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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - May 28, 1953, Mason City, Iowa                                North lowat Daily Newspaper HOME EDITION GLOBEGAZETTE THi N IWS PAPER t THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS N I I 3 H O R S VOL LIX and United Preu Full Seven a Copy MASON CITY IOWA THURSDAY MAY tt 1953 Thl Paper Cotuixtf rf Two One Ike Takes Issue With Taft s UN Stand Koreans Deliver Plan Reds Blast UN Posfs in Concerted Assault SEOUL Chinese Reds sent 4500 troops smash ing into Western outposts near Panmunjom Thursday night after 6500 Communists seized five Chills in Central v Korea Intone of the biggest attacks of the year the Reds struck thunderous artillery fire in the west hitting Out posts Vegas Carson Elko East Berlin Berlin andThe Hook The Hook and Vegas two of the most bitterly fbughtpver hills in the west took the brunt of the Chi nese attack and apparently held firm The Hook one of the major po Firms UAW in Agreement on Benefits DETROIT UP General Motors Corp stepped into line with Ford and Chrysler Thursday by agree ing to monthly pensions in current fiveyear contracts with the CIO United Auto Workers With GMs assent to increase its Friday sitions guard the invasion route to Seoul from the northwest was hit by threeRed battalions near ly 2000 men in three assaults The main blow was parried but fighting still was going on early pensions the union wrapped up its drive for wage and pension im provements among the automobile industrys Big Three producers General Motors had been the first to adjust contract terms How ever GM refused at that time to go above the original to maximum monthly pattern GMs maximum was Thursdays agreement enabled GM to catch up with both Ford and Ford had been first to increase pensions Chrysler fol lowed Wednesday night The com panies pay everything above pri mary social security benefits of a month The union demanded a boost in pensions to restore the pensioners purchasing power as of 1950 when all three contracts were signed The Chrysler contract improve ments effective June 1 will apply to 114000 hourly rated and 6000 salaried employes and to about 1900 pensioners Robert W Con der Chrysler vicepresident in of industrial relations said they will add a year to the payroll An officer at the front where earlier attacks by the Reds bad been reported stalled said the skies over The Hook were lit con tinually by the fierce artillery bar rages Overrun Outpott Morse Hits i Wire Service WASHINGTON Morse IndOre said Wednesday The Associated Press is owned by pubr Ushers who are by and large re actionary businessmen and that it is a slanted news reporting service Morse declared in a Senate speech that such publishers do not like an outspoken representative of the independent party Heisaid the AP had a bunchof clever writers skilled in the use of snide reputation assassinating adjec tives The one example Morse cited in his attack on the AP a story saying Morse was smoking mad over Senate rejection of his ap peal for the posts on two key Sen ate committees which he lost after quitting the Republican party in the election campaign last fall G Milton Kelly the AP reporter who wrote the story after an inter view with Morse said Morse gave every indication of being very angry He said Morse used bitter and disparaging remarks about Cther senators However Morse said the story was a lie He said that instead of being mad he was quite amused The attacks began about 8 pni Thursday By midnight the Chi nese had overrun one outpost po sition in front of The Hook The chief Red thrusts against the main positions were repulsed in fierce handtohand fighting Allied soldiers on Vegas counter attacked before midnight and were fighting with Chinese soldiers who had swarmed into the trenches on one finger of the hill The Reds apparently were ready to throw even niore men into the swaying struggle Meantime bristling with charge of Allied appeasement and sellout in Korea the South Korean gov ernment Thursday spelled outfits opposition to the latest Allied truce proposal in a note to the Unitec Nations Command Maj Gen Choi Duk Shin South Korean truce delegate left Thurs day to deliver the message to Lt Gen William K Harrison senior Allied negotiator at Munsan Contents of the note were no made public But a Republic oi Korea spokesman said it gave de tailed expression of the ROK gov ernments recommendatons bu1 was in no way an ultimatum South Koreas foreign minister Pyun Yung Tai threatened to re sign if his government approved thestillsecret Allied proposal for breaking the prisoner of war dead lock submitted to the Reds Mon day Referring to two Red satellites Poland and nated for a fivenation commission to handle prisoners who refuse to go home Pyun said Our country will fight troops from such countries A few hours before delivery of the government note nine ROK lational assemblymen met foran tioiir with Harrison Afford to Go Alone We Must Have Friends Ike Says WASHINGTON tfi V President Eisenhower declared Thursday he doesnt share Sen Tafts view that this country might as well forget the1 United Nations as far as the Korean War is concerned J If you are going to go it alone one place you of course have to go it alone everywhere the Pres ident commented at a news con Reds tor Setup ferehce Whole Policy AP Wlrepnovo TOO SUCCESSFUL LOSES JOB Bill Brown high school senior and star athlete at suburban Yorktown Heights in New York poses at a microphone Billys broadcasts about life in a rural American town over the Voice of America will have to be discontinued The boys program has been so successful that with the recent bud get cut imposed on the Voice it no longer is financially possible to answer his growing fan mail Scene of Confusion London Jammed by Tourists There to Attend Coronation LONDON IIP Airliners bringing coronation visitors from the United States circled Londons two airports lor as much as an tiour Thursday awaiting their turn to land and throngs packing the streets almost paralyzed traffic He said too Our whole policy is based on this theory No single free nation can live alone in the world We have to have friends The importance Eisenhower at tached to his remarks was empha sized when the White House sev No Danger WASHINGTON UP Presi dent Eisenhower expressed con fidence Thursday that the ad ministrations cut in the military budget will not jeopardize na tional security Mr Eisenhower told a news conference tho reduced military budget will provide tho greatest reasonable military posture that can be maintained by tho nation on a longrangebasis eral hours after the conference authorized v direct quotation of them Ordinarily his news con ference statements may not be quoted directly London and Northolt Air ports were scenes of confu sion Hundreds of Visitors lined up for customs and immigration clearance as planes bearing more visitors droned over head Tourists were startled when 24 Negroes at London Airport sudden ly prostrated themselves in hom age to their arriving chieftain Aderimi Oni of Nigeria He wore a magnificent golden robe Police expressed growingcon cern over the milling of tourists and townsmen in the streets i The rush hour traffic jam was so heavy Wednesday night that 5 buses stood still for 15 minutes and thousands of weary unhappy work ers got out and walked home Main event Thursday was Queen Elizabeth HJs garden party on the grounds of Buckingham Palace Bright morning sunshine prom ised to make the party a gala af fairAdmission was sought so eag erly that the American Embassy in Londonallotted only 15 invitations Little Chance to Halt Reorganizing WASHINGTON UftSenate oppo nents of President Eisenhowers reorganization plan for the Agri culture Department were left Thursday with only a forlorn hope that the House would block it In the Senate Wednesday a res olution of Sen Russell DGa to reject the plan fell 20 votes short of the number required for adop tion The only Republican to vote for the resolution was Sen Langer of North Dakota Unless the House adopts a reso lution of disapproval the plan will fo into effect June 4 Eisenhower in submitting it to Congress said ft would make it possible for Secretary of Agricul tnre Benson to simplify and im prove the organization of his de partment FATHER OF THE YEARiFrank Fischette 33year old Newark N J factory worker was named thel953 Worker Father of the Year by the Day Committee demonstratesthe finer points of batting to hisson Franker 5 at their Newark home He is a field artillery veteran of World WarII U S Names British Ships Carrying Reds WASHINGTON State De artment confirmed Thursday it as evidence that two ships owned r operated by British Hong Kong irms transported Chinese Commu ist troops along the China coast uring the Korean War It named them as the Perico egistered by Wallem and Co Ltd f British Hong Kong and the liramar then owned by Wheelock larden and Co also of Hong ong The report was made public at news conference by Sen Mundt acting chairman of the e n a t e Investigations Subcom mittee which had requested it Mundt said the report leaves the next step up to the British now He said it answers their con entions that prior testimony con erning the ship incidents was too ague The State Department report was iddressed to Subcommittee Chair man McCarthy Leaving Washington on an in vestigative mission which he de lined to describe McCarthy left release of the report to Mundt r Sports Bulletin CHAMPAIGN III Big Ten Thursdiyt approved mree yoar renewal of the Rose Bowl football pact with the Pacific Coast Conference Tho undisclosedmajority vote extended through Jan bowl which would havo ondod i next Now Yoars Day under tho currant threeyear pact The President also told a news conference that the forthcoming Big Three meeting in Bermuda may not necessarily lead to a Big Four session with Russia Developments would have to jus tify a conference with Soviet lead ers he said Churchills Hopas The Big Three session is a Command in Hands Now of Civilian BERLIN took its con trol over East Germany out of the hands of the military Thursday It could mean withdrawal of troops eventually The announcement said the So viet Control Commission is abol ished Gen Vassily will handle only troops henceforth and Vladimir Semyenov returns to Ber lin as supreme commissar for the Soviet Union Abolition of the Soviet Control Commission parallels at least on paper similar steps taken long ago by the three Western Occupying U S Britain and France Sovereignty Closing down of the Control Com mission apparently means the Kremlin is prepared to accord East Germanys Communistdom inated government thetrappings if not the substance of sovereign ty In Germanyone observer commented It looks as though the Russians were just rearranging their setup to match what the Allies did a long time ago But others expressed belief there was more to the move than met the eye immediately The new commissar will watch the activity of authoritative All About The Weather Mason City Cloudyand warmer WithOccasional thundershowers Iowa Partly cloudy and warmer Thursday night and Friday Lo cal thundershowers Minnesota Considerable ness and warmer through GlobeGazette w to 8 a m Thursday Maximum Minimum At 8 a m y data op 50 55 planned meeting of Eisenhower British Prime Minister Churchill and the French premier to be tield at Bermuda in the latter part of next month Churchill has said he hopes it will be followed by a toplevel meeting with the Russians on EastWest tensions Eisenhowers declaration that he disagrees with Taft was in re sponse to a question It is the widest divergence of opinion that has developed between thePresident and the Senate Re publican leader since the new ad ministration took office Eisenhower emphasized howev er that he believes Taft has a right to his convictions The question as put to Eisen hower was whether he shares Tafts view that theUnited States might as well forgetthe United Nations as far as the Korean War is concerned Replies in Negative The President replied no Taft made the statement in a speech read for him in Cincinnati Tuesday night Taft also said at that time I think we should do our best eminent now to negotiate this truce in Ko rea and if we fail then let Eng land and our other Allies know that we are withdrawing from all fur ther peace negotiations in Korea Eisenhower after replying with a single negative to the question said he wanted to explain his po sition a bitJ He went on to say he has bad a great deal of experience ing with coalitions and that it is always a difficult task f He said it might be in certain cases forany one nation to act1 by itself Isolated Cases But Eisenhower added you cant have cooperative action in these great matters only in iso lated cases He said that if you go it alone in one1 place yeu of course have to goit alone elsewhere of taking that kind of said there must be compromises which will serve the good of all ofas These compromises be added most be between local conflicting considerations He said no single free nation can live alone in the world bat must have friends Eisenhower said he that every man is faced with irritations and frustrations in the business of trying to win world peace and that men find themselves balked organs of the German Democratic Republic s from thepointof view of their fulfillment of undertakings arising from the Potsdam decisions of the Allied Powers inGermany He also will maintain ate relations with representatives of the occupational powers of the USA Britain andPrance on questions of a general tature aris ing from agreed decisions of the four powers of Germany FIRST FAMILY HOST TO Eisenhower talk with Capt William Southwich of fieldI1K a disabled war veteran and GpL Andrew Swing his escort during a garden on the south grounds of the WruteHouse f r Chairman of Control Lt Gen Vastly Chuikov the commander of theSdviet forces in Germany has been chairman of the Soviet Control Commission estab ished when the Russians set up the East Zone Republic in 1949 But Semyenov the new missar has been a potent force in East German more than six years He was political ad visor to MarshalJVassily D Soko lovsky who wts succeeded by Chuikbv in 1949j On Jan 7 1949Semyenov was named extraordinary ambassador the Soviet Zone He was assigned various tasks in SEE STORY PAGE 2 Governor Signs Bills Taxes on Gasoline Cigarets t DBS MOINES increasing Iowas gasoline tax by a penny a gallon and its cigaret tax by a penny a pack were signed into law Thursday by Gov William ley The increases go into effect July 1 Afterthe tax take effect Iowas gas tax the East Zone including the re vival of trade between East and West Germany As the chief dip lomaticy representative of the Kremlin in East Germany he was a chief consultant of the Commu nist leaders of the East Zone gov f Would Be Replaced In April of this year it was an nounced that he would be replaced advisor to the Soviet Control Commission by Pavel F YudinOn May 1 Moscow dis closed Semyenov had been named a member of the Foreign Ministry Collegium the advisory group of the Soviet Foreign Ministry In June 1950 the Russians re placed their military men on the commission with four diplomats They included Sergei A Dengin who represented the commission in Berlin be 5 cents a gallon and its cig aret tax will be 3 cents a package The recent Iowa legislature voted the increases Welfare Program The governor also approved a bill appropriating to the State Board ofSocial Welfare for its annual welfare tfut expressed displeasure with a pro vision of the measure opening the relief rolls to public inspection He vetoed onebill and signed the two others thus clearing his desk of all legislation sentto him in the closing days of the 1953 General Assembly The bill hie vetoed would have permitted the state Board of Con troltocontract for building work at state institutions on projects not exceeding without competi tive bidding He said this was not sound public policy Road Improvements The gas tax increase was enacted to provide additional funds for road improvements and is to be effective only for the next tsvo years It will provide an estimated of extra moneyfor the primary roadsystem Two remaining bills the gover nor signed provide That funeral homes which ac cept payments in advance under pre arranged funeral plans must deposit 80 per cent of such receipts in trust funds in banks That nonprofit corporations may utilize new borrowing powers un der mortgage agreements Examination Y for Dutchman WASHINGTON Alex ander Hpltzoff Thursday ordered an examinationjof fHenry Dutchman GnihewaldWashington wirepuller to determine whether imprisonment would endanger his life or health Judge Holtzhoff postponed sen tencing of the fabulous capital character for Con until next Thursday A tc This permit a courtap poirited heart specialist to reex anune re to the judge1 who presides in US District Court If the physician finds ment would not endanger Grune walds life or health the judge made clear he intends to send him to jail The ends of justice would not bf satisfied here by a mere Judge Hollzoff commented Heordered the physical examina tion after refusing to allow Grune wald to withdraw the plea of guilty he entered 17 KOREAN FIRE TAEGU Korea tflFire swept through a girlsbig high school here Thursdayonly a few hours after flames leveled a refugee shelter leaving 1500 antiCommu nist NorthKoreans homeless Dim View of Threat to WASHINGTON Ml President Eisenhower said Thursday he does not believe Red China should be admitted to the United Nations under present world circum stances He added however it would be a very drastic thing to withdraw U S financial support from the UN if the Chinese Communists be came1 members The President were at a news conference TheSenate Appropriations Com mittee voted Thursday to shut off American contributions to the UN if Red China is ever given a seat on the UN Security Council Eisenhower said he had not read of the committees He added that so far as he knows it never has been seriously proposed by anyone in the US government that Communist China should sup plant the Nationalist government as Chinas representative in the UN i Under present circumstances with Red China seemingly under the control of the Soviet Union Eisenhowerwent on 5 he believes CommunistvChina shouUUnoibe admitted to the world organiza tion f V He declined specific the Senate committee acton but said his first reactionwas that it proposed a Very Very drastic sort of cure for what would be error H Chairman Bridge said onlythree of the amem bers opposed the ban whidi wu sponsored by Sen Bridgesindicated be thbifbt thai enate t would uphold the provisfcm 1 TherrideWwM oafea 000000 bill carrying foods the Departments House did not iiHHode in tb   

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