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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: July 4, 1951 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - July 4, 1951, Mason City, Iowa                                North Iowas Doily Newspaper Edited for MASON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE THt NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS N E I G H I 0 R S HOME EDITION VOL LVII Associated Pitu and United Frew Full Wlret Five CecU a Copy MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY JULY 4 1951 This Paper CcniiiU of Two Photos and Layout by Sorlien Prayers for Early Peace on July 4 Truman Speaks From Monument BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Hopes and prayers for an early peace mingled Wednesday with the nations 175th Independence day celebrations President Truman was sched uled to top the day with an ad dress from the Hillock in the iia tions capital where the 555foot obelisk memorial to George Wash ington is rooted The speech at p m CST to be televised and broadcast by radio CBS and filmed for newsreels and later television programs It was not known in advance whether the presidents speech would mention the anxious hopes that pending ceasefire talks in Korea would halt the yearold fighting 15 Hours Early The 4th of July came in Korea ISliours earlier than to the United States As it dawned there the UN command disclosed that only a few hours before allied 8th army units had won a bitter 3day bat tle for possession of a dominating hill 29 miles above parraQel38 Along the whole Korean front where many thousands of Ameri Clear Lake opened call troops fought an outpost deiits traditional 4th of July cele tt fense of independence there was heavy artillery action Half way around the world many more thousands of young GlobeGazette phcio by Sorlien ON WAY TO CLEAR LAKE Kelsey of Albert Lea Minn driv ing a 4cyUnder 1909 Velie passed through City Tuesday on his way to Clear Lake to celebrate the 4th of July Kelsey got a days start on many of the holiday trav elers although he say he cruises at 35 miles per hour and can go 55 miles per hour He purchased the car two years ago and spent 900 hours in rebuilding it Finalists for Talent Chosen Lake Celebrates bration Wednesday morning with Eldean Hdean ia 10 and Hobert Christian Forest to stage a program of band con certs street sports sailboat races Rodney Olson Northwood Ronald Sime Rake Lester and Goodell Donna K e r m i t Americans in uniform stood on and other activities guard in Europe against aggres The weather wasnt exactly sion another forward defense of what the committee ordered for the rights to life liberty and the day but the celebration went pursuit of happiness They markedon at schedule climaxed by the Terrv the day with parades evening talent show for whiA Claesgens and Jerry O A eill Clear At home the legal holiday temjcontestants were chosen Tuesday porarily stilled the clamor of injevening The grand finale on the dustry hammering out an arseuvater fronti one of the big events nal of defense against every is to be the nism The traditional banging of freworks fireworks was dimmed by lawsj following were named banning or restricting their use inTuesday night as finalists in the most places j talent show I Doublehcaders Chosen Finalists Pageants picnics speeches snoj John Adams Jr Nora Springs doubleheaderbaseoall games werej pianist Barbara Bonor Omaha the das fare from one end to the Ncbr dancer juni0r Kalke and Tom Huifstettler Rockford accordion and guitar duo La Lake Hilton Mason City was master of ceremonies other of the nation Delegates from the original 13 states were on hand in Philadel phia to reenact the signing and vdnne Sime Rake alto saxaphon ist Allan Yeager Clear Lake cor proclamation of Thomas Jeffernctist Ray Hewitt Clear sons declaration to the world tnaJbaritone DeeArm Drier and How a new nation bent on xreedom a rd Jeffri e Ha ton bov and girl was to be reckoned with ta dancers Judith Gamble and Yepson Forest City twirl United States planned special 4thers of Julv ceremonies worked out by preiidential commission The Hampton Mason City theme is rededication by Amer Aorgenson Dave and Jim icans to the great basic principles Haugen Osage vocalists Tommy of the Declaration of IndepenjHmch and Larry Brown Mason j City tap dancers and Mary Beth Sartor Mason City tap and novel Gives Car a Tryout Driver Still Gone Charles trial ride in a used car from the Charles City Motor company lot has stretched into 24 hours Police Chief Henry DeBoest said late Tuesday The officer said a man appeared at the lot Monday about 1 p m and asked to try the car and drove away When he had not returned by 4 p m police were notified The car is a 1949 tudor Ford with license plates DeBoest said he had no description of the man who took the car About ty reader The first 6 named with Ron The WEATHER Iowa Fair Wednesday Thursday partly cloudy and warmer with local t h u n d c r s howcrs Low Wednesday night 5560 GlobeGazette deathcr data up to 8 a in Wednesday Maximum 81 Minimum 53 At 8 a m 54 Precipitation trace YEAR AGO Maximum R5 Minimum 53 Ashland Clear Lake and Lenore Nelson Nora Springs were heard in a radio program over KGLO Tuesday night Wednesday night the semi finalists will compete for prizes of and S25 and the other 9 will receive each This event will be held at the water front if thch weather is favorable and will be followed by a stupendous dis play of fireworks to complete the annual July 4 celebration Named SemiFinalists Other semifinalists wore Judith Gamble and Sharon Yepson Forest City baton twirlcrs Ron Ashland Clear Lake humorist Lenore Nelson Nora Springs ma rimba soloist C E Sheldon Ma json City minstrel actor Doug Tie nan Garner vocalist Rosemary Christenscn Clear Lake pianist Ronnie and Kathy Mack Garner tap dance team Lucille Bruchncr Janice Olscn Donna Ouvcrson and Barbar Nassctt Clear Lake Milk maid harmonica quartet and Dean Thompson Clear Lake vocalist Other entrants in the contest were Craig M and Gary Beck Constance Foster Mrs Phil Mc Kimm Norville Wallace Linda Lcc Mcinecko Joanne Nurse and Lornine and Lorcttn Holstad Ma son City Gnylord Algcr Phyllis Hiinselman Sharon Newell Henry Kaiser Rescues Bride Lake Tahoe Cal trialist Henry J Kaiser Tuesday rescued his bride of 3 months and two physicians after a boating mishap spilled them into the cold watersof Lake Tahoe Mrs Kaiser and the two physi cians Dr Sidney Garfield direc tor of the Kaisersponsored Per manente hospitals and Dr Cecil Cutting chief surgeon at Oakland Permanente were sailing in a Catamaran twinhulled sailboat The 40foot aluminum craft was capsized by a high wind Mrs Kaiser and the two physicians managed to climb upon the dere lict The industrialist ashore when the accident occurred raced out in a speedboat making the 5 mile trip in 7 minutes He took the chilled soaked trio aboard and brought them to safety Nobody was injured Boy and Father Killed on Road By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS A 12yearold boy and his fa ther were and 7 other per sons injured in two separate automobi Tuesday Dead were William L Howell about 45 of Albia and his son Tommy They were killed when Howell attempted to pass 3 cars during a rain storm on highway 34 west of Albia uid struck a loaded feed truck driven by Trenton Gladfcl tar of Moravia Gladfcltar suf fered minor hurts Six persons were injured in a twocar collision al the intersec tion of highways 9 and 22 two miles north of Siblcy Sheriff Lloyd Wilson said the accident occurred w h c n a car driven by John Henry of Cleve land Ohio collided with a car driven by Arthur Locrts of Ochc vcdan Soy McKinley Potato Case Still on Fire Des Moines if north central potato farmers vote to dis continue the current federal po tato marketing agreement the government probably will not drop its case against Harold McKinley St Ansgar potato farmer it was learned Wednesday Statehouse sources here indicat ed that McKinleys case would have to be settled either within the federal departmenfof agricul ture or the federal courts The gov ernment accuses McKinley of vio lating a potato marketing order set up in 1942 after a referendum The government has called for a new mail vote on whether the agreement shall be continued The votes are to be mailed to a produc tion and marketing administration official in Chicago July 9 through July 13 McKinley has been to court several times in the controversy with the government seeking a permanent injunction to prevent him from marketing potatoes which have not passed federal in spection The agreement says the potatoes must be of a certain grade before they can be shipped in in terstate commerce McKinley has charged that the agreement is unfair not only to Iowa farmers but also that it was put into effect against the will of the farmers He reportedly has been gathering affidavits to prove that farmers in Wisconsin voted against the agreement Records show that Iowa farm ers voted 20 to 1 against the agree ment in the last referendum A federal judge has ruled that no hearing on a permanent injunc tion against McKinley can be held until he has exhausted all appeals within the department of agricul ture According to reports C L Fitch Ames secretary of the Iowa State Vegetable Growers associa tion McKinley and his lawyers agreed that there will have to be a decision of some kind even if the forthcoming referendum froze out the agreement Fitch said it was agreed that the agriculture department can not simply drop the SAME lac mrm traffic death Communist Officials Agree to Talks Sunday Preliminary CeaseFire Parley Scheduled for RedHeld Kaesong APs Oatis Sentenced to 10 Years ByDAXLTJCE Frankfurt Germany sociated Press Correspondent Wil liam N Oatis was sentenced to 10 years in prison Wednesday by a communist court in1Czechoslo vakia for spying out state secrets and reporting slanders and lies Half of Oatis sentence can be remitted for good behavior the chief magistrate of the 5man court said and will be expellee from Czechoslovakia after leaving prison The chief magistrate said Oatis the first western newsman ever tried behind the iron curtain was spared from the death penalty be cause of his admission of guili and assistance in exposing the espionage activities of western diplomats and western news agen cies Called Sham Three Czech employes of the APs Prague office tried with Oatis also were judged guilty and sentenced to prison terms ranging from 16 to 20 years In New York the Associated Press termed the twoday trial a sham and a mockery of elemen tal justice and said the AP would continue by all means available to seek Oatis release from this cruel and unjust detention The AP statement said the By OLEN CLEMENTS Tokyo commanders agreed Wednesday night to ceasefire talks in Korea Sunday the United Nations command announced Gen Matthew B Ridgway UN commander had pro posed such a meeting for Thursday His spokesman said he saw no reason why Sunday would not be acceptable There was no change in the previously agreed next start al armistice talks at the an cient Korean capital of Kaesong near the 38th parallel Front Quiet As an unusual quiet covered the 100mile Korean battlefront the powerful U S army radio on Okmawa picked up an acceptance message from the lredKorean Pyongyang radio Tt said General Ridgway Commander of the United Na tions forces We have received your reply date July 4 We agree to send 3 liaison officers to Kaesong as you proposed We willprepare for the preliminary conference in the Kaesongarea if you agree to set the dateon July 8 II Sung supreme com mander of the Korean Peoples armed forces Pen Tehhuai commander of the Chinese volunteers The broadcast was made at 7 p m 3 am CST in the Ko rean language Reception was extremely poor It was not heard by stations in Japan which have been listening for the latest message in the slow radio negotiations between oppos ing commanders Ridgway made the first move last Saturday Kim and Pengac cepted Sunday night expressing Wednesday Krai who is also North Korean premier was ac companied by his foreign and propaganda ministers The broad cast said the purpose was to con gratulate the Chinese peoples volunteers on the heroic victor ies they have won American frontline dispatches said the Chinese completed with drawing from mountains in the iron triangle which they lost this week at an estimated cost of 1500 casualties Chinese movements behind the lines were watched constantly from the air This was the pri mary objective of 364 sorties flown by the 5th air force during the day although 50 fighters spent two hours strafing and bombing reds on the eastern front Bearded American doughboys on patrol duty celebrated the 4th by hurling grenades and ducking red sniper ire but generally there wasnt much doing on the ground jiAi iii ULtSJilU prosecutions evidence at the trial a willingness to meet any time showed only that Oatis was en gaged in the legitimate pursuit of newsgathering as free people un derstand it Rehearsed Throughout his testimony Oatis spoke in slow careful phrases pausing regularly for the benefit of interpreters as if he had been carefully rehearsed A similarly voiced confession to espionage by U S Businessman Robert A Vo geler in Hungary was obtained through systematic brutality and torture over a long period Vogeler Said later repudiating his admis sions after his release Oatis in a final statement Tues day night that was strongly remi niscent of previous confessions in communist trials said he was sorry he committed espionage and that he did it only because I listened to the wrong kind of orders from abroad and came un der the influence of the wrong kind ofpeople in Czechoslovakia In Washington state depart proposed a Thursday It is the between July 10 and 15 On Tues day Sidgway agreed to start cease fire talks on the 10th and preliminary session preliminary session which the red commanders would advance to Sunday War Continues Under Ridgways proposal each side would send 3 unarmed of ficers of rank no higher than colonel to Kaesong They would then work out details for the im portant session between higher representatives of the command ers at which the actual end of the shooting would be arranged The war will continue until this session is held It is to deal purely with mili U S Rocket Plane Hits 1200 MPH Los Angeles supersonic Hummingbird the navys Doug las Skyrocket has zoomed nearly 70000 feet into the stratosphere at a darkling speed of more than 1000 miles an hour The rocketpropelled craft tered all records for speed and altitude in a June 11 test the navy announced guardedly Tues day The exact figures were with held for security reasons but speed conjectures ran from 1200 to 1500 m p h The air forces Xl previous unofficial record holder zipped 1000 m p h to an altitude of 63000 feet At the controls of the needle nosed Skyrocket was veteran Douglas test pilot Bill Bridgeman MANCHURIA AP Wirephoto Capital Pyontyanr Kaidei Real Peace Move to Follow CeaseFire May Try to Settle Far East Issues By JACK BELL AND EDWAKD E Washington of ficials forecast Wednesday a pos sible armistice in Korea may followed by efforts to reach wider agreement of deepseated far east ern diff erehces between the United States and the soviet bloc These officials noted that from Peiping in particular have come veiled hints that the communists want to reopen such questions as a UN seat for red China and future status of Korea and For mosa j If the reds bring these issues up in the prospective talks atKaesong officials who may not named said Gen thew B Ridgway already has been instructed to refer them to Wash ington for consideration after the Korean fighting has been brought to an end No Packages The TIN allies were described as determined that the talks at song must be limited to military matters Their reported plan is to bar any package deal and con tinue fighting until formal armisi tice terms are agreed upon and put into effect Senator George DGa saidj tary this par34 He said the record was made ticular point has not been raised Jin level flight after he climbed lii T ucf ment press officer Lincoln White armistwe pending subsequent the radio exchanges between UN and red commanders Biggest problem appeared to be setting a demarcation line for the Tuesday termed the trial a hoax and said he hoped the American confession or relevation out of or otherwise obtained from anyone who is held incommuni cado for 70 days or more level negotiations at a higher The reds want the line drawn at the 38th parallel old line between North and the line to run farther through red Korea Polish Peace Train UN headquarters were all set for every stage of the military to polishing brass on a peace train now in Seoul 35 miles southeast of Kaesong Uji July 4 IsWedding Anniversary for Pair Moline 111 4th of July The U S 8th army announced holiday has been an extra specialjWednesday that press representa day for Mr and Mrs T H Blandjtivcs would not be permuted at ever since their marriage on JulyiKacsong during the preliminary j talks nor would newsmen be per ismittcd to question the officers onesent Names the officers have Kidd of not been announced They will go from Seoul by helicopter it the weather is good by jeep if it is bad There was no indication when Ridgway would reply to the latest message from Kim and Peng The Chinese reds Peiping radio reported Kim visited the front 4 years ago Blnnd a retired contractor daughter Mrs Charles Cedar Rapids Iowa IOWAN APPOINTED Miami Beach Fla S James of Des Moines Tuesday was reappointed secretarytreas iucr of the American Naturopathic asodation wide open to the desired altitude Bridgeman told reporters that the ship burst smoothly through the sonic speed of sound is 661 mph above 35000 handled easily during the 15minute flight over Ed wards air force base at Muroc Cal Death Toll Reaches 31 By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Accidental deaths started to mount early Wednesday as the nation began celebrating the July 4 Independence day holiday From 6 p m local time Tues day through mid morning Wednesday 31 accidental deaths meanwhile that if a Korean cease fire isnt followed by communist aggression elsewhere this country might consider reshaping its arms program George told a reporter he be lieves world developments might be such that the projected 3year program could be stretched out over 4 years with a consequent cut hi the annual rate of spending We have got to keep the mili tary program going but it may not be necessary to spend as much as has indicated the Georgia senator said A year from now we should know rather definitely whether the threat of world war has diminished Spending Cut If it has perhaps we could extend the program over another year and cut the level of spend ing John D Small chairman of the had been reported Of these 21 munitions board said it would be were killed in traffic accidents 3J incredible if the nation slowed drowned and 6 died from miscella neous causes One fireworks death was reported WASHINGTON SLIPPED MERE Chicago Washing ton was summoned into holiday court Wednesday charged with creating a disturbance its rearming program even it peace is restored inKorea W J McNeil assistant secre tary of defense testified that it the fighting stops congress wont have to be asked for from 000000 to in mili tary funds over those already re quested for the present   

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