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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: May 9, 1953 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - May 9, 1953, Mason City, Iowa                                r North Iowas Doily Newspaper HOME EDITION DIM CITY GLOBEGAZETTE THI NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOL LIX Prew and United Press Full Lease Wire s Seven Cents a Copy MASON CITY IOWA SATURDAY MAY 1953 Thli Paper Consists of Two One No 181 Wants Van Fleet to Aid Indochina WASHINGTON Knowland RCalif suggested Saturday that Gen James A Van Fleet would make a good man to head a US military mission to train native anti Communist troops in Indochina Knowland who heads the Senate GOP Police Committee arid is a member of the Foreign Relations Committee said he does not believe Fleets obvious differences with Gen Omar N Bradley over Korean policy should make any difference on such an assignment Should Be Pushed Van Fleet who led troops in Ko rea for 22 months has said the war Bought to be pushed to a de cision because he maintains con ditions there are more favorable NEW DELHI India Au to the Allies than to the CommuIndia C47 transport plane crashed nists Bradley chairman of the in flames early Saturday carrying Joint Chiefs of Staff has said an 18 persons to their deaths The vie allout aggressive move might tims included two touch off the wrong war at the a school teacher whose two corn wrong time in the wrong place AP Wlrephoto CHRISTINE IN Jorgensen the exGI who operation in Denmark changed her into a woman makes her vaudeville debut in Lot Angeles She was onstage 20 minutes first making a fewre marks and then narrating a trav el film she made in Denmark lowans Son Torture of March SAN PEDRO Calif Wl Re turned prisoner of war Sgt Harry A Cutting whose mother Mrs Ef fie Mapcs lives atBelle Plainc la says the Communists marched him 80 miles in 1950 despite his frozen feet and wounded leg Cutting said that after his cap ture near the Chosen Reservoir in December 1950 he received no medical attention for his frozen feet until a fellow prisoner a South Korean corpsman amputated his toes His leg woundwas leftto heal by itself and he was marched80 miles to a prison compound re ferred to by inmates as Death Valley hesaid Cutting said he saw what ap peared to be Russians manning North Korean antiaircraft bat teries Cutting who spent 29 months in Red prison camps said that for some reason unknown to him the Korean Communists censored a list of other Gl captives which he brought out with him They gave me an address book so I started a list of other Ameri can GPsheld captive there he said was said although they knew I was keeping a list However when Iwas released they took backthe book checked it very carefully and censored nearly half ofthem When I was released I stillhad a listof 74 to turn over tothe Army authori ties Who the were and why their names were removed will al ways be a mystery I guess FLOOD PREVENTION WASHINGTON Taiie RIa told the House Agriculture Committee Friday of A need for flood prevention and soil conser vation pleasures Iini his lional district i About The Weather City Cloudy windy and warm with occasional showers Saturday night Iowa Continued warm with in creasing cloudiness from the southwest Minnesota Sunday cloudy and not so warml t i Globe Gazette weather data up to 8 am 83 Minimum 51 At 8 am 65 YEAR AGO Maximum 51 Minimum 46 The Eisenhower administration has earmarked 400 million dollars Armistice Offer SAIGON Indochina f The premier of Viet Nam one of three French Associated Indo Chinese states declared Saturday he believes the Communistled Vietminh rebels may soon pro pose an armistice in their seven yearold war in Indochina Speaking in an interview the premier Nguyen Van Tarn de scribed such a move as very possible He added however that he did not think any such offer by the Vietminh would be sincere in proposed new foreign aid funds for use in financing the training equipping and eyeu paying of troops fighting the Reds in Indo china This is in addition to 60 million dollarsv in special aid Harold E Stassen the Mutual Security di rector said Friday has been trans ferred to the French government out of foreign aid moneyl Stassen saidthe French would use the money on their home finances thereby releasing funds for Indo china use Ikes Statement Stassens announcement empha sizing the administrations concern with Indochina was followed later in the day by a joint statement from President Eisenhower and Prime Minister Louis St Laurent ofCahada They declared that Red aggres sion in Laos the Indochina state being invaded by Vietminh forces casts doubt on Communist peace gestures elsewhere The statement wound up two days of conferences between Eisenhower and St Lau rent and their top aides Knowland said he believes that while the French might insist on retaining authority over the Indo china training program he be lieves Van Fleet could head a mil itary mission which would actual ly get the job done He seems to be one man with the drive and initiative to train native troops the California sen ator commented He certainly did an excellent training job of that kind in Greece and Korea headed the U S military mission neaaea me u mission to Greece In that job he helped late Friday nighl the Greek army win its warfare and Mvere taken lo the Anniston over Communist guerrillas who Memorial Hospital hoped to take over the country S Beardsley has issued a proclahospital mation designating the week be 18 Persons Die in India Plane Crash panions died a week ago in another tragic air crash The two American victims were identified as Miss Pauline Lehman 2G of Mountain Lake Minn and Ramchand Watumull 40 of Hono lulu an Indianborn member of a wealthy Hawaiian family Monsoon Storm The twoengined plane went down shortly after it took off here into a summer monsoon storm on a rou tine fivehour flight to Bombay The crash came within a week after 43 persons including three Americans died last Saturday in the crash of a British jet Comet airliner near Calcutta Miss Lehman and two of the Americans killed in last Saturdays tragedy had embarked on a pleas urebound world tour after com pleting exchange teaching assign ments in Rangoon Burma The young Minnesota school teacher who had started the trip alone with a tour of India had been scheduled to meet her two Jean S Cohen of Bal timore Md and Miss Anita Whist ler of Berkeley last Saturday She was awaiting them in a hotel lobby when she heard of their tragic deaths Just Fate Shedecided it was just fate that they had died otherteacher companions said Saturday She booked passage herself for home via Bombay and Cairo The com panions who helped her takeher baggage to the airport bus Friday night said she had no fear of fly ing but had lost heart in doing any sightseeing on the way home The other dead in Saturdays crash were listed as three German engineers a Briton arDane a Thai lander a member of Indias parlia ment and other Indians Thirteen of those aboard were passengers five were Airline officials said the fire ap parently broke out in vin engine shortly after the Douglasbuilt transport lifted into the air Flames swept back over the plane as the pilot attempted to make an emergency landing Moss Sickness During Banquet ANNISTON Ala of LIIU ju tnuece ami ivorea mu 01 Before going to Korea Van Fleet scents became ill at TT o the AnmstOn Ht2h School nimnr Eood was blamed as about 100 violently nauseated youngsters including girls in pretty evening dresses and boys in WHITE CANE WEEK XES MOINES William dinner jackets were brought to the Some appeared very sick but doc ginning May 15 as White Cane tors and nurses were too busy to Week in say whether any were seriously ill U S Allies in Agreement on Red Offer WASHINGTON of State Dulles said Sat irday the United States and the UN Allies have reached general agreement that several points of the new Com nunist Korean peace proposals need to be clarified arid per laps modified Dulles tiUld a news conference that the Com AREA POSTMASTERS CONVENE HERENearly 50 North shown receiving his identification badge from Mrs Ella McDonald Ledyard making an appearance at the registration table were left to Floyd Bishop Mitchellville area secretary William J Newcomb president Loretta Stapleton Elma and Mrs Ida E Larson Swea City general chairman of the meeting An address by Elmer G Carlson Audubon and a discussion period were among the highlights of the afternoons business session A pm banquet was to honor the 50th anni versary of the National League A talk by W Earl Hall editor of the GlobeGazette an exhibit of stamps and covers and music by the Mason City Chamber of Commerce Male Chorus also were on the evenings program GOP Dismayed on Budget He Aint a Bowler WASHINGTON Eisenhower Friday night got ribbed about his golf game by the newsmen who cover just about everything in his life but his private golf outings The White House Correspondents Association resuming an annual custom entertained the President at their first formal dinner since 1950 The reporters billed themselves as The White House Sports Writers Association for the occasion and presented a skit spoofing Mr Eisenhowers golf game The scene gate of the Burning Tee course andwas entitled Look Ahead Be Thankful He Aint a Bowler Father Charged With Murder Buries SwimStar Daughter f TARPON SPRINGS Fla Tongay came to this Florida town Saturday to bury his fiveyearold swim star daughter Kathy Miami police charged Kathy died as a result of a whipping but he insists she died as the result of an unfortunate With Tongay was his slen der blond wife Betty and their son Bubba 7 Kathys body had been sent by train from Miami where she died Wednesday The husky 36yearold exCoast Guardsman was booked at Miami ona second degree murder charge and released under bond for a hearing set for June 11 Tongay denied he had beaten Kathy as charged He said he had given full details to Miami police that Kathy was injured while prac ticing high dives from a 33foot springboard a few hours before she died in convulsions SAME Black mentis lit past24 hours U S Jets Hit Lush Red Areas SEOUL their new role of Sabre jets in fighterbomber streaked across Western Korea in record numbers Saturday blasting two lush Red supply targets while other Sabres shot down two Com munist MIGs Seventytwo Sabres flying in two waves destroyed 45 buildings in a troop concentration area not far from Panmunjom and dumped 75 tons of explosives on a supply cen ter and road at Sariwon the Air Force said The new Sabre fighlerrbombers of the 18th Wingflew 108 sorties during the day a record since the wing abandoned its slower Shoot ing Star jets BOARD OF DIRECTORS OMAHA M Harmon Sioux City la was named to the board of directors of the American Stockyards Association here Fri day Girl Faces Problem of Love or Money NEW YORK pretty Park Avenue girl Saturday faced that poignant choice Did she want wealth Or the man she loved With her 21st birthday just two weeks away Jean L Tanburn has received a court ruling that she must choose between one or the other She cant have both Caught in this classic conflict between love and money Miss Tanburn last night declined to comment on what she will do If she goes ahead with her plans to marry Donelson M Kelly Jr she forfeits her rightsto a cash inheritance and a year income from a trust fund V I The trying t dilemma resulted from a provision inx her great grandfathers iwill rthat no descen dant who marriesa person not of the Jewish faith and not of Jewish blood can benefit from the will i Kelly a Princeton University senior4 is not Jewish i He and Miss Tanburn who attended Vassar are engaged and planned to marry before he reports to the Army at Ft Sill Okla next month When the problem was put be fore Surrogate i William T Collins Friday he said Miss Tanburns Situation commands the courts sympathy Unfortunaft It is unfortunate that she cannot have botha marriage with the man of her choice and the inheri tance Present considerations which tug at her heart do notre solve the legal queries pro pounded The will is discriminatory he said butto discriminatein the disposition of property As frequent ly themotivation of a wilK So judge upheld the will of her great grandfather Abraham S Kosenthal importer who died in1938 He left bequests total ing million dollars including afortune to Miss Tanburnsfather StephenA Tanbuni who died last October Surprised at Inability to Balance WASHINGTON Repub licans expressed dismaySaturday at Secretary of the Treasury Hum phreys statement that thebudge cannot be balanced nextycTarVari that the 275 billion dollar limit o the national debt may have to b raised Few wanted to discuss on tin record what this did to hopes fo a tax reduction soon But GOP member of the taxwriting Senate Finance committee told re porters who sought comment Gentlemen thats a damnec unpleasant subject Tax Message Another Republican senator said ne had rumors Hum phreys Treasury Department wasS drafting a tax message to Con gress but he said he did not know what was in it Rep Taber chairman of he House Appropriations Commit tee and long a leader in budget cutting drives said he stilL has lope the budget can be balanced in the year starting July 1 I believe we can convince them administration officials it will be balanced Taber said House Speaker Joseph Martin RMass said he does not believe the debt celling will have to be raised lie said the fiscal picture will nppear brighter after Con gress has passed on all appropria tions Chairman Bridges RNH of the Senate Appropriations Committee said he has not given up hope a balanced budget in the new fiscal year Fiscal Humphrey made his statement to the Senate Foreign Relations Com mittee foreign aid bill for the hew fiscal year It fol owcd by a few days President Eis enhowers remark that a review of the 1954 budget indicated income could not foebalanced without Out go But the treasury secretary went further He was quoted as saying at the closed hearing that the bud let should not be balanced because hat would mean cuts endangering the nations security He f said more than twothirds of the budget 1 for security and about half he rest is fixed and can not be cut A FORTUNE BETWEEN Tanburn receives alightfrom Don M Kelly Jr for whom she would sac rifice a legacy and a yearly income from a trust f tindif she marries him Y GlobeGaxette Centennial Edition i The Centennial Edition of the GlobeGaxette will be delivered to all sub scribers von June 1 as their paper for that day Extra copitt may ob at tht office ofv the at a cost of 20 wljl mailed artywhtrt in US for an additional 10 cwrts postage Copies mailed out side US will cost M cents including postage Peron Cracks Down on U S News Agencies Dispatches Gone From Newspapers BUENOS AIRES UP Presi cnt Juan D Perons campaign gainst American press associa ions was r stepped up Saturday vhen dispatches by US news agencies disappeared t from all Juenos Aires newspapers except the Englishlanguage Herald Perons campaign was aimed en irely at the American news agen No action1 has been taken Press Freedom WASHINGTON Secretary of State Dulles said Saturday ac tions against American news services In Argentina by the Peron government appeared to be contrary to basic principles of freedom of the press He told a news conference that representations continueto be made by United States to the Argentine government as they seem necessaryBut he said he was not in the position himself to discuss the matter in detail againstthe British service Reuter or the French agency Agenc France Presse Buenos Aires news papers now are depending on thosi two services for their foreign dis atches It was the first time since iVprld War I that papers here have ailed to carry dispatches by Amer can press associations Argentina Peron has accused the American rcss associations of defaming Argentina by spreading lies dis guised as news He demanded ii May Day speechthat Congress nvestigate the U S press associa ions and both houses of Congress romptly approved a measure call ng for such an investigation The most severe move against news agencies to date was taken against the United Press which has ieen distributing news f r o ni Buenos Aires to papers in other iarts of the country over radio fa ililies operated by the govern ment Friday the UP was noti ied by Antonio Navata director the governments office of tele communications that the use pJ he radio facilities would be su cpended 16 Fifteen irovincial papers will be cut of rom UP news Navatas letter id not give any reason News Abroad No attempt was made to prevent tie UP and other American news ervices from s e n d i news broad v American news agency dispatch is were omitted Saturday from the ndependent morning newspaper ia Nacion served by the Assoeia ed Press and fromLa Prensa vhich was expropriated by the gov irnment and now subscribes to the nlernational News Service proposals were dis ussed Thursday at a White House conference and again by resident Eisenhower himself at uncheon Friday to pecify what points were objected o V Unsatisfactory The leave a number of in an unsatisfac ory unless changed there will havevto be urther He said the generalt agreement nowneeds and perhaps by envoys the na ions taking an activeipartfiri the Korean fighting Such meetings are held periodically at Department Uptake velopments r r Meantime in Panmunjom Allied ruce negotiators Baskedquestion after question aimed at forcing the Communists to spell out in detail heir compromise prisoner ex ihange plan mow the before thepro posal could be Lt Gen William Kl Harrison Jr old newsmen Rafterthe 32minute session that his barrage off ques tions did notx meanthe UNCom mand Red1 plan a We have nothing onthis malterataUfrmJjust probing for delegate said j f OtherQuestions Ike Brother in Weekend Visit STATE COLLEGE Pa dcnt Eisenhower arrived here by rain Saturday for a weekend of quiet relaxation as the guest of hi brother Drl Milton S Eisenhower resident of Pennsylvania State lollege The presidential special pulled n at m CST after an over ight trip fromWashington Eisenhower was met at the sla ion by his brother Temporary Hampton Postmaster Named WASHINGTON Cf Rep Gross RIa has recommended to the postoffice department the tppoint ncnt of Merle J McMahonV World Var IIveteran asactingpostmasT er at Hampton la succeeding Urs lone C Stevens Gross said a permanent poslmas cr for Hampton will be appointed after a civil service examination No date has been set for nists on their new plan Harrisons detailed was centered on theRedsJpropos al to have a fivenationneutral re patriation commission take cus tody of the 48500 Red prisoners who refuse to return to Commu nism How would decisions be reached Rfajority Vote Isthere a veto Harrison asked munist negotiators The iReds in their sweeping eightpoint proposal to settle the risoner lastmajor 3locktora Korean armistice pro posed tliat consist of Poland Czechoslovakia Swed en India and Harrison indicated the UN Com mand will not the Reds proposal that eventual disposition of prisoners who refuse to go home after by their own side inneutral camps be left to a postwar political conference He asked1 if the new proposal was any more than an agreement to defer thefinal solution1 of the pris oner war1 question until some fWill you indicate how the cur rent proposalcures these defects Which Languages Harrison also rasked how the commission would supervise POWs and wliich languages would n be used by the commission The meetingwas adjourned until 1 a m 8 p m CST Sat urday afterthe Reds aslced for a Harrison cautioned news me n hey were infer anything V the fact that the questionshad been advanced by him We are just trying to analyze he Harrison remarked Before this thing is over the questions have got to be answered n some way Harrison asked many questions on the Red proposal to send equal numbers of troops the fivena ion repatriation i commission to ake custodyof balkingprisoners Would tHe troops po ice civilian police oV infantry troops Divide Control How would the five nations dir ide control of the prisoner camps and would they bejointly operated by representatives of ions v f Harrison asked whether the robps would bring their own food and c prisoners woiddbe Almost all meeting was aken up by Hairisons Whence finished NamU jiskied if there wereany ndiHarrisonreplied Undx replies ydU make jaestions 1 will IX 1 f mt rf4   

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