Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Mason City Globe Gazette: Monday, December 15, 1952 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - December 15, 1952, Mason City, Iowa                                North Iowas Doily Newspaper Edited for MASON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS HOME EDITION VOL LIX Auoclated Pna and United Press Full Leue Sewn Cents Copy MASON CITY IOWA MONDAY DECEMBER IS W2 This Paper ConiliU ol Two One 57 One Mans Opinion A Radio Commentary By W EARL HALL Managing Editor Americans Still Like Their Gore WOT so long was in the final stages of the election campaign I received a little note from an old friend who identified himself as a voice out of the past That characterization was in reference more I think to an inclosure which accompanied the note than to the writer him self Let me proceed to identifj both The writer was Ernest R Moore of Cedar Rapids Iowa once im portantly identified with the public service in his home state but for many years associated with Ma sonry in a librarian and editorial capacity He served Iowa as Lieu tenant Governor some 30 years ago and in a primary election led a field of four for the Gubernatorial nomination But his opponents ganged up on him in the subse quent nominating convention So much for Mr Moore Now for that inclosure which accompanied his note to me It was the manu script of an address given by the eloquent Mr Moore about a quar ter of a century ago It had been prompted by the flurry of what was called debunking our national heroes Perhaps muckraking would be a more accurately de term Remembered by His Slips A man said the lowan in that speech of another day may do 999 creditable deeds and they will be forgotten or ignored But let him commit one bad act or make one false step and it will riot be for gotten nor will he be allowedto forget it Mr Moore took the position that the writers of that earlier time in our history were but catering to popular demand in writing history for the prevalent taste he ob served it is quite necessary to lean to the intimate and sensational side Faults and failings he added must be set forth in disgusting detail for it is considered mid Victorian to dwell only on vir tue And why did Mr Moore pass this old manuscript along to me Be cause as he explainedthere was something about the 52 presidential campaign particularly its final stages painfully reminiscent of that muckraking era in American history There was in his view an obvious preference in popular ap petite for the dirt rather than for the truth Washingtons Feet of Clay With that as background and preface let me dip into that re markable old manuscript for pos sible parallels Lets start with our first President When we write of Washington only passing attention should be given to his commandirig appear ance his dignity his steadfastness and courage his magnanimity his ability as a soldier and as an ad ministrator his piety and faith in an allwise Providence and the im measurable value of the service he gave in the most critical period of our history Rather shall we read with inter est and secret approval the retail of those petty things that showed him to be a human being Physical ly he was illproportioned his hands were enormous his eyes too small and too close together his nose crooked and not in the middle of his face he was awkard in his walk Then too he enjoyed the cock fights and horse races and some times wagered on the result He indulged in dances and hilarious parties He was rather oversus ceptible to feminine charms and at times had by overinterest or de votion subjected himself to the humiliation of feminine malice He drank rum but never to excess Valley Forge Forgotten Let usremember all this and forget Valley Forge and Mon moutb Trenton and Yorktown the Constitutional Convention and those eight troubled years as President when a government had not only to be run but made Mr Moore turned next to an other1 great early day American in these words Benjamin Franklin advanced science by his investigations he was a capable administrator of public affairs he promoted com mon school education he was a pioneer in good journalism he was an inaugurator of better methods in city government he was a wise diplomat and he was the much de ferredto adviser and conciliator in the Constitutional Convention which without his kindly caution night have failed in its purpose Let us forget til this and re iber as the debunker would 4CONTINUID ON PAGE 2 UN Guards Kill 82 Rioting Red Prisoners Ike Returns With Confidence of Korean Solution NEW YORK Dwight D Eisenhower returned home Sunday expressing new con fidence about the outlook for speed ing a satisfactory solution to the Korean War problem Back from a visit to the war zone and conferences in the Pacific he gave his views in two public state ments He repeated his belief however that no simple formula is at hand and he said patience foresight and common sense will be needed in finding one Ike Declares Eisenhower declared We face an enemy whom we cannot hope to impress by words however eloquent but only by deeds executed under circum stances of our own choosing The Presidentelect who goes back to work in his New York headquarters Monday prepared to map positive programs for bringing peace in no indication Sunday when he plans to meet with Gen Douglas Mac Arthur MacArthur declared in a speech in New York 10 days ago I am confident there is a clear and def inite solution to the Korean con flict Several days later Eisen hower messaged MacArthur that he would like to talk with him and MacArthur replied that he would be agreeable The two generals may meet here this week Starting Point The Presidentelect said on his return that his trip was a starting point for his own planning At La Guardia Field he said Everyone of us thinks we have learned something to make this expedition a sort startingplace from where we are going to plan the programs we are going to adopt And we expect them to be pos itive programs Because you know my friends just because one side wants peace doesnt make peace We must go ahead and do things that induce the others to want peace also This things that in duce the others to want peace also contained in an extempora neous statement at the airport Eisenhower also had a prepared statement for reporters when his Constellation landed In that he said something that sounded sim ilar to the offthecuff remark He said We face an enemy whom we cannot hope to impress by words however eloquent but only by deeds executed under circum stances of our own choosing No Indication He gave no indication of what he meant On the contrary he said he is limited in he can re port publicly As we all know he added certain aspects of bat tle problems cannot ever be dis cussed publicly The general tone of both state ments however was a qualified optimism All of us have long realized he said in the prepared statement that there can be no simple formula for bringing a swift victorious end to this war But at the very least that know ledge prepares us for whatever tough tasks lie ahead Such spir itual preparedness in our embat tled world is as necessary as phy sical armament A free citizenry expecting its soldiers honorably to face the enemy must itself honest ly face reality I return however with a re newed confidence that a satisfac tory solution in Korea can be speeded I know it will demand common sense and care much foresight and much patience But not more in Korea than anywhere else in the world is honorable peace beyond the power free men to achieve when they pursue it intell igently and energetically May Discuss Electors Gather to Name Ike President WASHINGTON nations 531 presidential elee ors Monday formally cast their votes to elect the next chief executive of the United States Under the Constitution the Electoral College has the le right if it wishes to elect REPORTED 573J3 Hope Relm ate Wau kon wa National 4 Goi meloloclsfs Assn Unit 131 500 Rock Township Farm Burcaa Mitchell County a RWG AA Amvet Wives Irlstol Happy Hustlers 4B Club Joice The Brevsei 100 500 SM Edith Rule Carrlnflon Cenny Thompson Cafe Wheelerwood Busy Bee Club Chuck David Shepard From a Friend Gertie at 315 Clear Lake Just a Club Fertile tfemory of Joe Bethlehem Lutheran Aid Mike Randall MankalKown From a Friend lear Lake DeMolay Boys THE DAYS TOTAL 1000 200 in Ml 500 2M SOO 2 Op 100 100 100 100 100 200 500 910 TOTAL TO DATE 65323 GOAL OF CAMPAIGN HTOOOO SUM STILL NEEDED 5181673 Someone Must Lead Fund Drive S SOMEBODY IN THE PLACE1 WHERE YOU WORK TAKING THE L E A D IN RAISING A COLL ECTIVE GIFT FOR CHRISTMAS CHEER In the answer to this question may rest the fate of this years solicita ion With only a little more than a fourth of the total on hand at this moment only a little more than a week remains until the campaign comes to an end on the afternoon of Wednesday Dec 24 While its true that in 26 previous ampaigns there has never been a allure thats no guarantee that this years goal will be reached Success wont be automatic The ixtra sorely needed this year will not be realized those with generous instincts do some thing about the matter The days are slipping by Theres no time to waste Either bring your gift to the GlobeGazette office or mail it to Christmas Fund Clehe Ganfte City Gov Adlai Stevenson the Democratic presidential candidate anyone else Pollsters Safe But pollsters would be taking al most no risk in predicting a 442 to 89 victory for Gen Dwight D Eis enhower Thats the way the states voters indicated they wanted their electors to vote Monday However most electors are le gally free to vote as they please Few states bind electors by law to vote for the candidate who carries the state In Iowa a lively and well informed debate on the value of the Electoral College in the modern scheme of elections could be z feature of the one and only official meeting of Iowas Presidential Electors Iowas 10 electors meet at 4 pm in the office of Gov William S Beardsley to formally cast the states total electoral vote for Dwight Eisenhower for Presi dent and Richard M Nixon for vice president Pattern Set If the electors have any discus sion on the Electoral College it might follow the pattern of their premeeting statements given by mail or telephone to The Associated Press Mrs Hiram C Houghton an electoratlarge and only woman among Iowas 10 declared in her statement on the Electoral Col lege now prescribed by the U S Constiution It seems to me that the present system is hazardous and can lead to violence Small technicalities can easily ruin this system What if a blizzard came Monday and none of us could get to Des Moines on the day set by the Constitution Our votes would not be counted This happened in Wisconsin when a heavy blizzard came the day electors were to meet Warmer Weather Moves Into Iowa DES MOINES lift Warmer weather was moving into Iowa Monday after a frosty snowflecked weekend The mercury dropped to 5 above zero at Decorah and Oelwein ear ly Monday and the Sunday high was 30 degrees at Waterloo and La moni The Weather Bureau said Mon day afternoon highs would be in the 40s in Western Iowa due to a flow of air into the state from the southwest Same os Lynes Nominated for Iowa House Speaker DES MOINES Rep WilliamS Lynes 59 Wav erly drainage engineer Monday was nominated for his sec ond consecutive term as speaker of the Iowa House of Rep resentatives The selection was made in a caucus of Repub lican House members The action is equivalent to election since 105 of the 108 of the House are Republicans f Trying to Rescue Crew IKE HOME FROM Eisenhower waves to spectators at LaGuardia Airport in New York as he strolls from his plane after completing his historic visit to Korea Herrick Named to Head State Highway Patrol DES MOINES top level shiftplacing Lt David Herrick 48 Atlantic into the post as chief of t he Iowa Highway Patrol was announced Monday by the State Safe ty Department Safety Commissioner Pearl W McMurray w h o nounced the appointment a meeting of all highway pa an trol officers in Des Moines said S N Jespersen thepresent chief had asked to be relieved of his du ties Effective Jan 1 The change is effective Jan 1 McMurray said Jespersen would remain as assistant chief to Her rick Jespersen reported he asked to be relieved because he has xom pleted his task of rebuilding the patrol from 119 men 1946 to 214 men at present Hesaid he feels the best interests of the patrol will be served by a transfer of re sponsibility now to a new man McMurry said he accepted Jes persens request with reluctance and regret Jespersen and Herrick were members of the original patrol orce of 50 men organized in Aug ust 1935 Jespersen became patrol chief in 1946 Herrick a World War II Navy veteran became lieutenant in charge of the Atlantic patrol area n August 1947 He has served the jatrpl in Sioux City Storm Lake spirit Lake Missouri Valley Des Moines Mason City and Arnolds Park MDOUl The Weather City Fair and warmer through Tuesday Low Monday night about 20 Fair with rising tempera tures Monday night and Tuesday Minnesota Fair Monday and Tues day A little warmer Monday night and in extreme south Tuesday GlobeGazette weather data up to 8 am Monday Maximum 22 Minimum 7 At 8 am J2 Strike at TriCity Newspapers DAVENPORT of TriCity Local No 107 of the A F of L International Typographical Union set up picket lines Mon day at the Davenport la Times the Moline m Dispatch and the Rock Island 111 Argus The three papers publish for aft ernoon delivery Also affected is the Davenport Democrat a morn ing paper A spokesman for one of the pa pers said the union voted Sunday night to strike as a result of a dis pute over provisions which the un ion demands in a new contract be ing negotiated Harold Clark second vice presi dent of the ITU who was sent here from the unions national head quarters at Indianapolis said the principal issue revolved around the use of teletypesetter tape in the newspaper offices The old contract expired Oct 31 and negotiations have been in pro gress since that time The publishers said they plan ned a statement later Monday Therewas no immediate word from the union Approximately 120 printers are involved The publishers said they planned to get out editions of their papers Monday The Davenport Times said that although it normally publishes three editions during each day it planned to issue a single combina tion edition Monday afternoonThe pressmen who operate under a separate contract reported for work the Times said It was the first walkout by print ers in the Quad Cities area in more than 50 years Seventh Ballot Lynes was nominated on the sev enth ballot over Rep Lawrence Putney of Gladbrook 5251 Lynes had exactly the required number of votes The two were the only candidates on the final ballot after five others dropped out at various stages the balloting Lynes becomes the fifth man to serve two consecutive terms a speaker the Iowa House in the 106 years of Iowa history The others are John H Gear Des Moines County 187476 George W Clark Dallas County 190406 Arch W McFarland Waterloo 191921 and G T Kuester Griswold 194749 Gear and Clark later be came governors and McFarland who will be a member of the 19K session served a term as lieuten ant governor after having been speaker Other Candidates The other candidates in Mon days contest were Reps A C Hanson Inwood who dropped out after the sixth ballot Guy G But ler Rolfe who withdrew after the third ballot Ernest Kosek Cedar Rapids who withdrew after the third ballot George Paul Brook yn who withdrew after the fourth jallot and Fred Schwengel Dav enport who also dropped out after the fourth ballot WILLIAM S LYNES Off Vessel LEGHORN Italy ers battled wind wave and dark ness Monday night in an attempt to rescue crewmen from the batteret stern of a U S Navy supply ship driven on the rocks and split in tw with its load of Christmas turkey for GIs in Europe Threemen of the 40 aboard hai beenhauled in a breeches buoy th perilous 100 yards from the stern of the Grommet Reefer to the sbor when darkness fell Giant Searchlights Giant searchlights of the Italian Naval Academy whose grounds are opposite the rocks on which the howling wind and gigantic waves battered the ships stern were turned on the rescue scene The wrecked ships bow was on i sand bar 400 yards away The 2460ton refrigerated supply ship was in Leghorn harbor early Monday when its anchor staried dragging in a howling gale It was drivenon the Queen of Leghorn reef and snapped in two Take Shelter The 40 crewmen tookshelter in he stern United States Navy United Siates Army and Italian Navy men onned the rescue team They rigged a breeches buoy line rom the flagpole of the Naval Academy to the ship BULLETIN WASHINGTON The Su preme Court Monday struck down Oklahomas loyalty oath law on the ground that it penal izes persons who might have ioined subversive innocently RHODES SCHOLAR DES MOINES iff Thomas A Jrown of Iowa City attending the tate University of Iowa has won a Rhodes scholarship to Oxford University in England Red China Rejects Plan to End Korean Fighting TOKYO China dashed hopes Monday for an im mediate armistice in Korea by re ecting a United Nations plan aimed at solving the deadlock on ex changing prisoners of war Peiping Radio said Chinese For eign Minister Chou EnLai had cabled formal rejectionof the plan p UN General Assembly President Lester B Pearson of Canada Chou demanded that the Assem bly cancel this illegal resolution and that the Assembly urge thc United States immediately re sume the Panmunjom truce talks The UN declared an inllefuiite recess in the truce talks on Oct 8 when the Reds refused to budge rom their insistence on the re jatriation of all Communist prison srs held by the UN The United Nations would return only those who wished to return to the Communist side The UN holds 116000 prioners including 20000 Chinese Of the total 83000 including 6400 Chi nese want to return to the Commu nists The other 33000 said they would rather die than return Chous long cable to Pearson dated Dec 14 demanded that a truce be carried out on the basis of the draft ot the Korean truce agreement Then the whole prisoner issue would be referred to a Korean Problem Commission for peaceful solution He said the Reds already had made the necessary preparations to receive joint Red Cross teams to help in the speedy repatriation of prisoners in case agreement was reached on the Reds terms Plan to Stage Big Breakout 120 Hurt in Bloody Fight PUSAN Korea illcd 82 mutinous Communist irisoners and wounded 120 on Port am Island Sunday in quelling one if the bloodiest Red riots of the Corean War The Allied Prisoner of War com mand said two American and two 3outh Korean soldiers were in ured by rockthrowing Reds Authorities said the riot by about 600 diehard civilian internees irobably was part of a known Red plan to stage a mass breakout Under Control Col C V Cadwell head of the command returned from the northwest tip of Koje night and re ported everything under control He praised the island com mander Lt ColGeorge D Miller and said Miller used sound judg nent and did not use any more orce than was necessary He noted promptly It could have jeen a very serioussituation The trouble started when prison TS in six compounds defied strict orders by organizing military drills and demonstrations Then they massed at the top of a high terrace Three ranks of prisoners with locked arms defied advancing UN troops Other pris oners behind them showered the guards with rocks Unable to advance the guards fired warning shots and ordered the Reds to stop Individual Weapons When they refused the POW command said individual weap ons were brought to bear to pre vent the entire mass from break ing out Presumably the weapons were rifles and carbines The approach to the compounds is from below preventing the effective use of con cussion grenades Tear gas gre lades could not be used becausea ligh wind was sweeping across the erraces Cadwell said the seriously in ured prisoners were taken ia anding craft to a hospital on stand about a mile and a half to he east The POW command said many of the mutineers were former in mates of compound 62 of Koje which erupted in bloody violence ast Feb 18 Eightyone Reds and one U S oldier were killed in that riot vhich triggered a whole series ot lareups and led to a stiff crack knvn by Gen Mark Clark UN ar East commander Fanatic Reds killed 115 other risoners in grabbing complete ontrol of their wireenclosing com xmnds More than 300 were killed in the riots that fol ovved Seize General On May 7 the Reds seized Brig Gen Francis T Dodd Koje camp ommander and held him hostage or 78 hours Dodds successor Brig Gen Hayden L Boatner restored or ler broke the bigger compounds nd moved all Chinese prisoners ff Koje Sundays mutiny involved re lassified Communist prisoners ot var All are Koreans probably a mixture of both North and South Coreans who cimg grimly to their Communist leadership In the mat 2r of repatriation all have elected o return to Communist control The Pongam riot is certain to revoke a strong blast from North iorean Gen Nam 11 senior Red elegate to the suspended Korean Lruce talks In the past Nam unfailingly has odged protests within a day or twa fter each such incident 3 More I o wans Die on Roads By THE ASSOCIATED PRISS Three more Ipwans have died ia utomobile accidents to bring the states 1952 motor vehicle death oil to 540 The latest victims were Donald Webster 29 Ayrshire Charles Riniker 31 Duboqo i L Lister 70 OskatooZi   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 155+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 155 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication