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Mason City Globe Gazette: Saturday, November 1, 1952 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - November 1, 1952, Mason City, Iowa                                North Iowas Doily Newspaper Edited far UM Horn LOBE HOME EDITION THENEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOL LIX Associated Press and United Presj Full Hard C Seven Cents a Copy MASON CITY IOWA SATURDAY NOVEMBER 1 ItM This Psper Consist j of Two Oat Same Terms Soft Coal Miners Got Application for WSB Approval WASHINGTON L Lewis Saturday won a pay raise of per day for 68000 hard coal miners This is the same size raise he Holds Lead in Popular Vote negotiated for the soft coal miners soft coal increase was re jected by the Wage Stabilization Board as too high and is now being considered by Economic Stabilizer Roger L Putnam Submit Application In announcing the signing of the hard coal agreement Edward G spokesman Ipr the anthracite operators said his group will sub mit an to the WSB lor approval of the hard coal wage hike The wage agreement is effective Nov 16and runs until Sept 30 1953 Signing of the agreement pre vents a walkout by the hard coal miners on Monday If Putnam turns down the soft coal wage increase however that could mean a walkout of the entire United Mine Corkers membership in both the soft and hard coal mines No Thomas Kennedy vice president of the UMW said there had been i no change in the hard coal miners fringe benefits Kennedy said that part of the Increaseiwas fringe mat tersThis statement to the argument used by the soft coal operators in their petition to PuU nam tojgrant the full per day increase instead of the ap prpyed Jy the The hard coal miners have been working under an interim agree ment providing for aboosti in wel fare fund paymentsfrom30 cents per ton to 50 cents per ton The fund increase al ready approved by the WSB will continue Ike Pushes Drive Into Final Phase CHICAGO Dwight D Eisenhower pushed his presidential campaign toward a climax Saturday with an assertion that the American people are demanding a change of government and the confident de See Gradual End to Drought in Middlewest WASHINGTON W The Weath er Bureau said Saturday it expects November to reverse the October weather pattern The bureatj said The Weather Bureaus 30day utlook for November calls for emperatures to average above easohal normals over most of the ation except for somewhat below ormalwest of the Continental Ivide This is a reversal of Octo ers temperature pattern which Precautions By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Precautions against fire mul tiplied in Iowa as the states dri est October in history was suc ceeded Saturday by a similarly dry opening day of Novemberl These were among develop ments City Manager Leonard C How ell of Des Moines declared a state of emergencyfor thVcity because of the Widespread fire danger Mayor Mowry of Mar shalltpwn issued a proclamation prohibiting the burning of leaves or any type of refuse out of doors until the drouth is over Amand will be satisfied four ays from now Eisenhower returns to New York aturday after a final foray into llinois the home state of his op oonent Gov Adlai Stevenson He as a nationwide television appear ance in the form of an interview Saturday night at 9 pm Last MajorSpeech His last major speech before the begins is scheduled lo be GlovesOff Attack on Ike by Stevenson ABOARD STEVENSON CAM PAIGN TRAIN ENROUTE TO OHIO Adlai E Stevenson campaigned into the m i d w e s Sunday to stay through election day He ended his swing in the East Friday night with a gloves off attack on his opponents foreign policy In a final bid for New Yorks 45 electoral the Democratic presidential nominee brought cheer after cheer from a Brooklyn audi ence with his jabs at G en Dwigh D Eisenhower Program Stevenson said that Eisenhower to go to Korea elected was a promise without a programand he said didn think that the American people are taken in He said the Republican presi dential nominee was seeking on easy solution after for th Korean war and attacked him fo what be called a shift toth6 pi Guard line Eisenhower Stevenson said ha eommfanted that if there must be war in Korea it should be Asian Asians Theillinols governor continued Let Asians fight Asians is th authentic Voice of a resurgent iso lationisni Old Guard In 1939 the Republican Ol Guard faced with the menace o the Nazi world was conjtent to say Let Europeans fight Europeans Ignoring completely the fact tha the menace of Nazism was a men ace to Americans as much as Frenchmen and Englishmen Stevenson asserted that the gen eraPhad recklessly gambled with the confidence of our European A ind had sliowh a willingnes to undermine the North Atlanti Treaty Organiiatioh And on th Korean war said Eisenhowe kas sought out the possibilities o division andof tnistrust vas characterized by abnormally varm weather in the West bul cool in the East The dry spell which has pre over the nationis Atpectec o give syay to substantial precipi ation in the Pacific Northwest anc n a band extending eastward from he Great Lakes to New England n states bordering the Mississipp and Ohio Rivers about normal pre cipitation is expected gradiiallj ameliorating the drought However subnormal rainfall is indicates over the Southwest and ATTORNEY D1ES DES MOINESUPI Edward R irown 75 prominent Des Moine attorney died early Saturday H vas a native of Greenfield am served as secretary to Gov Les ie Shaw delivered in Boston Monday night As the campaign drew near an end Eisenhower held inexorably to vhat he says are the four central Communism cor ruption and peace based on pros In his appearances in Chicago Friday he said the Democrats are trying to fog over these ques ions by personal attack on him and by spreading a fear7 campaign He ridiculed the personal criti cisms by reminding his audiences hat his opponents wanted him to ie their canddiate four years ago And he said the1 people are not eirig frightened by Democratic claims that a GOP victory would mean another depression cuts in social security and so on Chicago Audience He told aChicago audience Fri day night The extraordinary thing is that the opposition thought the Ameri can pepfile be so seven years6i Fair Deal misrule that they would not rise up and demand a change a change to a government of hon esty vision and courage But that demand will be satis days from now Dixie Crosby Dies at 40 BEVERLY HILLS UP Dixie Lee Crosby 40yearold wife of Crooner Bins Crosby dtedSaturr day after a lengthy illness Mrs Crosby who had been in a coma since Monday suc cumbed in her Beverly Hills home with her family by her side She became critically ill this week and doctors had said there warno chance for sur vival Exact nature of her illness has riot been disclosed by her physi cian Mrs Crosby underwent a serious abdominal operation last July AP Wirephoto MRS VAN James A Van Fleet wife of the 8th Army commander in Korea talks with newsmen about a letter writ ten by her husband and used by Gen Eisenhower in campaign speech She said she gave Eisen hower permission to use the let ter in which Van Fleet wrote that he had been unable to win approval for an increaseof two divisions or more in South Ko rean forces ROKs Claw Slowly Up Vital Peak SEOUL South Korean infan rymen clawed slowly up the shell jiasted slopesof Triangle Hill Sat urday w h i 1 warplanes Undecided Voters Still Hold Key By ARCHIBALD M CROSSLEY Director THE CROSSLEY POLL Eisenhower leads Stevenson by a mall margin of the popular vote the final poll as of the middle the week U S PROBABLE VOTERS Eisenhower 474 Stevenson 423 Other candidates 04 Undecided 99 How many of the undecided will nally vole at all and what their Itimatc choice will be is specu tive By using different methods f estimating the undecided trend ic Eisenhower figure varies from 1 per cent to 52 per cent of the olal expected vote AllocaVon ol he Undecideds according to the Tay their Decided counterparts ote in the poll would point more o the latter figure In spite of this leaning toward the epublican candidate there are our major reasons why the fina onclusion must be that the election an still go either way Narrow Margins First the extremely narrow mar ins by which states with large lectoral votes such as New York Illinois and others are likely to be ron by one side or the other The ecisiqn in some states is expected o be by fractions of one per cent thers by one or two per cent Second our electoral system yhich makes itpossible for a can blasted an effort to cut down Redfire power The indomitable ROKs were ighting to regain the prized Gen rar Front peakwhere hundreds o their countrymen in gallant dis obedience of orders sacrificec themselves Friday to block a Rec smash in the main Allied Jine Ordered to retreat when the Chi nese attacked in waves before dawn they stayed and died on tH barren peak The way back was slow and bloody But Allied air strikes a the crest were slowing the Com munist fire The enemy gunners who weri not hit kept their heads wel AP Correspondent John Randolph reported from the front Other Allied troops fought off Chinese battalion attacks agains Jane Russell Hill a lesser ridge on Triangle and Pinpoint Hill highest peak on nearby Snipe Ridge The 19 days of continuous bat tiing for tKe Kumhwa ridges ha piled up the longest and bloodies fighting of the past year ON not old enough to vote but they can help remind their Cub Scouts of Den 5 Pack 13 at Wilson School hung Liberty Bell reminders on all the doorknobs of their neighborhoodas part of the nationwide effort of the BoyScouts1 to get out the vote Afterward they decided they could do even more so they staged a pa rade in downtown Mason City From front to back are Bobby Kitsia Kenny Kota Wayne Horn and DeWayne Ceradsky all 9 years old Their den mother is Mrs A E Horn 123 Jackson SW and her assistant Mrs Mainard Larsen 727 2nd SW lar votes to win the electron ay a onsiderable majority in the elec oral college Third whatever last minute ef ect there may be of dramatic an iquncements or of aggressive pro motion by either side on the decision for whom to vote or wheth r to vote at all In 1948 nearly 00000 persons did not vote fo resident while they were in th rating booths Fourth the normal allowabl variation involved in a sample o he population particularly whe he voting intentions of one day ar projected to the action or inactio if another day In round number h Ls is usually considered as cf luree percentage point plus or minus Needed to Win With the south and border states llevenson to win needs only hi lome state ot Illinois normall Democratic Missouri and Mass husetts and the pivotal state o Vew York In a tug of war betwee the Democratic city which is cur rently two to one for Stevenson an lepubiican upstate to decide Ne York even a heavy Negro ydt could affect the result unless up state turnout is large Eisenhower supporters are sti ahead in voting interest This further shown by the fact that 1 Mr cent of the Stevenson voter ul 6nly 13 per cent of the Eisen lower voters think the other can didate might be almost as good The trend to Stevenson is furttie reflected by the answers to a que tion as to how long ago decisio was reached Makinr Deelsli Within OT 34 M Weeks A Stevenson Probable 106 Elihower Probable Voters 21 51 CRANDIC May Operate Buses DES MO1NES W The low Commerce Commission Saturda Rapids Iowa City Railway Co permissio to operate a bus line between th twocitiesandintermediate point The commissions decision dis posed of three cases In additio to approving the proposed bu line thev commission denied th application of the American Bu lies Inc of Lincoln Neb to e lend its present bus service be tween the two cities1 Alsocon plaints against service of the rai way company were dismissed AP PRISON GUARD CRACKS Biadley prison guard grabbed a shotgun and levelled it against riotous convicts in Ohio Penitentiary Friday night The guard flanked by a national guardsman other guards and officers fired from the front lawn ofthe prison toward the windows of cells in which prisoners were creating a disturbance after they had been returned to quarters v 2000 Convicts Riot Burn 8 Buildings in Ohio Prison No Mass Break Try COLUMBUS O thou and angryconvicts rioted for six iburs incenturyold Ohio Peniten iary Friday night before the upris ngvyas quelled uiTd i ng s went up in Furnishings and equipment were avagely beaten into wreckage A state highway patrolman mis aken for an escaping convict was wounded slightly on the head by a quickshooting guard No one else was injured no prisoner escaped no hostage was taken Milling Convicts Milling convicts spurred to auger by the needling of ring eaders threatened for a time to attempt a mass escape over the prisons 30foot wall Thirtyfive rim guards armed with sub machine guns stood their ground Somehow the escape attempt iJ t was in the convicts minds never jelled Quickly the state and city mar shaled forcespouring 250 guards and officers into the flaming prison compound Six hundredOhio Na ional Guardsmen rounded up from Central and Southern Ohio Order Restored By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS CHESTER IllOrder returned to Menard State Penitentiary where an ultimatum directed by Gov Adlai E Stevenson brokeup a mutiny of 339 convicts Friday SALEM 29hour hunger strike by 16 hardened convicts in the state penitentiary ended Fri day night after prison officials threatened to use force to restore order mobilized before the sudden col lapse of the revolt Possibly 100 diehards lingered in the courtyard after the mutiny hai fallen apart eventually forcinj guards to bomb them out wit tear gas Primed by Series The outbreak primed by a serie of other uprisings in prisons acros the nationj began in the mess hal at dinner time Like a flash fire the mutiny spread until it involvec nearly onehalf theprisons 4000 odd population iThefirst act ofthe Halloween drama was brief Eight hundrec of the original 2000 convicts quick ly agreed to returnto their cells TOat left 1200 Giiairdi thought th back of the rebellion staged fi food the cbhvicts callec had been broken Just as quickly the second ac started an uncontrolledriot 1200 convicts in the face of a tota guard force of 35 Fireafter fir broke out destroying five building r4he commissary the Catholi chapfel the laundry the personnel building the prison hospital Some of Better Boys Tried to Save Catholic Chapel COLUMBUS Ill help you straighten out the chapel father said one convict Yeah Im a good worker another It was more than eight hours after tbetiot that if ought an esti mated million dollars in damage to Ohio Penitentiary Friday night The father Rev C Valerian Lucier Catholic chaplain at thef prison stood beside the handful some of the boys dragged out of his cha no f reply to the offer of help in clearing up the chapelv he turned and stared at his church as firemen stood by unable to do anything about the blaze that devoured it Finally the priest who had stayed among the prisoners in the even at the height of the turned and saidf You know some of the better boys actually tried to savemy chapel Dinsdale Youth 79 Shot While Observing Halloween By THE WIRE SERVICES The Halloween toll thisyear Some tragedy and sorrow a lot of soaped windows squads of weary police and firemen several upended out louses and a great deal of harmless merrymaking and ess wandering by carrying youngsters At Reinbeck Ja James Dins dale 19 of near Dinsdale was shci y a Reinbeck night watqhmah Friday night while he and six oth er youths were celebrating Hal Constable George Hildebrend said Dinsdale son of Mr and Mrs Lester Dinsdaie was shot uhder Jie left arm by Henry Bern Dins dale was taken to a Waterloo hos pital The constable said the youths were dumping bales of hay from Dinsdales truck on the streets in downtown Reinbeck Hildebrend said he and Bern attempted to halt the truck and when Dinsdale didnt stop Bern fired at the ve hicle In many cities all police and fire department leaves were1 cancelled and the only officers not on duty were the skeleton staffs that re ported to work Saturday motning All About The Weather Mason City Partly cloudy and mild Saturday night Sunday cloudy and turning cooler cloudy Saturday an Sunday A little warmer south east Saturday night Minnesota Rain over most o northeast Sat urd a y night Sunday partly cloudy GlobeGazette weather data up to 8 am Saturday Maximiim 71 Minimum 30 AtSarB 4s YEARAGO Maximum 33 Minimum 16 18 Patients Perish in Fire HILLSBORO Mo elderly patients died Friday night as fire roared through a three story nursing home here Most of the dead weretrapped on the third floor Uie stone structure Other bodies were found a floor below A nurse first discovered ilaze about pm assparks and smoke came from a ceiling ft Jie first floor between the maaV juilding and an annexl The fire spread quickly up stair ways and alongcorriaore as alien dants tried to getthe 85 residents several of them invalids out of the building Hilisboro Fire Chief Richard King said the blaze apparently begah in a mens Wash room on the first floor He made no estimate on the main building which he called a total loss Fire Trucks Hit w One Fireman Dies SIOUX CITY collision o two fire trucksanda cat in town SiouxCity killedone fireman and injured eight other persons dui ing the late afternoon rush hour Friday The fire trucks approaching a street blaze from opposite direc tions crashed with such violence that blow torches were needed to release some of the who were trapped in the wnekage v I Fire Ltoden JuUed 2 3 Mmntsoto IOWO i i lr 12 3 4 FINAL Purdue Mich State I 2 3 FINAL Notre Dome 1 2 3 4 FINAL Michigan lii Illinois Penn Penn State   

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