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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: September 8, 1951 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - September 8, 1951, Mason City, Iowa                                lowof Doily MASON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE TMI NIWSPAMlt THAT MAKIS Alt N 0 HTM I 0 W A NS N 11 CM 10 HOME EDITION MASON CITY FALL OPENING DAYS September 7 to 14 VOL Lyn tot United Prat Full Lcuc Wttw Kve CenU m Copy MASON CITY IOWA SATlUDAY SEFTEMBEK I This Paper Consists at Two One Senate Unit Okays Secret Arms Bill J Added Funds Earmafkefd for Planes By EDWIN B HAAKINSON Washington fP The senate appropriations committee gave unanimousapproval Friday military money bill which members said provides for secret new weapons more ter rible than the atom bomb The senate committee increased by the amount vot ed by the house The added funds were earmarked for force ex pansion with a recommendation that the air force be built up to at least 95 groups Calif foe Action Senate Democratic Leader Mc Farland DAriz told senators he wpuld call the bill up for senate action Monday Senator OMahoney DWyo said some of the funds would go for the new secret weapons He added that if Russia launched a new world war she would be crushed in the same manner that Adolf Hitler and the German na zis were defeated during the last war i Thebig committee increasefor air power would go to the navy and airforce for plans they have not even submitted in detail to the congress Closeddoor testimony made public after it had been censored in many places disclosed that pentagon leaders had plannedto ask extra billions later probably in October OMahoney told reporters that every scrap of testimony about the new secret weapons had been deleted from the 1910 pages of closeddoor testimony made pub lic by the committee Young1 Talks There were some surprises how ever Senator Young RN Dak first committeeman to confirm President Trumans recent state ment about fantastic new wea pons was quoted as asking this of air force leaders v not guided missiles pret in large measure the use of planes for protection of the United States If so should we not have additional contract authority to produce guided missiles LL Gen C B Stone deputy chief of staff of the air force re plied They are included in that phase of the program sir The term guided missiles ap plies to a long list of shells rock ets projectiles and even pilotless planes that can be controlled or directed to hit targets The terrify ing buzzbombs showered on Eng land by Germans during World war 11 were in this class Senator Ferguson RMich at the closed hearings asked air force leaders when they would have enough modern new aircraft to defend America and to pros ecute ah aggressive effective war against the heart of what we see as our enemy today which wotQd be Russia Some air force officers replied that this goal mightbe reached by the end of next year or 1953 at the latest However others said this estimate applied only to the planes that trained men bases and other factors must be consid ered Would Hike Postal Rate to 4 Cents May Outlaw Penny Postcard By JOHN CHADWICK Washington cost of sending a letter would go tip from 3 to 4 cents under a postal rate increase bill passed bythe senate Friday night to the house The measure also would make the penny postcard only a mem ory raise airmail rates and boosl charges on other types of mail in an effort to swell the postoffice departments revenue a r o u n 3 a year Even so the department would be left in the red Its expenses now outrun its income more than annually Wrangle And it was only becausethe senate wrangled so long over the rate increase bill that it failed to hike the pay of postal workers slightly more than year Senators had hoped to whip through an 88 per cent salary in crease for postal employes Friday but at the end of Friday nights session Leader McFar landof Arizona said it now would have to wait until other toppri ority legislation is out of the way Despite a drawnout debate the senate in the end made only one change in the postal rate increases recommended by its postoffice committee By a vote of 36 lo 24 itadopted an amendment of Senator Long DLa making a 60 per cent in crease in the postal rates for maga zines over a 3year period 6 Million More The increase would be 20 per cent a year instead of the three 10 per cent increases proposed by the committee Staff members of the committee estimated the ef fect moneywise wouldbe to bring in an additional a year when thefull 60 per cent increase tookjhold Long offered the amendment after Senator Douglas DHL was defeated 32 to 2JL in an effort to boost the rates on both news papers and magazines 60 per cent instead of 30 per cent over 3 years At the end of 3 years when the higher rates on newspapers and magazines would be in full effect the committee estimated the postoffice department would realize about injaddi tional revenue The departments biggest yield would come from raising the rate on firstclass Csealed letters from 3 to 4 cents The change would bring in anestimated The tipping of the charge on postcards from one totwo cents was expected to add to postal revenues VOTES AGAINST IT Washington Guy M Giilstte DIowa Friday voted against a motion by Senator Lang er Ni to reconsider senate refusal to order restoration of twoaday mail deliveries in res identical areas The vote was 46 17 against the motion RedsShake Up Czech Chiefs London Czechoslovakias government was completely re organized Saturday following the purge of the Stalinist leadership of the Czech communist party Prague radio broadcast an an nouncement of the official Czech news agency reporting the gov ernment reorganization and the creation of a superministry to control all branches of the admin istration Fridays shakeup of the com munist party was interpreted as a victory for nationalist ele ments over the partys kremlin supporters AP A RUSSIAN Andrei Gromyko pre ceded byfellow S A Golunsky leaves his seat in San Franciscosopera house Friday night in what most people thought was another one of those Russian walk outs But Gromyko his aides and the Czech and Polish delegations almost immediately walked back into the au ditorium and took their seats at the Japanesepeace treaty conference Some believed the walkout was a put up job The grins of returning Russians lent credence to that R M Hall Named to District Farm Loan Advisory Council R M Hall prominent Clear Lake farmer and president of the North Central Iowa Farm Loan association elected totne dis tricts 8man awisory council Four states Iowa Nebraska South Dakota and Wyoming com prise the district Hall received the honor at a meeting at Storm Lake of all directors and secretary treasurers of National Farm Loans associations in northern and west em Iowa The advisory committee aids the district farm credit board in super vision of activities of the federa land bank the production credit association the bank for coop eratives and the intermediate credit bank according to W F Wahrersecretarytreasurer of the North Central Iowa Farm Loan as sociation Meetings are held at Omaha Nebr Halls election to the districi council denoted recognition of his contributions to farm people in the field of finance it was pointed out Under his chairmanship the North Iowa association has become the second in size among the nations OO cooperative farm loan asso ciations One of the foremost leaders in he farm cooperative movement Hall also has served as president of the Cerro Gordo county Farm Bureau president of the Feder ated Farm organizations of the county president of the rural elec xificatiqn association of the coun y and in various other positions of farm leadership He is also president of the HamiltonStory county association Other directors serving with Mr Hall on the board of the North Central association areRobert J Brown Rockford W A Alitz Manly Ed M Folkerts Rudd and Elling M Torblaa St Ansgar R M HALL AP Wirephoto PRELIMINARY MISS AMERICA PAGEANT WINNERS Five talent and bathing suit division winners in the annual Miss America pageant pose Friday night before the finals Saturday night when Miss Americawill be crowned Friday nights talent win ner was Miss North Carolina Lu Long Ogburn who was a previous bathing suit win ner while bathing suit honors Friday night went to Miss Arkansas Charlotte R Sim men Other winners from left were Miss Alabama talent Miss Jeanne Moody Miss South Dakota bathing suit Miss Marlene Margaret Rieb and Miss Utah talent Miss Colleen Kay Hutchins 19MonthOld Boy Killed by Tractor lattle Cedar RofaertEarl Doane 19month old only son of Mr and Mrs Jack Doane of Little Cedar was killed instantly when le was crushed by a tractor near here Friday afternoon He had been i playing in a fenced n yard at the home of his grand parents Mr and Mrs Fred Weber and escaped from the enclosure 3is grandfather started the tractor and ran over the youth The boy was taken to an Osage hospital but t was found that he had been Killed instantly Dr R L Whitley of Osage Mitchell county coroner found hat death was due to multiple ractures of the skull neck and lip and that it was accidental There will be no inquest Funeral services will be held Sunday at the Champion funeral home at Osage the Rev Roliin Oswald pastor of the Methodist church in Little Cedar officiating Pick Rodeo Queen Now They Cant Find Her Redding Cal UR Shasta county fair officials have picked the best cow girl in the parade that opened their they dont know who she is None of the judges could re member her first name but her last name was Smith There are 51 Smiths in the phone book SAME 38S Dlack tlar means traffic death putt 21 hoara ID Allies Okay Jap Pact as Russia Takes Walk Sen Jenner Complains of Life Photo Washington woman pho tographers pictures of an air force plane have raised a dispute be rween Senator Jenner andLife magazine Jenner saidFriday he has writ ten Secretary of Defense Marshall hat permitting Margarett Bourke White to photograph a top se cret plane apparently amounts to one of the most serious breaches of military security The letter made public by Jen ners office added that Miss BourkeWhite a member of Lifes photographic staff has been cited the house unAmerican activi ies committee as a member of subversiveV organizations In New York Life magazine said the photographer never was a member of the communist party nor of any of the designated groups to which her name has been publicly linked for more than 10 rears It added Life has full confidence in her oyalty When she photographed he activities of the strategic air command lifes confidence in her was endorsed by government curity channels which cleared her or the assignment The air force las said that she did not have ac cess to anyinformation materials and facilities not made available o other correspondents Jenner told Marshall an article in the magazine contains photo praphs of the B36 which has re cently been reconstructed to carry he atom bomb and of the B47 which is top secret He asked Marshall to supply the name and rank of persons in your department who helped in letting clearance for Miss Bourke White to ride in and photograph our B4TsJlHe also asked how many pictures she took where the plates are now Bow many prints have been made and who handled them at every step I should also like to know what precautions have been taken to prevent another such episode1 the senator wrote Reds May Be Willing to Change Truce Site Tokyo propaganda broadcasts Saturday night hinted that the reds may be willing to change the site of ceasefire talks from Kaesong as proposed by Gen Matthew B Ridgway The remarks were unofficial and did not say the reds accepted the supreme allied commanders proposal The talks have been suspended since Aug 23 First Hint The first hint came from the North Korean red radio at Pyong yang It urged the Korean people to be cautious about changing Later Peiping radio quoted a communist correspondent as say ing wnerever the talks are held nothing will come of them unless the Americans are willing to agree to the armistice on the lines pro posed by Russias Jacob Malik Presumably he was referring to the 38th parallel where the reds want the buffer line drawn The UN wants the buffer zone gen erally along present battle lines No Handicap A highranking officer in allied headquarters said a major com munist offensive in Korea would not endanger the talks We have been hammering them communists all along witn ourplanes he said We made it clear to the reds when the ar mistice talksstarted that we didnt intend to stop during the meetings Theres no reason they shouldnt stage an offensive it they want to I think well clobber them if they do Unarmed Yank Shot by Reds Berlin Germany IMS U S army authorities announced Sat urday an unarmed American sol dier shot by communist police haa died in a soviet hospital and ac tion would be taken after a com plete investigation The bodyof the soldier stfll un identified was handed back to American authorities Saturday morning He died Friday at the Russian military hospital in Pots dam a Berlin suburb An army announcement saic the investigation to date confirmed an eyewitness report that there was no provocation on the part of he soldier to justify the use of Srearms It said the soldier was definitely unarmed The soldier was wounded and sejbzed by East German commu list police Thursday night after his automobile crashed into a bar v AP Wirephoto FIRST SIGNATURE TO Republics Hipolito Jesus Paz ambassador to t h e United States signs the Japanese peace treaty in San Erancisco Satur day His was the first signaturewith nationsbeing called alphabetically Standing at the right isHugh D Farlev the conferences technical secretary UN Jets Fight Enemy Craft at 36000 Feel iUi LLUU O j rier at a communist checkpoint on mng batUe Saturday at heightsup 35000 feet over northwest Ko he citys eastwest border IOTVAN ELECTED Miami Beach Fla Sherman of Des Moines Friday was elected to the grand counci of Phi Epsilon Pi All About The Weather Mason City Partly cloudy Satur day night and Sunday Warmer Saturday night and Sunday Low Saturday night 53 High Sunday 78 Iowa Partly cloudy Saturday night and Sunday with scatter ec showers over the west portion late Saturday night or Sunday Warmer east and central Satur day night east portion Sunday Low Saturday night 52 to 57 east 60 to 65 west High temper atures Sunday 78 to 82 Souther ly winds 15 to 20 m p h Sun day Further outlook Monday and Tuesday partly cloudy with a few scattered showers turning cooler Tuesday Minnesota cloudi ness and scattered showers Sat urday night and Sunday Warm U S 8th Army Headquarters Korea Communisttroops and tanks Saturday nifht were reported in site of the suspended Korean truce talks as Chinese reds stepped up prob ing ground attacks on the west ern and central fronts By JOHX 8th Army Headquarters Korea red and 25 United Nations jets fought a run rea UN flaredropping planes Friday night spotted and attacked the 3rd group of communist tanks seen in 3 days Allied infantry outposts in west and central Korea dug in after shooting their way out of 4 red traps Thursday and Friday Many Theories That these accelerating actions portended still was a guess There were leading theories 1 The reds in the all score for the first week of Sep tember to more than 4000 j Other raiders knocked out important bridge alongthe reds1 vital eastcoast rail and highway supply line for nearly 200 miles between Wonsan andSongjin Aground the action subsided markedly Saturday after the red flareups of Thursday and Friday in the west The breakoff was so abrupt that an allied officer said it is al most too quiet important battle sector north of ped slightly since Friday and its bent on reoccupying course has swung in an arc away the nomansland which has sepfrom the U S mainland arated the main forces during a lengthy lull 2 The reds were probing and jockeving for position before launching a new major offensive Saturdays jet battle 20 miles north of Sinanju produced lots of flashing action But there was no report of damage to either side For 25 minutes 25 U S F86 Sabres and 40 Russianbuilt Mig 15s made firing passes at each other The successful allied air tank hunt was south of Wonsan on the east Korean coast Marine Cor ujuoj rtuu j er cast Saturday night Low airs discovered the armored group by the light of flares near Singo san 20 miles below Wonsan The flyers destroyed one tank and damaged two with a rocket at tack Hit 800 Vehicles It was part of an intensive al lied air effort to disrupt any move the reds may have in mind Friday allied landbased planes knocked out 800 red vehicles running their Saturday night 5055 northwest 5560 southwest high Sunday 7075 north 7580 south GlobeGazette weather data up o 8 a m Saturday Sept 8 Maximum 72 Minimum 54 At 8 a m 60 i Year Ago j Maximum 80 Minimum 41 i Bermuda Set for Hurricane Miami Fla giant hurri cane with a ship locked in the grip of its 150mileanhour winds bore down on the Honeymoon island of Bermuda Saturday and was expected to hit late Satur day night The force of the storm has drop The hurricane was located 80C miles east of Melbourne Fla and 300 miles south southeast of Ber muda at a m CST The Miami weather bureau said it was moving northward at 10 to 11 miles an hour with a tendency to curve to northnortheast with a slow increase in forward speed Charged With Drunken Driving Man Beats Doc of TicTacToe Bath Ens UR George T Franklin 40 charged with drunk enness beat an examining doctor at a game of tictactoe designed as a sobriety test The doctor still was not con vinced He told the court he con sidered Franklin intoxicated Why did I beat you at tictac toe then Franklin asked Because you started first the doctor replied The charges were dismissed U S Agree on Military Satellites in Boycott By JOHN MHIGHTOWER San Francisco allied powers of World war II Saturday signed a soft peace treaty with Japan Russia andtwo satel lites boycotted the signing cere mony In a ritual triumphantly cli maxing an American policy to end the Pacific war despite Russian objections Japanese P r em i er Shigeru Yoshida put his name to the treaty at a m Pacific daylight time v Last to Situ Japan was the last of the1 49 countries to signTheceremony Had taken 63 minutes beginning With Argentinas signing j It followed 3days of intensive debate here during which Gromy ko and his Czech and Polish col leagues had branded the treaty a pact for a new war in the far east The signingofthe pactdoes not necessarily mean thatrt will become effective Next it must be ratified by a majority of the chief Pacific na tions includingthe United States and Japan In this country that means approval by the senate which is not expected until early next year As the names began to go down on the peace treatymembers of the American delegationsaid that a security pact between United States Japan woufil be signed later meeting the peace pact this will specifically authorize tfie United States to keep troops in Japanin definitely Last Ditch Argentine Ambassador Hippo lito Jesus Pazj envoy toWasfing ton was the first ta march up to the table in San Franciscos opera house and of his country put his name to the trea Just 12 hours before the same gilt and marbte hall had been the sceneofa stand by Gromyko against the treaty which will grant Japan a soft peaceto end World1 warH Prior to the startofSaturdays signing ceremony Gromyko held a he stuck to his theme that th6 treaty is a draft for a new warT 1 Gromyko read a ed reporters questions until llrlO a m CST only on insistence of correspondents who dashedbnext door to the San Francisco Opera housa where the treaty meetingbegan r The Russian polish andfCzech oslovakian delegations were not on hand for the signing but the other 49 nations were GromykoTs lastchance blast at the treaty he had so vainly at tacked for the past 3 days con tained little new except a state ment that Russia herself from it Question Answered Asked if he saw in it the seeds of war between the Soviet Union and theUnited States Gromyko replied I have already answered that question He then repeated his old refrain the treaty sponsored by Britain and Swas not a treaty of peace but was prepara tion for a new war in east The US he contended would juse Japan for staging troops Gromyko attacked the treatys author John Foster Dulles as a seasoned warmonger To the 300 newsmen present the arguments which Gromyko read rapidly in Englishhad a familiar ring They were the same he had hurled at the conference Only his phrasing was raort embittered and direct What was possibly Gromykos last fling followed his defeat Fri day night in a freeforall con ference debate in which he went down shouting the diplomatic version of we wuz robbed Only two countries satellites Czechoslovakia and with the U S S R Japan Accepts The climax came Friday night after Japans premier accepted pact on behalf of the defeated na tion Grimvisaged Andrei Gromyko tried to revive a series of changes ae had proposed earlier These sought to limit Japans military power open the conference door o red China and close Japtn U S armed forces   

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