases to apply after June 30 allies told a reporter that iring the differences is wholesome because it tears way the secrecy prevailing in the from a point about five miles northeast of Panmunjom the hill outposts to the larger po sition of The Hook which is 10 miles northeast of the truce town British commonwealth troops last were reported standing firm on The Hook where two Chinese battalions about hurled back 1500 we re Mason City to Observe Memorial Day With Program Mason Citys Memorial Day ob servance will start with a parade at 9 am Tyler Stewart chairman of the Mason City Memorial AssOr ciation reminded North lowans Friday Following the parade down Fed eral Avenue there willbe a pro gram in Central Park with the Rev Wilbur F Dierking pastor of the FirstPresbyterian Church as the speaker There will be music by the Mu nicipal Band and soloists Mrs Paul A Peterson and Miss Helen Johnson Seats will be provided for all those attending the program Slew art said and in case of rain the exercises will be moved to the Cecil Theater at am No Turkey for Prison Inmates MINEOLA NY at the county jail here will ge cranberries and fixings nex Thanksgiving but rib turkey Nas sau County Sheriff H Alfred Vo mer said Friday Volmer substituted hamburge for turkey on the jails menu afte officials of the jails farm reporte that 35 turkeys had been stolen ast No No Open Break open break between the resident and the Senate Republi an leader was anticipated by re ponsible GOP legislators despite IT Eisenhowers blunt no to afts suggestion that the Umtec States forget about the United Nations as far as the Korean wa s concerned There was some c o m m e n among the Presidents friends o Capitol Hill that Mr Eisenhowe may henceforth express himsel more often and more vehementl on current firm repu diatibn of Tafts ideas was see by some as the beginning of mor positive leadership from th White House Sen John DAla and other Democrats hailed th Presidents nevys conference state ment of Thursday as one confirm ing basic U S foreign policy a they understand it Good Policy I think thePresidents remarks reflect the view of the overwhelm ing majority in Congress and the preponderant thinking in the coun of Jline 15 NEW Condemned torn spies JuliuS aridEthel Rosen ergwere sentenced Friday to die n Sing Sing Prison electric chair le week of June15 This was the fourth time that ederaV Judge Irving R Kaufman ad set the execution date amid a maze of legal defense maneuvers vhich are still continuing Defense counsel ought to have Judge Kaufman wstpone the setting of the date until next Monday In Death House The Rosenbergs were accused of conspiracy to pass atom bomb se crets to Soviet Russia They are in he Sing Sing death house Their attorney Emanuel H Jloch was not in court Friday His father Alexander Bloch also an attorney represented the con demned couple Federalattorneys firmly opposed he defense move to delay setting of a date Bloch told the court r In view of the fact that my son las two motions scheduled for ar jument in this courthouse on Mon day in relation to this case j I am asking that you set an execution date at 2 p m on Monday Opposes Do ay U S Attorney J Edward Lunv bard sprang to his feet and de clared I oppose any delay in this mat ter It is now quite apparent that it is the plan of the defendants to bring one motion after another to AF Wlrephoto REHEARSAL FOR in morning dress grey top hats and carrying their golddecorated pikes members of the Queens bodyguard of the Honorable Corps of Gentlemen at Arms walk through the rain after attending a hearsal for the coronation at Westminster Abbey Rehearsal for Coronation Ceremony Communists Reject Main Truce Point Disposition of POWs Is Reason MUNSAN Ut Communisfa rejected outright at least one ma jor reported concession of arnew Allied truce plan submitted in tec ret sessions Monday at jom it was disclosed Friday The plan had been called a ornever offer by K many I sources and the Reds had been expected to answer it at next Mondays meet ing first aftera weeklongrecess The Communists turned down on the spot an Allied proposal that ultimate disposition ofany Red prisoners who refuse to go home be left to the United Nations The Allies had insisted ly that these prisoners freed if they still balkafter a limited postarmistice of Red planations ri a W However excerptsof meetingquoted North Korean Nam II as saying the Reds wont accept either proposalvHe made clear the Communists dont like the newplan orthe old one Some48500 prisoners in Allied amps have refused1 to go back to LONDON UP The two andj one half hour ceremony of corona tion was given a full dress rehear sal at Westminister Abbey Friday with 1200 persons participating Hundreds of police held back a huge crowd which had massed out side the abbey under murky over postpone this as long as possible The government takes the stand that these moves are frivolous and are being made for the deliberate purpose of having more time Judge Kaufman then announced briskly that he had made up his mind The dale is June 15 Mr loch Kaufman said Earlier this week the United ates Supreme Court denied the osenbergs a rehearing of their ase cast skies QueenElizabeth II was sched uled to witness the rehearsal anc perhaps take some partin it but try Sparkman down not only laid good policy but the only policy which we can fol low Mr Eisenhower in his first pub lic difference with Taft since tak ing office declared that no single free nation can live alone in the face of the Russian threat He ob served that if you are going to go it alone one place you of course go it alone everywhere He called for even closer co operation among the Allies despite irritations and frustrations whichMr Eisenhower said he shared Taft touched off the current de bate Tuesday night when he said in a speech read to a Cincinnati audience by his son that the UN as now constituted could n ev c r prevent aggression Tschudy Named to I DP A Post NEWTON UP Herbert O Tschudy advertising manager ol the Marshalltown TimesRepubli can was named executive director at the Iowa Daily Press Associa tion Friday The announcement was made by L O Brewer president of the association and publisher of the Newton Daily News Tscbudysucceeds George H Williams who resigned from IDPA to accept a similar position with Illinois Markets which has offices to Springfield HI i AP IT WAS A TIGHT Betty Weisinger 18 Grape land Tex rubs her neck as she thanks Patrolman Leonard Micharlsen for freeing her head from between the rungs of a subway exit in New York Mrs Weisinger was enroute to her first day of work for a television concern when she somehow mistook gate for an entrance turnstile The floortoceiling gate revolves to exit one person at a time and Mrs Weisinger going the wrong way got her head caught r See Red Plan for Germany BERLIN was re orted Friday by usually well in ormed sources to be planning to all for revival of fourpower Allied ule over Germany It was the off he postwar U S British French nd Soviet joint rule of defeated rermanyby dramatically Walking ut of the Allied Control Council Story Page 2 most of her role was enacted by her standin the Duchess of Nor olk The crowds got a prevue of coro nation day proceedings as golden robed officers in their court costumes followed by guards and officers in full dress uniforms nurses who will be on duty at the abbey members of the choir and 350 newspaperman who will cover the big story Using dummy regalia rfther han risk some accident with the riceless crowns swords and scept ers in the confusion of rehearsal Earl Marshal Duke of Norfolk hepherdedthe great company of eers anddignitaries in aV split second schedule The music of the service swelled larch 20 1948 in what is generally ccepled as the Kremlins dcclara on of its cold war on the West Sources close to the Soviet Con trol Commission which was dis anded Thursday by the Kremlin aid the new Soviet supreme com missar or high commissioner for fermany Vladimir Semenov will all for the revival of quadripar one of his firstacts of iffice The Soviets these sources said would use such a revived control council as a forum for Russian de mands for German unification BLAST VICTIM WAUKONWJrJames Barlow 75 was killed Thursday while blast ing stumps on his farm about ten miles southeast of here All About AP Wirephoto NAVAL ACADEMYS COLOR GIRLMargaret Johnson 19yearold blond from Bethesda Md has been picked as the 1953 U S Naval Academy color girl to reign over the commencementweek at Annapolis She is the 77th girl so honored rAtu The Weather Masen City Continued warm and humid Saturday with occasional thundershowers Iowa Saturday partly cloudy warm and humid with scattered thundershowers Minnesota Considerable cloudi ness with occasional showers and thunderstorms GlobeGazette weather data up to 8 a in Friday Maximum 75 Minimum 59 At 8 a m 75 Precipitation 03 Safety Council Estimates 240 Will Die on Highways CHICAGO IP National Safety Council predicted Fwday that 240 persons will be killed on thenations high ways during the Memorial Day weekend starting at 6 pm Friday night The expected toll would be as bad and per haps worse than that of i Ji moria7 Pay holidays in t h e past a7 council spokesman said Exact comparisons were not possible becausethis is the first twoday Memorial Day holiday since thecouncil started keeping casualtyrecords on the period in the spokesman said Ned H council presi dent said the predicted death rate cannot be taken lightly1 Wehopethe estimate is loo high and it will be if everyone looks uponKemoriar Day as an opportunity to honor the dead b protecting theliving he said Heavy trafficwasexpected dur ing the weekend although not ne cessarily of recordbreaking pro portions i About 800000 cars were expectec to leave New York City alon Friday night TheNew York Cen tralRailroadscheduled 30 extr trains for Friday night as well a extra coaches on regular sections and the Pennsylvania Rallrpa added extra sections to Washing ton D C Commnnistm The Reds have pro posed that the fate ofL those un noved explanations be left 0 a postarmistice political con ference 1 Nam said it U that the Allies propoie through the great church which lartjeen the scene of coronations or just short of years Its ransformation into a t bluegold scene of splendor was complete over prisonersto the UN which he labeled belligerent tt eijv lf French Crisis May Postpone Big 3 Parley Frances marathon political crisis may orce postponement of the JBig Three talks in Bermuda until the nd of June administration offi ials said Friday The American British and French talks were announced nine ays ago but arrangements have icen stalled while the French try o form a new government The lan had been to get the meeting underway about June 17 President Eisenhower admitted Thursday at a news conference hat the French cabinet snarl might delay Some pffi ials familiar with French politics md the intricacies of arranging nternalional talks speculated the Big Three talks will be postponed about two weeks Tho Bermuda conference be ween Mr Eisenhower Britains Prime Minister Sir Winston Chur chill and whoever is chosen rench premier attempt to brash out a joint decision on the advisability of future meeting with the Russians and patch up Allied differences on other prob ems Ttie UN Dec 5 j1952 1960 Southern Flogs at Cemetery ROCK ISLAND 111 JfhCon federate flags will fly over the graves of 1960 Confederate sol diers at Rock Island Arsenal Me morial Day Arsenal authorities said the 1960 flags will mark the first time massed Southern flags have dressed a Northern cemetery The row after row of stone mark ers always have received a Me morial Day salute along with Union dead and soldiers of other wars who are buried in National Cemetery on the Arsenal island a half mile from Rock Island in the Mississippi River A single Con federate flag usually has1 been flown at the i HOLD SOtDIIR PUSAN Korea JfiVS Army authorities Thursday night said they were holding an American soldier in connection with the fatal shooting of two Korean Island istlce plan drafted by India which provided that final UspoisUont of unwilling prisoners be left to tho UN in Letter The excerpt was revealed in a letter which Maj Gen Choi Duk Shin South Korean truce delegate delivered Thursday to the Allied delegate Lt Gen William K Harrison Jr Although not made public the letter was obtained from reliable sources which can not be identified l The Allied plan still under offi cial secrecy has rankled South Koreans Government offi cials have threatened to boycott the truce talks and possibly fight on alone unless the plan is killed or revised There were cries of fappease ment of the Communists and a sellout of South Korea In his letter to Harrison Choi specifically called on the UN truce delegation to 1 Transmit to ttio policy ing authority the opinion and rec ommendations in his letter 2 Withdraw tho latest Allied truce proposal and prepare a new proposal after the talks are re sumed Monday 3 Grant full consultation woM in Advance to the Republic Ko rea in the preparation of the nevr proposal It was known that the letter approved by President Syngman Rhee and was taken by South Ko rean government leaders to rep resent views of the Republic of Korea Unfair N Koreans President Eisenhower in Wash ington told a news conference Thursday the U S never would ac cept any solution for the war which its conscience tells it is unfair to South Korea The President said there wavering on the basic issue Mock ing an armistice No Chinese or North Koreans will be sent home against their will he said Choi listed as lihe first major concession in the new Allied plan the dropping of the Kay 13 Allied proposal to release 34000 North Koreans in South Korea immedi ately after the new plan these prisoners T along with 14500 Chinese prisoners would be turned to the custody of a 5member neutral nations repatriar tion commission AIRROTC DIES MOINES ui MtKoo Ol son Jr Moiaes Joeepk B Ryan Jr Moioei aad Mkfcaei V RoU Albert Lea tint Air HOTC will receive tbeir   

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