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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: May 11, 1951 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - May 11, 1951, Mason City, Iowa                                North Doily Newspaper Edited fat MASON GITY GLOBEGAZETTE TMI MIWSPAMK THAT MAKlS ALL NORTH IOWANS MIlGMiOtV HOME EDITION TOL LVD Aiaoclated Press United Prcsi Full Wlr MASON CITY IOWA FftlDAV MAY 111951 Thli Paper ComlsU of Two No 1ft Extra Tax Voted on Liquors Gallon Barrel Levies Raised UR house ways and means committee voted tentatively Friday to impose extra taxes of on liquor beer and wines The new revenue would fall far below the asked by the administration from these sources Proposed hikes in excise taxes on automobiles gasoline radios and television sets refrigerators and other items will be taken up later The committee already has agreed tentatively to boost taxes on individuals and corporations by a year Per Gallon Raise The committee voted to raise the present per gallon tax on liquor to to produce an other in revenue each year The treasury had asked for a boost to a gallon to bring in more Under thecommittee proposal the tax on a 5th of 100 proo liquor would go up from tc The committee jumped bee taxes from a barrel to fo an additional The treasury wanted an increase tc for more in rev enue Taxes on wines were raised b the committee to provide an addi tional compared to th treasurys request for more About Half The committee did not go as far as Mr Truman recommended in voting individual and corpora tion boosts Similarly committee members said they probably woulc approve only about half of the excise tax increase the president asked Mr Truman proposed that the excise tax on passenger cars be in creased from the present 7 to 2C per cent The treasury estimated that such an increase would yield He asked congress to raise an estimated by increas ing the tax on liquor from to per gallon the tax on beer from to per barrel and by increasing the various taxes on wines Would Double Tax The gasoline tax under Mr Trumans recommendations would be doubled going up from one and onehalf cents to 3 cents a gallon Refrigerators television sets radios and other consumer durable goods would be taxed at 25 per cent instead of 10 per cent under the presidents proposal Cigaret taxes would be in creased from 7 cents to 10 cents per pack and cigars by various amounts As the committee prepared to start its work on excises there were indicates that the tentative decision to raise individual in come taxes a straight 3 percentage points in each bracket might be changed Under the tentative plan the 20 per cent tax on the first of taxable income would be in creased to 23 per cent The pres ent 22 per cent tax on taxable in come of S2000 to 54000 would be increased to 25 per cent and so on up the line John L Lewis Calls for End of Controls Washington L Lew Is has called for an end of all price and wage controls when the present defense act expires June 30 Lewis and the 25man executive board of his United Mine Work ers union Thursday approved a resolution in which they described the defense act as an iron collar on both business and labor Pres ident Truman has asked for a two year extension of the act The mine workers resolution said supporters of the act were advocating changes in the basic American way of life and seek ing by political blandishment to inveigle and lull this nation into false sense of economic secur ity STALKS PER ACRE Ames S Dyas Iowa State college extension agrono mist said Friday 12000 to 16000 stalks per acre will be required on most Iowa soils to produce high corn yields in 1951 SAME traffic death MSI 1 hours AP Wirephoto AMERICAN INFANTRYMEN TAKE COVER Infantrymen take cover on their stomachs along the south bank of a Korean river as tanks of a regimental combat team leave the road to avoid an enemy mine field Will Select Chicago for GOP Convention By JACK BELL Tulsa Okla Chicago all but finally chosen as the site of their 1952 presidential nominating convention republicans backed away Friday from any public indorse ment of Gen Douglas MacArthurs Korean war policies The G 0 P national committee still had to ratify a sub committees unanimous recommendation that party dele gates meet in Chicago the week of July 21 to pick their can didate Many republicans think the democratic candi date will be President Truman seeking his second elective term Ratification of the subcommit tees recommendation was consid ered a formality although Phila delphia adherents still were plan ning a contest Vote for Taft In this lastminute battle the Philadelphians were counting on an assertion that a vote lor Chi cago would be a vote to nominate Senator Robert A Taft of Ohio chairman of the senate republi can policy committee B Carroll Reese Tennessee national committeeman and a supporter of Taft was picked to report the subcommittees recom mendation to the national group It would be the latest republi can convention in liistory But democrats were expected to wait as they have except in 1856 and L888 for the republicans to do their picking first This year promised to be no exception with the democrats be ng forced into an August 20 convention start if they choose Chicago to make the convention arrangements cost less Some Philadelphia adherents remained confident they can woo the demo crats their way despite their ap jarent loss of the GOP conven ion Talk MacArthur While the nominating conven lon time and place was the prin pal business of the republican lational committees meeting the principal talk was about Mac Arthur and the political effect of lis meteoritic splash across Americas front pages Almost without exception the republicans who will have a large voice in naming the partys next presidential nominee adopted a vaitandsee attitude toward the deposed Pacific commander and lis proposals for stepping up the war against communist China For instance Werner W ichroeder Illinois national com mitteeman told reporters he hinks it would be wise to wait until the heats off before the decide whether they should endorse MacArthurs pro ram for a blockade of red China bombing of Manchurian bases and use of Chinese nationalist troops rom Formosa The republican party should not hitch itself to the MacArthur program at this time Schroeder Significant Since Illinois is regarded as one of Tafts possible strongholds this statement by Schroeder was con sidered significant Sinclair Weeks Massachusetts lational committeeman and one of the partys principal fund rais ers had the same sort of advice Weeks is not regarded as primar ly a Taft supporter although he s friendly to the Ohio senator Kansas supporters of Gen Dwight D Eisenhower for the OP nomination said they hope he argument over MacArthurs jolicies will not bring Eisenhower lome to enter an active dispute vith his 5star colleague Midwestern committeemen said he public sentiment for Mac Arthur follows that of congres ional in favor of lis those that want Siscnhower to become the nom nce dont want that segment of the public arrayed against him in advance Eisenhower has not indicated in any way that he would become a candidate but that has not stopped some democrats from proposing him for their partys nomination The majority of republicans here however seemed to feel that the man they will have to beat in 1952 is President Truman himself Despite their loss to the same candidate in 1948 the GOP com mittee members generally are confident that the next time they can take Mr Truman whoever their own nominee is Machula Gets 9 Months for Aiding Kitts Escape Cedar Rapids A former Linn county jail trusty has been sentenced to 9 months in a fed eral prison on a charge of aiding a federal prisoner to escape The trusty John G Machula 22 of Cedar Rapids pleaded guilty Thursday to helping Ken neth Kitts 33 of Omaha escape from the Linn county jail last Jan 22 Kitts later was apprehended in Omaha and convicted in connec tion with the robbery of a Laur ens bank At the time of Kitts escape Ma chula was serving a 30day sen tence for petty larceny and was working in the jail kitchen The government charged Machula gave Kitts the layout of the jail and told him which doors to go through to escape rAII About The WEATHER Mason City Fair and cool Friday night with low of 3236 Light frost Saturday increasing cloudiness and mild with high near 65 Showers Saturday night owa Fair and cool Friday night with scattered frost in favorable locations in east and central portions Low Friday night 32 36 northeast to 3540 southwest and extreme west Saturday mostly cloudy with showers by night Warmer south Saturday high around 70 Further out look Sunday showers and cool Monday partly cloudy and not so cool Cooler again by Wednesday Minnesota Mostly cloudy north Ray Mills Is President of Iowa Labor Couch Defeated by 25 Votes Cedar Rapids Mills Des Moines city councilman is the new president of the Iowa Federa tion of Labor He was elected Thursday to suc ceed A A Couch of Des Moines who has headed the state Ameri can Federation of Labor organiza tion for 14 years The vote was 287 for Mills and 262 for Couch Mills and other newlyelectec officers were sworn in immediate ly after the election committee re ported the results Other Officers Other officers elected were L Curtise Wood Cedar Rapids vice president John J Brown Du buque secretarytreasurer Fern Q At wood Waterloo Harry Mc Fall Des Moines James J Mur phy Sioux City and James E Lewis Burlington members of the executive board McFall Mur phy and Lewis were reelected Governor William S Beardsley told a convention session Thurs day night that to defeat commu nism we must make democracy so strong that the leaders behind the walls of the Kremlin will never challenge our leadership He declared Americans must keep the nations economy strong and be messengers of good will and practitioners of good will Urgred Modification The governor declared that he recommended to the 1951 legisla ture that the states labor laws sanning closed and union shops be modified but the legislature did not act on the recommenda tion It is important that we in the state take every step we can to improve conditions for wage earn ers Beardsley declared We are living a period when we must recognize that workers are en titled to security The 48yearold Mills takes over the presidents post at a new salary The convention voted Thursday prior to the election to increase the salarv from to Mills told the convention Im mighty proud to be the new president of the Iowa State Federation of Labor I will do my best for you and I hope you will sfive me your undivided sup port Couch plainly stunned by his defeat told the federation I have enjoyed my 14 years as president Your judgment and his tory will tell whether we have made progress in those years The womens auxiliary to the federation reelected Mrs Edith Beebe Clive president Mrs Gertrude Beck Council Bluffs vice president and Mrs Gwen McElroy Boone secretarytreas urer Mason City members of the American Federation who attended the convention in Cedar Rapids in cluded Tames Griebling letter car and fair south portion Friday ricrs G H Mitchell building night with scattered frost south east portion Cloudy and cooler north partly cloudy and turn ing cooler south portion Satur day Low Friday night 3038 High Saturday 50 extreme north to 70 extreme south Globe Gazette weather statis tics for the 24 hours ending at 8 a m May 11 Maximum Minimum At 8 a m Year Ago Maximum Minimum 58 36 52 G3 35 trades Mrs Herold Weigand ladies auxiliary Boyd Arnold fire fighters Herold Weigand motion picture propectionists Guy Roark teamsters Clyde Buffington car penters and Clyde Lindsay sugar beet refiners Arnold who is president of the Iowa Fire Fighters association ad dressed the convention VEHICLE TAX COUNT Des Moines state Fri day reported vehicle use tax col lections totaling dur ing March 1951 Hickenlooper Hits Marshall on Bombing WathliiKtwn Hick enlooper Friday in his questioning of Defense Secre tary Marshall that bombing north of the Yalu river in Korea was necessary from a military stand point Hickenlooper read from a maga zine article in which Geu Hoy Vandenberg chief of staff of the air force was quoted as saying airpower was rendered practical ly inoperative in Korea when the United Nations banned bombing north of the Yalu river in ai effort to avoid diplomatic rupture with the Chinese communists The Yalu is the boundary between Korea and Manchuria Decision Political The lowan said this showed bombing north of the Yalu wa necessary from a military point p view but was halted as a politi cal decision Marshall commented he pre sumed the article was written a the time Chinese communists firs entered the war last November He recalled he had testified the joint chiefs of staff at that time proposed to carry out hot pur of enemy planes across the Yalu in air and added he favored this verj emphatically But American allies in Korea did not favor this he said and by the time their views had been ob tained it was an academic matte because UN forces had retreatec 200 miles from the Manchurian border This meant the air force hac 200 miles in which to deal with them the communists and dea with supplies Marshall added Hickenlooper also pressed the point that the joint chiefs of staf had intended that their recom mendations contained in a Jan 12 document should become effective either when the UN forces evacu ated Korea or the situation be came stabilized He asked Marshall if the sit uation in Korea had not been sta bilized some time ago Not Stabilized Technically no the secretary replied because there has been considerable change in the situa tion since that time in the move ment of troops in the morale o the arrry which has a great dea to do with stabilization Marshall conceded it was a question of terminology But he said he had stated previously the Jan 12 document has not been disapproved it has not been vetoed there has been no specific action taken by any other mem aers of the government concernec o block the procedure because hey have gone over the chiefs oJ staff each phase of it and have seen satisfied with the decisions Hickenlooper said he wonderec why we would accept a calcu ated risk of provoking Russia to in Europe and why on the other hand we refuse to accept a similar calculated risk in the far east Hickenlooper alluded to the Ko reain war program advocated by MacArthur and rejected by the administration It calls for bomb ng red Chinas supply bases in Manchuria a naval and economic alockade of red China and re moval of restrictions on opera dons of the Chinese nationalis troops based on Formosa No Other Choice It was MacArthurs public urg ng of his program which led President Truman to recall him from his commands on April 11 In reply to Hickenlooper Mar shall said It was felt we had no choice on western Europe but to proceed as we did unless we al owed that region to go by de fault to communist domination He said the situation is nol comparable in Korea where we are in action and the question is whether we can extend that ac ion without developing an en larged war on the Chinese side or a full war because of the re actions of the Soviet Union Indonesia Intends to Help China Jakarta Indonesia Indo nesia said flatly Friday she in tends to continue selling rubber o any country including red can send her goods she badly needs The stand of this major rubber roducer a member of the Jnited Nations was expressed y Foreign Office Spokesman irim Zaino He added however hat Britains decision Thursday o ban rubber exports to com munist China probably will be discussed soon by the Indonesian abinet Last Monday Foreign Minister Achmad Soebardjo declared here hat Indonesia would sell to the evil if this would serve the peo iles interest In Singapore there were re ports Friday that the Singapore nd Malayan governments likely vill follow Britains action in placing an embargo on rubber ex orts to the communists in China UN Troops Advance on East Front Brace for Chinese on West NORTH KOREA v AP Wircplioto WHERE NEW RED BUILDUP THREATENS Open arrows show where reds are massing in an apparent new move broken arrows on Seoul capital of South Ko rea Other developments on the peninsula include ambush ing of a red patrol by UN forces near Chunchon Fulbright Dawson Clash on RFC Deals Washington Aide Donald S Dawson and Senator Fulbright DArk clashed sharply Friday over whether Dawson had usedhis white house prestige to influence government loans The tiff came at the end of a senate banking subcom mittees inquiry into the affairs of the reconstruction fi nance corporation the governments huge lending agency Leaving the witness chair after two days of testimony Dawson told reporters the hearing clearly demonstrate that there has been no im propriety on my part as the subcommittee charged Fulbright the subcommittee chairman commented that tha was only Dawsons opinion Different Slant Anyone can draw his own con clusions1 Fulbright said Theres quite a difference in views 01 what is proper and improper Earlier while the presidents patronage adviser was on th stand Fulbright told him that his denials of using political influ ence in RFC loans were a littli beyond my belief The subcommittee has namec Dawson as a member of an alleged influence ring which swayed th award of RFC loans Just before the hearing closed Senator Douglas DI11 tried tc 5et Dawson to admit that perhap le wielded pressure and wasn even aware of it Fulbright tried to make th same point that Dawson as th distributor of patronage was in such a spot he didnt need to ap ply pressure Whether you sought to do it whether you intended to do it you did influence them Fulbrigh said of RFC officials At the conclusion Fulbrigh said he feels the main purpose of he hearings has been accom a complete in vestigation of the RFC More Care He said he feels that in the fu ture more care will be used by government officials in trying to apply political pressure Douglas agreed In questioning Dawson Fill bright repeatedly stressed the jower that Dawsons white house josition appeared to give him You overemphasize my im Dortance Dawson said You are a very modest man Tulbright retorted with heavy sar casm He insisted that in the eyes of RFC directors whom the sub committee contends were subser ient to Dnwson you had the jower of life and death in the economic sense Marriage License Fee Is Doubled DCS Moines new state aw generally doubling the fees ollccted by county officials bc amc effective Friday The cost if a marriage license now goes rom to Under Iowa law legislative bills which are made effective before the usual July 4 date take effect the day after the last publication of the bill The fee measure was published for tho last time Thurs day by the Pomeroy Herald and the Ida County PioneerRecord at Ida Grove The secretary of slates office planned to put in the mail Fri day a letter and several copies each of the bill to nil county of ficials in all counties Retail Meat Cuts Slashed 12c a Pound Federal Order Effective Monday Washington The govern ment Friday cut the retail ceilini prices of some chuck steaks and pot roasts by about 12 cents a pound and of unboned rump roas by 5 to 6 cents a pound The office price stabilization took the action in a series of amendments to the beef price or ders An addition to the retail or ders puts a ceiling price of 50 to 57 cents a pound on beef tongues depending on the type and loca tion of a store These changes will be effective next Monday along with all of the other ceiling prices on retail cuts The changes in retail beef ceil ings provided in Fridays amend ments include Fixing a single price for chuck arm and chuck blade bone in steaks and pot roasts The action adds one cent a pound to the ceiling price of chuck blade At the same time it reduces arm chucks by about 12 cents a pound to the level of the new chuck blade price Arm chucks were about 13 cents a pound higher than chuck blades in the beef orders issued April 29 OPS said these changes are being made be cause the two cuts are not readily distinguishable by consumers A reduction of 5 to 6 cents a pound is being made in the ceil ng price of choice and good grade rump roasts bone in to bring it n line with the ceiling price of boneless rump Farmer Killed While Disking Near Rockford Allied Planes Hit Big Buildup By RUSSELL BRINES Tokyo United Nations troops shoved ahead 3 miles on the east Korean front Friday In the west they dug in to meet an expected red offensive South Koreans made the eastern advance north of parallel 38 They met only light opposition One in fantry company marched into Inje without firing a shot Elsewhere the front was quiet except for restlessprobing pa trols But there was continual movement back of communist lines 4 Pockets The reds were building up 4 sizable pockets for a possible two pronged drive on Seoul They ap peared to be massing in an arc north and northeast of the old South Korean capital Allied outposts got set to meet an assault They sandbagged their positions built booby traps and strung barbed wire On the other side of the nar rowing nomans land reds were moving up behind tank traps and minefields Automatic weapon fire turned back small allied patrols probing too close to suspected red strength Chinese moved down from the 38th parallel on the central front to join 1500 of their comrades sighted near Kapyong This area 32 miles northeast of Seoul had been a nomansland lor more than a week From 2 American officers be lief the reds strike at Seoul from two direc tions AP Correspondent Nate Polowetzky reported from t h e east central that allied of ficers said the reds might launch a diversionary attack at a 3rd point on the HwachonChunchon axis A red patrol on predawn re connaissance Friday was am bushed by UNtroops northeast of Chunchon Air observers re ported Chinese were in moderate strength in this area Farther east South Koreans sent long range patrols probing south of the Hwachon reserr voir At the eastern end of the line other South Koreans sought to stabilize their positions northof the 38th parallel There they drove reds fromdugin po sitions near Inje Thursday in a bayonet charge 700 Prisoners Along the entire battlefront about 1100 casualties were in flicted on the reds Thursday the 8th army reported Nearly 700 were taken prisoners twothirds of them in South Korea An American F80 Shooting Star jet was shot down over the front Thursday B29s bombed air strips at Sari won and Sinmak Friday on the red supply line to the western front from Pyongyang North Ko rean capital It was the 7th con secutive day of raids designed to thwart a possible red air offen sive North Korean air fields have oeen blasted by more than 1000 tons of bombs since this aerial campaign opened 20 days ago Biggest strike of this campaign by 312 planes Wednesday at Sin uiju in northwestern Korea des troyed at least 15 singleengine red planes caught on the ground air officers reported UN bombers began blasting the lew Chinese concentration near Kapyong on the central front Thursday night and continued friday Attacking planes roared through unusually heavy anti aircraft fire Every plane was fired on Com nunists even shot at unarmed ob server planes which they usually gnored to conserve ammunition A Chines patrol reconnoiter T i r TI i T utuiui Actuuuuiltri nockfordJake Pnulus Jr m ing south of Kapvong early in the his late 30s was instant y klledldav fought blicfry with a UN out n i TTTminv annirinnt f MIC fi n a tractor accident on his farm 5 miles northeast of Rockford at 9 a m Friday Mr Paulus was disking in a ielcl when the disk became stuck he tractor tipping over backwards on to him Survivors include the widow a on a daughter and 3 stepchil dren Funeral arrangements were not ompleted Friday afternoon FUMGENERAL NOW Washington now Gen Matthew B Ridgway The senate ate Thursday confirmed Ridg vays promotion from lieutenant encral post Red strength in the center in dicated the Chinese had been able to shift from the western front despite allied air cover Ac tion in the west tended to con firm this AP Correspondent George A McArthur reported ANOTHER EARTHQUAKE San Salvador El Salvador F Salvador felt a 30minute earthquake Thursday night but the communications office after quick calls to the 14 departmenti of the alreadybattered country said no damage was reported   

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