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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: April 23, 1953 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - April 23, 1953, Mason City, Iowa                                North Iowas Daily Newspaper HOME EDITION DN QTY GLOBEGAZETTE t H I NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH I 0 A N S NEIGHBORS VOL LIX Associated Press and Unilqd Press Full Lease Wires Seven Cents a Copy MASON CITY IOWA THURSDAY APRIL 23 1953 Senate Okays Pension Plan House Sets Education Fund This Iupcr Consists of Two Ono No Beware of Red Hair LOS ANGELES of red hair a Dallas dentist warns his colleagues Dr Phillip E Williams told a State Dental Associa tion meeting Wednesday that redhaired patients are the most dif ficult because Red heads male or female always feel pain whether it is pres ent or not They have emotional complications others dont have Neither blonds nor brunettes present the same problem Brownell Asks Registration of Red Front Organizations WASHINGTON organizations frequently in the news as leftwingers Thursday got notice that Atty Gen Brownell wants them to register as othername fronts for Communism in the U S The attorney general the 1950 Internal Se curity Act to demand the reg istrations Noting that the subversive ac tivities control board last Monday ordered the American Communist Party to register as a Sovietdi Inquiry Into Red Atrocities Gets Shelved Departments Will Collect Evidence WASHINGTON proposal to inquire into Redatrocities against prisoners of war in Korea hasbeen put temporarily on a Senate shelf After being assured that the Army and State Department will step up collection of evidence with aview to later war crimes prosecu tions of the Communists forany atrocities against United Nations prisoners the Senate Appropria tions Committee dropped plans to investigate 1 Premature Some members of the commit tee said they regarded Wednes days twohour inquiry ordered by Chairman Bridges as premature Rep Judd RMinn said mean while that the Communists are using the exchange of sick and wounded prisoners to divert Amer ican attention from the main thrust Southeast Asja The drive started just after Peiping announced ac ceptance of UN proposals to ex change sick and wounded pris oners Rep Zablocki RWis said the Labs campaign is very serious and agreed with Judd that the at tack should be turned over to the UnitedNations Laos has petitioned for UN help been taken but no action has The two congressmen are mem bers of a fourman foreign affairs subcommittee which returned re cently from a swing through the Far East No Hearings The Senate committees decision not to hold hearings on the atroc ities reported in Korea was an nounced by Bridges He said Wal ter Bedell Smith under secretary cil meeting in Paris of state and other officials vtold the committee in a closed session they were concerned over the pub licity already given released sick and wounded Americans in Korea as reeled organization Brownell asked for similar orders against Ihe dozen groups he described as puppets for the party He was reported to have in prep aration additional petitions cover ing possibly as many as 13 other alleged front organizations The petition filed with the board late Wednesday included such names as the Labor Youth League successor to the Young Communist League International Workers Or der Inc Civil Rights Congress American Committee for Protec tion of the Foreign Board Jeffer son School of Social Science at New York City and the Veterans of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade which fought with the Communists against Franco jn Spains Civil War of 133637 Brownell said all of the 12 have at least one major common fea support for the Communist party line Organizations listed by Browncll issued statements in New York Wednesday night denouncing his action as unjust and pledging showdown fights including a court test of the constitutionality of the Internal Security Act U S Could Cope With Red Attack WASHINGTON was told Thursday that Western mili tary forces in Europe probably could cope with any surprise Rus sian attack but lack the reserves to meet longrange requirements This testimony came from Gen Alfred M Gruenther chief of staff to Gen Matthew B Ridgway at supreme Allied headquarters in Europe Given at a closed session of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee April public Thursday Secretary of State Dulles attend ance at the North Atlantic Coun 1 it was made coincident with Gruenther cautioned against cut ting foreign aid so Drastically lhat Ihe French and olher Allies might fear to pull out we are getting ready of European defense Million for Board Institutions DES MOINES bill setting the budgets for 10 State Board Education institutions at 192 a year for the next biennium passed in the House late Wednes day and moved on to the Senate It was the last piece of legisla tion the House was required to pass before final adjournment Although the budget total for the board of education institutions was set at the amount which would come from the state general fund would be a year The difference would be made up by use of receipts at the various institutions Pension Plan Meantime the Senate after a fivehour battle passed a bill late Wednesday to provide a new state Gas Tax Debate DES MOINES House members wrangled over the con troversial gas tax bill most of Thursday morning but went to lunch without reaching a final vote on the measure As the bill stood at noon re cess there would be a T cent a gallon increase in the state gaso line tax for two years with the anticipated a year in additional net revenue to go for use on all primary roads in cluding gravel primary roads pension plan for those public workers who will go xmder federal social security July 1 The bill was an amended House measure It requires1 no appropria tion from the state government ex cept to wind up the af fairs of lhe1946 pension law in the next two jjears A plan to submit a 75 million dollar bond issueto the voters in 1954 lost by the closevole of 25 to 24 The billfinally was passed and sent the House by a vote of 29 to 21 As the Legislature isabout to adjourn the House now finds in its lap a new version of a bill which some senators defended as a duty of the stale and which other senators called socialistic Most of the argument was over whether the Slate of Iowa has any business in the field of paying pen sions to public employes if the cost is to come out of the public treasury First Test The first Senate test came on he bond issue plan This proposed 0 issue 75 million dollars in stale bonds which would be subject to property tax The proposal was handled by Sen X T Prentis ML Ayr who claimed that any kind of new slate pension plan is unconstitu ional unless the voters approve Sen Herman B Lord Musca line chairman of a legislative itudy group chtfrged that the bond issue was an attempt to kill any proposal that would1 allow a new stale pension plan Sen Allan Vest Sue City said the Legislature will be going down a socialistic road and adopting a financial monstrosity it it ac cepts new obligations for employe pensions The House may have to settle this dispute There is what has hap pened so far HOUSE Passed a bill calling for a stale approprialion of a year for 30 years to liquidate the old state pension system enacted in 1946 Allowed refunds to former employes and to pay out all obli gations SENATE Rejected House approprialion of a year reduced benefit payments except to those already drawing them cut interest rate on employes who now have claims for refunds required that public employes come under the new state pension plan The proposed new plan will cost t public worker 316 per cent of his pay The same amount of his payroll will be paid by the em ploying body Interest rates will be reduced from 2Vz to 2 per cent on refunded contributions and higher investment returns will be sought on the amount the state retains QUITS WITH BLAST AT BUDGET Earl J poses at his home m Washington after quitting as Com missioner of Education McGrath said he could not con done budget cuts which reduce the quality of education of American McGrath personally delivered a letter of resignation and protest to the White House BULLETIN WASHINGTON UP Tht Thursday batttd down 139 to Democratic move to extend federal rent five months NEW CLOTHES NEW LIFE and hospital robes unidentified Americans repatriated at Panmunjom in the first exchange of sick and wounded prisoners of war are assisted up the ramp of an Air Force Globemaster as they leave Seoul for Japan and another lap closer home Ik e Prepared to Do Anything for Peace in Korea Released South Korean Tells of Commie Torture FREEDOM VILLAGE Korea South Korean sergeant who lost all 10 fingers told a shocking story Thursday of torture in Ko rean Communist prison camps M Sgt Kim Ka Sung 25 was among the sick and wounded Allied prisoners exchanged this week at Pan munjom He was captured by the North Koreans in 1950 He said he was taken by three Reds to a lonely village handed a shovel and ordered to dig his own grave But he said he clubbed his captors while they were lighting cigarettes seized a burp gun and killed them Kim said he was recaptured and taken to the Communist prison at Hoenyung in December 1950 and tortured for two weeks He said the Communists forced him to drink water in excessive amounts and poured hot pepper powder into his and mouth Hewas suspended from the prison ceiling with his hands and legs tied behind him and beaten he said He said that after his arms had been bound for a long time the circulation was bad and doctors told him his fingers would have to be amputated 1 doubted that he said but there wasnt much I could do He said the fingers on his right hand were amputated with a saw without anesthetic Three days later he said they cut off the fingers of his left hand with a knife Reds Promise More Prisoners No Figures on Number to Be Released PANMUNJOM Korea The Communists suddenly an nounced Thursday they would re turn more than theGOSAlhedsick and wounded war prisoners nally promised 1r x Hopes immediately were aroused that the increase would besub stantial including more ihziri the 120 Americans originally listed among the exchanges The Reds said they were re turning all sick and wounded in Vote Investigation UNITED NATIONS N Y The UN General Assembly Thurs day voted overwhelmingly for an impartial investigation of Com munist charges that American troops waged germ warfare Korea m their prison camps and also would return men recently captured at the front Gratified Gen Mark Clarks headquarters said Clark was gratified by the led announcement and it was suggested that Clark now would propose that the exchange of sick and wounded be made a continuing practice under the rules the eneva Convention American and other UN prison ers already have told of hun dreds of sick and wounded Allied prisoners ieft behind in Red hos pilals and prison camps and American casually lists in the lasl month alone have shown nearly 200 missing and presumed cither dead or captured The Reds returned another 14 Americans at the Freedom Gate exchange point Thursday including some who had survived thebitter fighting for Bunker Hill and Old Baldy less than a month ago They promised another 40 Americans for Friday bringing the total to 110 since the exchange be gan last Monday Thursdays liberated Americans told of markedly improved treat ment at the hands of the Reds than did earlier returnees Captured Recently Part of the improvement was attributed to the fact they were captured more recently than others and to the fact the Chinese gener ally have treated prisoners r belter than have the North Koreans returned Colombian said his unit ran really short of ammunition onOld Baldy The Red announcement on pris oners was ambiguous in ing but Clark apparently chose to accept it as Red agreement to the inescapable obligation of the Geneva Convention on the treat ment of sick and wounded war prisoners Thursdays Red announcement came in a fourminute meeting of Allied and Communist liaison offi cers HEADS HOSPITAL GROUP DES MOINES Charles T Patterson of Storm Lake has been named president of the Iowa Hos pital Association VETERANS RELAX ON LUXURY YACHTVeterans of the fighting in Korea take it easy on a big divan at the stern of the presidential yacht WilHamsburg durjng a cruise on the Potomac River Wednesday President Eisenhower has turned over the vacht for such Warns About Atomic Cuts Says Russia Makes Gains WASHINGTON Rep Price DI11 said Thursday Ihe new ad minislration is planning to cut spending for atomic energy to the bone at a time when the Krem lin is stepping up the tempo of its atomic effort Cuts of hundreds of millions of dollars will be made in former President Trumans two billion dol lar atomic energy budget for the year starling July l Price said in an interview However Rep W Sterling Cole chairman of the Senate House Atomic Energy Committee said in a separate inlcrview Ihe extent of has not been finally decided He expressed belief the Eisen hower administration will not touch the heart of the program because it is convinced of the importance of expanding it Price a member of Coles com mittee cautioned Congress in a speech prepared for House delivery against ill advised funds cuts He said he was not protesting ad ministration reductions but will fight against any further cuts by Congress Price and Cole agreed lhat Rus sia is making rapid progress in atomic development Overweight Hoosiers INDIANAPOLIS Ind a million overweight Hoosiers have been told bluntly to reduce They arc 10 million pounds too heavy Get nd of that middle age spread doctors said Its not a normal part of growing old The fndiana Heart Foundation launched a drive to streamline 500000 figures by an average 20 pounds each The foundation em phasizes the value of restraint at mealtime and proper exercise Grunewald Did Investigative Job for President Roosevelt WASHINGTON W Grunewald a busy man aboutWashington for many years testified Thursday that he once did an investigating job for the late President Roosevelt Tommy Corcoran onetime Roosevelt adviser asked him to do the job Grunewald said He refused to tell of the House Ways and Means subcommittee investigating tax scandals what kind of work he did for Mr Roosevelt He and his counsel William H Collins argued that questions about the nature of the investigation were not perti nent to the tax inquiry John E Tobin subcommittee counsel asked Grunewald whether he had been recommended for various investigative jobs by mem bers of Congress and other promi nent persons Yes Mr Tommy Corcoran thought I could do a job for Presi dent Roosevelt Grunewald testi fied About The Wealher Will Confer Anywhereto End Conflict Cautions Allies on Red Peace WASHINGTON wr President Eisenhower said Thursday he is o do anything and confer inywhere to bring about peace in Korea The President told anews con crence however that like every ne else he is simply waiting now o see how developments go in Korea His statements were in response o a question as to whether he felfc he chances are good for a prompt nice in Korea No Reaction In reply to another question the President said he has had no re action from the Kremlin to the world peace and disarmament plan he set forth a week ago He said the government is sludy ng and analyzing the prisoner ex change situation and that obvious ly from news stories of atrocities lomething is wrong He added that he as yet has no full and complete report on the matter and so cant determine what the actual facts are On other Announced that the National Se curity Council Jips advised him it would be advantageous to national security for the UnitedStates to participate in construction of the St Lawrence Seaway Said he believes it would have seen wise for the House to vote Funds to continue the administra jpn program for starting 35000 public housing units The House voted end the pro gram Reorganization Said he and other administra tion officials are studying plans for reorganization of both the state and the defense departments The plan will be sent to Congress soon Declared emphatically t h a t plans for defense of Europe against po s s i b 1 e Communist aggression cannot be based eiUfer on the idea hat an attack might beimmin ent or that it might come several years from now Defense plans ic added must be flexible enough o meet all emergencies Commented that this govern ment is watching the situation in Indochina very carefully es pecially in view of the invasion oC the state of Laos by Communist orces Earlier in the day Eisenhow er warned Americas Allies in the North Atlantic Alliance Thursday not to relax their rearming be cause of the Russian peace cam until the conditions for genuine peace have been firm ly established it would be fool hardy for us to deludeourselves about the dangers confronting us US Secretary of State John Foster Dulles in Paris read the Presidents message to the opening session here of a threeday meet ing of the 14nalion NATO Council of Ministers Implication Clear Eisenhowers warning did not specifically mention the r e c e n t change in the Russian line but his implication was apparent in the light ministersavowed intention to discuss fully and as say the conciliatory line Moscow has taken since the Stalin We deplore the fact Eisen lower wrote that civilized na tions are compelled at this stage of human history to devote so large a portion their energies and re sources to the purpose of military v Mason City Considerable cloudi ness Friday showers likely Iowa Friday cloudy occasional showers and not so warm Minnesota Partly cloudy north mostly cloudy south GlobeGazette weather dataUp to a m Thursday Maximum 75 Minimum 34 At 8 am 59 SAME Black mecni Irafffe   

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