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Mason City Globe Gazette: Wednesday, May 27, 1953 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - May 27, 1953, Mason City, Iowa                                North Iowas Daily Newspaper HOME EDITION ON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE TMI NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS N I 1 G H B O R S VOL LIX Associated PICM United Full Lease Seven a Copy MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY MAY 27 This Paper of Two One Commies Raid Allied Field Biggest Hit Since Start of Conflict SEOUL Korea nist planes sneaked through an Al lied radar curtain Wednesday and dropped bombs on a United Na tions air base near Seoul in the biggest Red air raid since the ear ly days of the war The propellerdriven p 1 a n e s possibly as many as 15 struck and got away they could be intercepted There7 was ho im mediate estimate of da m age caused by the raiders i As the enemy aircraft neared their target the Allied base at Kimpo airfield a Red air raid alert was sounded The siren wailed all 25 mi n u tes later i The Reds obviously attempting to retaliate against continued Al lied hammering of their supply lines and strike at the of their heavy jet plane r losses car ried light bombs A 5th Air Force spokesman said radar spotters reported five planes at first but the screens later showed 15 tracks It was believed the raiders were light planes similar to the anti quated craft used by Communist Bedcheck Charlies who harass the Allies from time to time AP Wirepholo BLUEPRINT FOR DESTRUCTION Navy aerial picture marked with penciled lines by Task Force 77 In telligence officers was the blueprint followed by pilots fromthe aircraft carrier Oriskany when they recently at tacked concealed radar installations in the North Korean city of Chongjin AFTER THE BOMBS devastaSon left after bombers using the blueprint got through Bank type building target It was gutted by direct hitswith 1000 pound bonibV Other buildings designated on theblueprint wereheavilyKit J ury Finds Hinich Innocent in Fatal Shooting 6f Mike Hinich was found inndceht Tuesday after a District Court jury of six men and six women deliberated about 3Va hours Hmich63 had Been charged with the murder of his wife Dorothy in aSouth FederaltavernJuly 12 1952 Judge Tom Boynton gave the j ury its final instructions Spqlding 64 Violinist Dies NEW YORK Spalding One of the nations leading violin ists and a noted composer and author died Tuesday night of a cerebral hemorrhage He was 64 Spalding a member of the fam ous Chicago sporting goods family collapsed at his New York apart ment as he was dressing to go put The famed violinist retired from the concert stage in 1950 to devote his time to teaching writing and composing At the time of his retirement he already had written some 60 works for violin 25 for piano 30 for voice and four each for chamber music and full orchestra He also had authored a novel A Fiddle a Sword and a Lady Spalding who won a graduating diploma from the conservatory at Bologna Italy at 15 was the in stitutions youngest graduate since Mozart 133 years before He made his debut in Paris in 1905 when he was 17 Three years later he made his American debut at Carnegie Hall Spalding was active during both world wars NUNS KILLED ROME The bodies of two Buns were dug Wednesday from the ruin of a twostory orphanage dormitory which collapsed after a wind and rain storm at a m The jurors filed backinto the courtroom p m after ithey had summoned a bailiff at 3 oclock had reached a verdict Hinich his attorneys M L Ma son and John 5 StoneRobert H Shepard Cerrp Gordo ney and his assistant Bryant Judge Boynton and other officials were suinrnoned before the to the courtroom Membersof tKe jurywere HD Lqortier foreman 2324 SFederal Esther Birdsall 716 Jefferson N W Lola Boomgarden 45 23rdS W Catherine Van Buren N W GilbertDavvison 17 14th N EBFlorence Sutton 1105 Pierce N W Lyda Amundson S W Carl Banken 717 Elm Drive and WalterOswagall of Mason City G H Blackwell and Keith Crawford bothof Clear Lake and Mrs Howard Strickler Rockwell v Hinich sat grimfaced between his attorneys the same spot he occupied during T the sevenday trial as S HfMacPeak clerkof court r e a d the jurys verdict Judge Boynton then called Hinich before the bench and told him he was a free man Hinich had beenfree under 000 bond DULLES IN GREECE ATHENS Greece Secre tary of1 State John Foster Dulles arrived air from Ankara Turkey Wednesday lor talks with high Greek officials i Brodie Twin Is And Loves It CHICAGO Dee Bro die has moved off the critical list and plunged into the rigorous role of a he loves it Rodney the only headjoined Siamese twin to survive a separa tion operation was taken from his sheltered life in a hospital room yesterday and placed before a bat tery of camera snapping news A Loud Hi faced up to the occasion with a big grin and a loud Hi The photographs are in prepara ticn for the first pub lic will have of the 20monthold boy whose parents risked all in thehopethe twins would have a chance for a normal life His brother Roger died Jan 20 Mr and Mrs HoytBrodie have authorized publication of the photo graphs in newspapers magazines and newsreels June 4 when their son Rodney appears on the March of Medicine program to be telecast from the annual meeting of the American Medical Association Lolling in his baby tender in the sunswept grass court of the Illi n o is Neuropsychiatric Institute Tuesday Rodney watched the news photographers go through their paces with an interest some times bordering on fascination He even obligingly waved his rattle at them Progress Excellent Doctors described R o d n e ys progress in the last two months as excellent but he still has a long way to go v So far the top of his brain L protected only by a coverof skin and hair In another two month or so surgeons hope to build hard skull roof of bone metal or plastic and insert it under the skin cover The nurses who have cared for him daily say he is as far advanced mentally as any 20monthold boy and should make it when all sur gery and physicaltherapy is com pleted SENTENCE FIXER NEW YORK Rivlin was sentenced to a year in prison Tuesday for conspiracyto fix a 11949 basketball game in Madison Square Garden About The Weather Mason City Mostly cloudy am cool Wednesday night with occa sional sprinkles Iowa Considerable cloudiness with little change in temperature Wednesday night and Thursday Showers and thunderstorms ex treme west Minnesota Considerable cloudi ness through Thursday GlobeGazette Weather data up to 8 am Wednesday Maximum 72 Minimum 48 At 8am S3 Maximum 80 Minimum 56 Ike Taft Disagree Over UN Koreans to Offer Truce Plan ROK Will Tell Points of Program Rebel Against Allied Program SEOUL official Korea source said Thursday the Republic of Korea strongly opposed to the new Allied truce plan had drawn up one of its own and would sub mit it later in the day The source which cannot be identified said the plan would be delivered to the US truce dele gates at Munsan He did not di vulge itscontents but called it very important While the new Allied plan has not been disclosed officially South Korean officials have given out some of the particulars and have denounced it as a dishonorable and surrendering truce Object Strenuously South Koreans object strenuously to that part of the new Allied plan which would let the ultimate fate of 34000 North Korean prisoners be decided by the United Nations As sembly They insist theseprison ers who refuse to return to the Reds should be freed in South Korea as the Allies proposed re cently Maj Gen Choi Duk Shin who boycotted the armistice negotia tions when the new Allied plan was offered last Monday was said to have worked out the Korean plan with President Syngman Rhee Irate members of Korean Na tional Assembly who came to Seoul fronxjthe provisional capital at Pusan denounced the Allied plan as A nineman assembly delegation will travel to Munsan to meet Lt Gen William K Harrison senior Allied truce delegate and demand that the latest UN Command plan be scrapped Favorable Comment In many capitals of t he free world the UN proposal drew fav orable comment Both Britain and India warmly endorsed it Indian Prime Minister Nehru said he would be surprised if a ceasefire were delayed much longer The UN plan reportedly follows close ly one sponsored by India which the UN adopted last December After a meeting with South Ko rean President Syngman Rhee and other top ROK officials Assembly Vice Chairman Soon Chi Yung im plied that pressure from Britain was partly responsible for the pro posal which he denounced as a dishonorable and surrendering truce Britishtroops in Korea should pack and go home he said British Prime Minister Churchill said his government and other United Nations were consulted in preparing the proposal The plan was handed to the Reds Monday in a secret session at Panmunjom The talks were re cessed until June 1 Reliable South Korean officials disclosed general provisions of the plan Tuesday Particularly Irate The ROK government was re ported particularly irate at the UN decision to hand balky North Korean prisoners to a five nation neutral commission for disposition An earlier Allied rejected by the Communists would have turned the North Ko reans free as civilians immediate ly after an armistice FIRE DESTROYS IMPLEMENT spectacular fire destroyed son County Implement Co early Wednesday at Winterset Extent of the not estimated but a quantity of equipment and service tools insidethe building destroyed Russians Spies Execute Four S Reds Claim Men Were to Get Secrets Soviet govern ment charged the United States Wednesday with parachuting four apparently of Ukrainian orRussian the Ukraine a month ago A communique saicl he four had been arrested tried and executed The announcement from the Min istry of Internal Affairs said the our admitted at their trial that hey jumped into theUkraine one of the republics of the Soviet Union on April 26 from an unmarked ourmotored American plane It said they confessed they were sent in on diversionist terrorist and espionageassignments The communique said the men claimed the American Intelligence Service had ordered theni to settle in Kiev Odessa and had equipped theni with radios for con Lact with American spy centers in West Germany they were ordered to murder Soviet citizens if necessary in order to obtain identification certificates to replace forged papers they when they jumped The men executed by firing squad were identified as AlexaTi der Vasilieyich Lakhnp Alexander Nikblaevich Makoy Sergi lozisirno vich Gorbunov andpmitriNikd laevich Remigi On April 23 the reportsaid an American Intelligence officer took them to Athens Greece andthey were flown into Soviet territory It said they were outfitted with false Soviet passports forged milii tary papers firearms poisons and Americanmade radio sets Rosenbergs Lawyer Files New Application in Court NEW YORK tfl An application U vacate the death sentences of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg con victed atom spies was filed in Federal Court Wednesday by De fense Counsel Emanuel H Bloch Bloch contended that the death sentences imposed by Federal Judge Irving R Kaufman in April 1951 were illegal and that the max imum penalty under the law should have been not more than 20 years in The attorney asked for a stay of executionpending a decision by the Court of Appeals There was no indication how soon the Federal Court would act Blochs latest move to save the couple accused of giving atom bomb secrets to Russia came after the Supreme Court of the United States refused Monday for the third time to intervene Further Chief Justice Vinson Tuesday denied aBloch petition for a stay of execution for the Ros enbergs The Justice Department has indi cated the Rosenbergs would have a chance to the Sing Sing Prison electric chair if they told all they knew about espionage in the United Slates Demands Apology WASHINGTON RO said Wdnsdiy ho wants a formal apology from the public printer for what ho calls an incredible garble in the Congressional Record Bender in a House speech a couple of days ago talked about PresidentEisenhowers first four months in office The stenogra phic transcript shows that Bender said Unlike his predecessors ho Eisenhower believes in works and not pleasant conversation But this is the way it camo out in the Congressional Record Unlike his predecessors hebelieves inWords and not pleasant conversation Mother of Boys in Romania Sure Shell See Them Again NEW YORK mother of two Romanian boys whose safe ty was threatened in a Commu nist blackmail plot said Wednes day she was sure she would see them alive I be lieve in God andI believe in my new country Mrs V C Georgescu an at tractive redhaired woman of 45 called on President Eisenhower to help get her sons froni behind the Iron Curtain i Not Given Up Hope I have never given up hope that I will see my sons again she said in an interview I be JUeve in God and I believe in my new country I hope all American mothers who understand my sor will write letters to President Eisenhower1 to ask him to help me In a low firm voice marked with the trace ofanaccent Mrs Georgescu told how a member of the Romanian legation offered her husband achance tosee the boys again if he would collaborate po litically withRomanias Commu nist government Her husband re fused He Right Of course he was right she said He didntaske me before he made his decision but I told him he did the right thing The boys wouldnt inspect him he did anything else Mrs Gebrgescu clenched her hands nervously as she talked about the boys Constanrin 19 and Peter 14 whom she and her hus band left in Romania early in 1947 when they came to the United States onwhat was supposed to bcia twomonths business trip REJECT MEETINGS BONN Germany West German government has turned down a Soviet offer for direct trade negotiations despite a green light from the Western occupying era Wlrepboto LOOK AT Geor gescu and wife Lygia tookat a picture of their com still in Romania who the tried vto UM in forcing Georeeccu to spy on the US Stockman Is Freed on Bond BLOOMFIELD a 11 c r M Mayer prominent Santa Fe NM stockman indicted here on a charge of first degree murder was free Wednesday after a surety bond wasposted for him Mayer was indicted in the fatal shooting of John C Wisdom 51 Des Moincs livestock dealer on Wisdoms farm near1 here May2 Mayer claims he shot in selfde fense during an argument over money matters UN Fails in Korea Taft Says Ike Reaffirms UN Principles Eisenhower laid new stress on American and Allied support of Jnited Nations principles in tha Korean truce talks at almost the same time Sen Taft was saying Tuesday night We might as well forget the United Nations as far as the Korean War is concerned How a split this indicated between the views oj the two top Republicans was not immediately clear The White House would not talk about any subject related to that question i Reaction at Capitol Reaction at the Capitol general ly was guarded I am perfectly willing to say that if there ever was a time whenAmerica needed to be under stood for usVto understand ouralliesit is now said Chair man Wiley of the Senate Foreign Relations He Taft speechbefore going any farth er With specific regard to Eisen hower s statement Wiley said My own ideas are substantially what he said Sen H Alexander Smith a paember said is such an important matter Im tosay anything Sen Fulbright another Foreign Relationskmember told reporters I dont agree with Tafts views on Korea I dont think we can take tha position that ifa particular nego tiation doesnt turn out well we should get out of the UnitedNa said Dont Always Agree The Arkansas senator com mented that it is not likely wn will always agree with our part ners in the UN But up to now he said we have been working together I dont know of anything better at the moment am not going to elaborate on the Presidents statement Press Secretary James C Hagerty re plied to questioners at his news conference Hagerty added there would be no White House comment on the Taft remarks which were in a speech read for the senator in Cincinnati Taft himself is in a Cincinnati hos pital for a checkup The address was read by hisson Robert A Taft Jr at a dinner in his fathers honor Eisenhowers comments were in a statement which the Whita House said was issued to clear up i n s p e cified misunderstandings They were a quick followup whether intentional or not to a semiformal complaint from South Korea that the latest Western pro posal for peace terms in that coun try are completely unsatisfac tory Forced Repatriation Eisenhower aimed especially at the issue of forced repatriation of prisoners as demanded by the He saidthere will be no abandonment of the principle hat no prisoners will be driven home against their will Taft did not make any point on that issue He said I think we should do our best now negotiate this ruce and we fail then let Eng and and our other Allies know hat we are withdrawing from all further peace negotiations in Ko rea Taft said he still believes in the JN but not as an effective means a prevent He said it is mainly a meansof deterring and preventing war through peaceful persuasion Going beyond Korea Taft said I believe we might as well abandon any idea of working with the United Nations in the East and reserve to ovrielres a com pletdjr free handV i Hagerty sal did not know what Taft was to when tb White lUtemeia T   

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