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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: April 21, 1951 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - April 21, 1951, Mason City, Iowa                                North Iowas Doily Newspaper Edited ioc UM CITY GLOBEGAZETTE EDITION THI NIWJPAFtfc THAT MAKES ALi NORTH IOWANS VOL LV1I Associated Pros and United Full Lease CtnU Copy1 MASON Cm IOWA SATURDAY AFKIL 21 1951 1avwr ot Two Oaf Serious Floods Hit Thousands in River Towns By THE ASSOCIATED PKESS The mighty Mississippi on a spring rampage in the up per valley area Saturday threatened serious floods to river towns in 3 midwest states Old Man by rains and heavy runoffs spilled out over midwest lowlands and forced thousands to flee their homes The Red Cross estimated more than 3000 per sons have been evacuatedin the floodstricken area Other hundreds were threatened with evacuation over the weekend or early next week A state of emergency has been declared in some Iowa communi ties as the big streams crest inched to near record levels There was teverish activity in jome of the cities along the river southward from Wisconsin into Iowa and Illinois Levees were being strengthened Bulldozers put into operation in building earthen dikes Showers Predicted The Red Cross national guard and civil defense agencies joined in caring for flood victims and preparing to combat what might be the highest floodwaters in years Cooler weather with showers waspredicted for most of the llbodstricken area Saturday There appeared no immediate danger of serious flooding in the Mississippi Cairo III valley below Two national guard units were sent to Muscatine after a state of emergency was declared for the City of 20000 which is in danger cf serious flooding From 500 to 600 residents in Muscatine were urged by Sheriff Charles Ansdn to evacuate or beready toleavVtheir homes on an hours notice The sheriff said the homes in a mixed indus trial and residential section were endangered by seepage or a pos sible levee break further down itream Foot of Top The diief danger spot in the Muscatine area is at Port Louisa 15 miles south of Muscatine Water waswithin afoot of the top of the dike which protects Port Louisa pumping station Sheriff Robert Lewis of Louisa county said he feared the dike could not withstand the pressure of the 215 loot crest predicted for April 26 If the dike breaks Lewis said water might back up as far as The Red Cross said about 300 families have been evacuated from lowland homes in the Dubuque urea where the Mississippi reached a record level of above 22 feet The old record was 217 feet in 1880 Rails Under Water Most railroad yards in Dubuque were under water Although rail traffic still was moving it was feared all trains will be halted be fore the expected crest of 235 feet is reached probably Sunday In East Dubuque 111 some 400 families have been removed from Budapest Hungary The Hungarian government has agreed release Robert E Vogeler American businessman held in prison here on charges of espio nage A brief communique from the Hungarian foreign ministery said merely that negotiations between he Hungarian government and he U S legation here were suc cessful A spokesman for the foreign ministry declined to say whether Vogeler has been released or still s in prison Vogeler now 39 was sentenced to 15 years imprisonment by a Hungarian court on Feb 21 1950 after having been arrested in charges of after having been November 1949 on being a spy He was in Hungary as assistant vice president and central European representative of International Telephone and Tele graph company Arrested with him was Edgar Sanders a Briton with the same firm Sanders also was accused of spying and got a 13year sentence Both confessed in court About 600 persons have been Hungarians Agree to Free Robert Vogeler U S Negotiations Prove Successful forced to leave their homes in Prairie Du Chien Wis where a 3rd of the city of 5000 is under water The river was expected to crest Saturday at 214 feet 34 feet above flood stage River traffic in the Hock Island 111 area was hit The U S en gineers office said 7 of 12 locks in the district have been or will be closed and the electric motors re moved from the gates to prevent their being damaged Workers in west Rock Islanc factories carried out equipment and supplies and moved machin ery to higher floors Thousands of sandbags were used to reinforce a railroad embankment which sur rounds the city and which can terve as a temporary floodwall Similar preparations were being made in nearby East Moline 111 Campbells Island Lcvec Wont Hold Mayor George Ulmer of Sabula Iowa expressed belief that the 5 000fbot long levee protecting the community of 800 would not hold A break of the levee would put the town under 12 feet of water In nearby Clinton many industrial plants were forced to close or pre pared to shut down The Mississippi continued to Inch downward at Winona Minn the hardest hit by the floods in southeastern Minnesota But a heavy rain over the state Friday dampened the hopes of flood refu gees of an early return to their homes Floodwaters from the Mis sissippi and Minnesota rivers forced more than 5000 persons from their homes in the last two weeks Hold Last Services yandenberg Grand Rapids Mich meek gathered with the mighty here Saturday for the funeral of worldrenowned Sen Arthur H Vandenberg Last rites for the famed bi partisan foreign policy advocate of the republican party brought together the man in top hat and muscled factory worker Trains and planesbrought offi cial delegations from the capitol at Washington Neighbors Join Vandenbergs neighbors and fel low citizens the oldest of whom knew him as the harness makers joined in a huge and solemn tribute Funeral services were set for 1 p m CST at the Park Con gregational church The church with capacityfor 1000 installed a loudspeaker in the basement to carry the Rev Edward Archi bald Thompsons sermon to an other 500 mourners Senator Vandenberg who servec in congress more than a score o years died Wednesday night after a long illness He was 67 The senators body lay in state in the church chapel Saturday morning Meanwhile his native Michigan began a 48 hour period of official mourning At HalfStaff Flags all the way across the Say General Offered Best Men for Europe at Wake Island Talk Soys Administration Throws Smoke Screen Washington W Hickenlooper RIowa ac cused the administration the issue of whether the high command ever shared Gen Douglas MacArthurs military views on the Korean war Senator Long DLa replied that MacArthur had lost one gamble when the Chinese communists entered the war md President Truman was only preventing the deposed Pa ific commander from taking the final gamble that Russia vould not come in if we bomb China Hickenlooper is a senate foreign relations committee nember Long is a member of the armed services group AP Wircplioto INDUSTRIAL AREA Mississippi lowland industri al area reaching the outskirts of the business district upper left Saturday MacArthur Rests Son Sees Giants if D QUIGG New Gen Douglas MacArthur planned to rest Satur day to recover from one of the most strenuous engagements in his 51 years as a military man That engagement was the rec ordbreaking reception tendered him Friday by New York Cityat the end of which the weary gen eral told his admirers You have forced us to capitulate At long last we do surrender Tentative plans for the 71 year old general to attend a major league baseball game Saturday By DeWITT MacKENZIE AP Foreign Affairs Analyst The global surge of favorable and adverse criticism directed at Jeneral MacArthurs speech be fore the joint houses of congress las much to say about the emo ional aspects of his oratory The address course lighly emotional in places as was fully demonstrated by the reaction on his hearers Tor instance there vere tears and even open sob bing in the chamber when Mac Arthur concluded with his old soldiers never die they just fade away And listeners on the radio state flew at halfstaff Gov G Mennen Williams a democrat asked the people to give thought o the achievements of this great American Large delegations were due in from Washington A presidential group included Vice President Alben W Barkley Secretary of StateDean Acheson Secretary of Commerce Charles Sawyer and W Averell Harriman special presidential adviser on foreign affairs President Truman was not able to attend On the eve of the funeral Sen Vandenbergs son Arthur H Jr disclosed he was considering pub lication of his fathers memoirs He said his father never seemed to find the time Report Retain Is Sinking lie DYcu France Marshal HenriPhilippe Petain is unconscious and sinking slowly his stepson said Saturday night visiting the dying soldier in his fortress prison Petains stepson Pierre de Herain denied published reports that the 94year old marshal died afternoon ACCEPT LIQUOR BIDS Duluth Minn UR of ficials assumed the role of liquor dealers Saturday and said they would accept bids on worth of confiscated liquor SAME mum piut il havrs afternoon with liis wife and son Arthur apparently were discarded Saturday morning Col Sidney Huff one of his aides told reporters that MacAr thur plans to mg and may not leave the apart ment at all t 10000Mile Trip And indications werethat Mrs MacArthur would decline too and spend the day with him in their luxurious 37th floor suite in the Waldorf Towers Both were visibly tired after the 10000mile air trip from Tokyo and the acclaim ten dered them by 10000000 people in 5 cities Thirteen year old Arthur how evercouldnt wait until p m game time and the clash between the New York Giants and the Brooklyn Dodgers at the Polo Grounds which will be the first major league contest he ever has witnessed Huff and Lt Col Anthony Stor ey the generals pilot were to ac company the boy The MacArthurs went to bed early Friday night after thetu multuous festivities which brought 7500000 persons to the sidewalks of New York for oneof the great est parades in world history for a returninghero Mrs MacArthur was up at 8 oclock and had breakfast alone The general and Arthur stayed abed several hours later MacArthurs the rest of the weekend and next week were indefinite Uj to Committees We just dont know what were going to do his personal physi cian Col Charles C Canada said The situation as far as I know is in ihe hands of other people namely the committees in Wash ington He was referring to the con gressional investigating commit tees which plan to look into the reasons for the presidents firing of MacArthurand the administra tions far eastern foreign policy Canada said MacArthur seems to grow stronger as he goes along despite the strenuous pace he has kept since leaving Tokyo last Monday and his successive recep tions in Honolulu San Francisco Washington and New York The WaldorfAstoria hotel said it was planning on the genera making a minimum stay of two weeks in their 130aday presi dential suite Chicago Next But Chicago is planning to wel come the general there with another reception next week pos sibly Wednesday or Thursday and several other cities including Mil waukee St Louis and Murfrecs boro Tenn are bidding for ap pearances by MacArthur Street cleaners still were clean ing up Saturday from the record 2852tons of confetti ticker tape and torn paper rained down Fri day on the MacArthur Day 37 mile parade which was witnessec by 7500000 persons We shall never forget it Mac Arthur told New Yorkers as he accepted a scroll of honor and a special gold medal You have made us feel that we are indeed home farewell of the famous veteran came over the air That was the effectof the spokenwords as landled by a master orator rJi Not by MacArthur J However some who didnt hear he speech but have had to base heir opinion on the printed word lave been wondering whether these very intimate phrases were Concedes Mac Privileged to Make Emotional Appeal goodbye there were tears among as their been afraid of Churchills un canny skill with words and his ability to arouse emotions MacArthur has the knack of emotionalappealHe used it in lis address before congress There are some who maintain that such emotionalism has no place in public life They insist hat we guided by cold logic At first blush that sounds like an irrefutable argument Still while broadly speaking itis true think emotionalism has itsplace Manyofthe finest acts of man kind are due to the emotional appeal And so unless we are to be ruled solely by our heads and never Tpy our hearts I think must concede MacArthur the right to resort yio some emotional ap peal j in making this historicde fense of his stewardshipin the far east too emotional and somewhat on the corny side Well it perhaps s true that coming from a novice such expressions might have seemed corny but not when de ivered by a MacArthur Authorities on public speaking assaying this address have placed MacArthur mthe class of great speakers who have employed the oratorical style of the cen ury s Britains Winston Churchill is cited as being in this classifica tion which is reminiscent of the days of famous speakers like Wil liam Jennings Bryan and his cross of gold speech This style of oratory depends heavily on the emotional appeal and it calls skil f it is to be kept from becoming theatrical Churchill is a past mas ter of emotional speaking as wit ness such famous utterances as his call to arms against Hitler in May of 1940 That was when as prime minister he told the house of com mons in impassioned tones I say to this house as I said to the ministers who have joined this government I have nothing to of fer but blood toil tears and sweat Churchill a Master That was emotionalism at its peak Yet as handled by a rnastei like Churchill ithad the effect of an electric shock on his people They surged to the defense of their country And this sensation al appeal also swept through al lied nations and spurred them to greater efforts I have seen Churchill in action many times especially in the house of commons going back as far as 1916 when he was more or less a lone wolf politically in parliament There never has been a time when opponents haven The two committees will sit ogether for an investigation ate this month of far eastern mil tary and diplomatic policies Their differences were charac eristic of a congressional split so deep it erupted into a tussle Fri day between 3 of 4 senators re cording a radio debateonthe is sues MacArthurs firing hasraised Clothing Rumpled The 3 contestants Senators Humphrey and Leh nan DLibNY on one side and Senator Capehart RInd on the agree on exactly what happened Every ones tempers and clothing uriipled considerably Senator Taft ROhio acted as peace naker He agreed with the others how ever that the 4 couldnt agree on MacArthurs program to fight an expanded war against the commu nists in Korea or on whether mil itary men generally shared Mac Arthurs views MacArthur has called fory a naval blockade of the China coast a tightened economic blockade ol red China the freeing of allied air power to operate over Man churia and supply support foi Chinese nationalist troops on For on the New 12Man Wage Board Is Created Washington Tru man Saturday created a new 18 member wage stabilization boarc with power to recommend settle ment of a wide variety of labor management disputes affecting the defense program The tobe named in a few days George W Taylor University of Pennsyl vania professor of industry has already agreed to serve as chair man until the board is organized The new board will comprise members each from industry la bor and the public It will replace a smaller board which broke up two months ago when organized labor withdrew from all defense agencies charging big business was running the show 525 for MacArthur and for Truman Apparently senators are not the only persons who become involvec in fisticuffs when the Truman MacArthur controversy is dis cussed Police said that hot words concerning the two led to blows and finally to arrest of two Mason City men Friday night Charged with disorderly conduct in police court Saturdav morning were Fred F Galkin 209 16th N W and Raymond Decker who gave no address Galkin was fined S25 and costs and Decker forfeited a S25 bond Editors Asked to Battle Dangerous News Suppression China mainland He addedjfnra speechto con gress Thursday that the joini chiefs of staff had shared his military viwes When he fired MacArthur from his far east commands Presiden Truman said his policies in Korea mighttouch of World war III Counter Statements The defense department count ered MacArthurs speech with i statement in which it said the join chiefs had recommended his dis missal Hickenlooper told a reportei Saturday that whether the chiefs concurred in ousting the 5star general was not the point He added The big issue is Did they ap prove of MacArthurs program as he said they did MacArthur told congress tha the chiefs of staff had shared his major military views Hickenlooper and t S e n a t o r Knowland RCal predictedtha the general would back up tha statement with documents Anc in Tokyo a officia said MacArthur certainly could Senator Douglas DI11 said Friday night it will be up to the American people to decide the is sue raised by MacArthurs dis missal and we should do so on the merits of the case and not on the basis of either hero worshi or personal hatreds and antagon isms Fears for Peace Douglas said in a speech White Sulphur Springs W Va that General MacArthurs fa eastern policies could causi Russia openly to enter the war and start world war three In New York Senator Byrd D Va told 500 personsat a dinne in his honor that MacArthurs dis missal was a tragedy oferrors that is leading to greater disunity within this country i Speaking of the split over fa eastern policy on top ofia division in the country over domestic pol icies Byrd How can we fight communism if we are to fight among selves By STERLING F GREEN j Washington Amerioan1 Society of Newspaper Editors was advised Saturday to fight what one of its committees described as an increasing tendency toward arrogant suppression of news by government officials The committee on freedom of information in a report prepared for Saturdays convention session told some 400 editors We are beginning to suspect that the biggest uncovered story of our time is the insidious seizure of news prerogatives by public of ficials The committee headed by James S Pope of the Louisville Courier Journal recommended that editors wage the fight not only through news and editorial columns but through the courts when neces sary More often publicity Itself Is Ihc simplest and most devastating ammunition action against crecy Pope said The report contained a longj sampling of cases of news inter ference by public officials ranging from city clerks to the heads of federal agencies The committee found serious fault with the advisory censor ship for businessmen reccntlyset up by the commerce department This policy encourages industry to withhold data which concerned advanced industrial develop ments production knowhow and technology strategic equipment special installations From this the report ranged through a score of cases down to the withholding of half the mar riage licenses in Yonkers New York How anybody in Yonkers knows who is living in wedded bliss and who in sin is a mystery the re port observed Allies Turn Attacks Rifle Butts By OLEN CLEMENTS Tokyo troops beat off red counterattackswithfists md rifle butts Friday night lought Saturday for thelast ridges barring capture of Chorwon Trie reds briefly penetrated United Nations lines in west cen tral Korea Friday night They struck in defense of Chorwon ransport hub 18 miles north of he 38th parallel border of red Korea The red attack with hand gre nades and automatic weapons carried through allied lines at one point It separated two allied ele ven ts and forced one UN com pany back to reform Fleht Early Saturday thecompany fought back up the 1500 foot height with the aid of artillery fire Heavy artillery Ibatteriesjblastec redtroop concentration areas be fore dawrt Saturday north al liedwon Hwachon reservoir in central Korea Flares lighted the target area AP Correspondent Jim Becker said the heaviest bombardment hit 4 miles north of the reservoir andabout 200 yards east Of the Suritchon river Another field dispatch reported an unopposed UN advance ovei ridge tops near the captured town of Hwachon Ordered Back Korean military sources said a captured Chinese red reported the communists have been ordered to pull back to the 39th parallel to await reinforcements The re port was without confirmation Tlte39th parallels 70 miles in side red Korea A gradual red withdrawal has been in progress all along the front But allied sources estimate the 600000 communist troops are north of the ChorwonKumwha line A red counteroffensive has been Considered probable The reds made several coun terattacks Friday south and south east of Chorwon Five hundred made one of these assaults The attack lost 75 killed and 150 to 175jWOunded Incentral Korea near the east ern end of Hwachon reservoir an allied tankinfantry e 1 e m e n clashed for 4 hours reds The reds finally withdrew Apologized to Truman Report Says Saw Little Chance of Chinese Fight Washinrton The New York Times says that administra tion records show thatGen Mac Arthur when he met with v Presi dent Truman last fall island wasso confident of victory in Korea that he offered his best troops for Europe The Times re port said he apologized for em barrassing thepresident on the Formosa issue andpredicted th Chinese communists would not enter the Korean conflict jv The Times in a byline story Saturday by Anthony LWiero1 says it gained its information from documented on neeting of MacArthur and Mr Truman on the midPacific atoll Oct 15 A partial summaryof the story i 5 Mac Arthur offered to send to Europe what he regarded his best troops the XT S second di vision because believed it would have good in Eur ope MacArthur told the president ie saw little of Chinese or Russian intervention in Korea MacArthur apologized Cruman for embarrassing him on Formosa issue V There wasno immediate com ment at the white house or Penta gon on the Tiroes story Mr Tru TOTING MAN KILLED West Point Boe ding 19 was killed early Satur day when his car overturned on a county road near West Point All About The WEATHER Can Avert War Price Believes Washington T Casey Jones of the Syracuse Herald Journal Saturday was elected president of the American Societyof Newspaper Editors He succeeds Dwight Young of the Dayton Ohio Journal Herald Earlier Byron Price assistant secretary general of the United Nations told the editors that he doesnt believe there will be a World war we keep our heads and keep our powder dry The UN official said he thinks a general war is less likely because of the directness with which the challenge of communism was met in Korea He said American newspapers wield a tremendous influence on only through their editorial columns but by the man ner in which they present news Mason City Rain continuing into Sunday occasionally mixed with snow Cooler Sunday Lov Saturday night 42 High Sun day 45 Iowa Scattered showers in wes Saturday night and over entin state Sunday Somewhat colde Sunday Low Saturday nigh 3035 northwest 4550 south east High Sunday 4050 Fur ther Outlook Cloudy and coo Monday more rain likely b Tuesday Minnesota Rain Saturday nigh and Sunday except mostly snov in northwest and extreme nortl Saturday night Sonvewha warmer Saturday night and in northeast portion Sunday Low Saturday night 3035 rtorthwes to 3540 southeast High Sun day near 40 northwest and 40 45 southeast Globe Gazette weather statis tics for the 24 hours ending at 8 a m Saturday April 21 Maximum Minimum At in Precipitation Year ago Maximum Minimum 57 37 37 78 47 26 General Dmfltt MMArthir were taken enl PrwMent f erred on of the time talkel atone Thestatement IWM by Gen Courtney Whitney when New York whJeh Mid ihowed that the Ar thur WM M tare of victory in Korea he offered Ills beat troop for Europe man was spending the weekend aboard the yacht Chesapeake bayi Senator Aiken reporter If the New York Times can gain access to such documents then I say its time the administra tion made them available to con gress It should do so promptly House Speaker Rayburn TexO however told Times account was tor me Public Before He said much of the information had been made public before He declined to say he had ever seen or read an official re port on the meeting Chairman Vinson DGa of the house armed services declined to comment on the report Rep Hebert a member of the committee indicated that the group ultimately will in quire into the relations between MacArthur and the joint chiefs of staff He said the report indi cates a necessity for the whole thing to be thoroughly ventilated The seriatearmed services com mittee already has announced plans for an inquiry to start in a couple of weeks Last August the general message to the Veterans of For eign Wars suggesting American occupation of Formosa last strong hold of the Chinese nationalists led by Chiang Kaishek The pres ident then asked MacArthur to withdraw his message to the V F W The president has favored neu tralization of Formosa by the U S 7th fleet until its status could be settled by the United Nations the United States partici pating in the discussions At the hourlong meeting on Wake island the president and the general amiably talked away their differences The newspaper said that MacArthur said he was sorry for the difficulties and embarrass ments he caused the president and that he now understood Mr Trumans position with respect to the strategic island Japan by Christmas MacArthur predicted that or ganized resistance would end in the whole Korean peninsula by last Thanksgiving day and said he loped to withdraw the 8th army to Japan by Christmas This view was widely reported at the timt by news sources As for Mr Trumans planfor a Pacific projected the actual pact this like thi   

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