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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - March 1, 1951, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME MASON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE THI NEWS PA MR THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NtGHIORS VOL LVD Pros Full Paper of Two SecttooiSecUon Russia Agrees to See Big 3 in Paris Soon By THOMAS P WHITNEY Moscow WP agreed Thursday to a meeting of Big 4 deputies in Paris Monday and assigned a top man 1st Deputy Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko to the job Britain announced she would send a delegation and this was said by a foreign office spokesman to mean she had ac cepted a Soviet reply to the western proposals France prob ably will assign Alexandra Parodi a top diplomat French sources said adding that they saw no strings attached to the Soviet reply However in Washington a state depart ment spokesman said it still uncertain whether the deputies meeting would open Monday Russia Names 20 The Soviet Union agreeing to the western proposal that the dep uties discuss an agenda for a pos iible major conference of the Big 4 foreign ministers announced i1 ment Thursday ready to allow a would send a delegation of 20 persons a number of them top ranking experts The Russian acceptance was handed to the ambassadors of the United States Britain and France They were called to the soviet foreign office to receive a reply to parallel notes their governments sent Feb 19 suggesting such a meeting The deputies will try to map out agenda for a proposed big 4 council of foreign ministers meet Ing to discuss problems causing world tension Meet at Palace The French foreign office Wednesday announced that it had chosen the Pink Palace Palaise Rose in Paris as the meeting place of the deputies If these preliminary talks can bring about a big 4 foreign min isters conference it will be the Sth since the Potsdam agreement of 1945 provided for such meetings The last one was held in the fall of 1949 when the big 4 failed to agree on an independence treaty for occupied Austria The idea of a new big 4 meeting was suggested by Russia ii a note on Nov 3 1950 The Soviet Union wanted the ministers to discuss German questions alone particu larly the issue of German rearma ment But the western powersre jected this proposal insisting any such meeting should deal with other world problems as well Report Auto Price Raise Is Ready Washington fi The govern was reported per cent in crease in the prices of new auto mobiles The order was expected to be issued by the office of price sta bilization later Earlier an OPS spokesman said the agency expects to issue an auto price order Thursday and that it would be more than just an extension of the present order The spokesman would not elab orate on this But it was learned from other officials who are thoroughly fa miliar with the forthcoming or der that a 3i per cent increase had been approved The present order dated last Dec 18 holds the prices of new automobiles at Dec 1 levels The order is due to expire Thursday There has been some legal question as to whether it ex pired last midnight or will expire Thursday night at midnight The wording says a period ending March 1 1951 unless otherwise modified amended or extended prior to that date OPS officials take the view that since a new order is imminent the exact moment of the expiration is immaterial Reports that small increases in new car prices would be permit ted in Thursdays order could not be confirmed at the OPS But it was known OPS officials for some time have been studying reports indicating some car man ufacturers are losing money un der the Dec I ceiling price DAIRY INSTITUTE ELECTS DCS Moines John H Snow gren of Marshalltown has been elected president of the North Central States Institute an organ ization of poultry butter and cheese processors buyers and handlers John Yundt Indepen dence was elected vice president Hans Halvorson Humboldt re elected treasurer and Earl E Ma son Webster City reelected ex ecutive secretary SAMK aickni trtfflo death In put 21 UN Army Expects Big Red Drive By TOM BftADSHAW Tokyo The UN army in Korea is holding a gigantic Chi nese firecracker The sputtering fuse may reach the powder within the next 3 weeks If the big explosion comes as a doordie communist offensive it may well include the boom of ar tillery and the roar of an esti mated 3000 enemy planes The 3 military musts the Chi nese reds either have failed to use or just havent had thus far in Korea are 1 transport 2 ade quate artillery and 3 air power 3000 Planes The Chinese reds are believed to have a combat air force of up to 3000 planes including fighters apd medium bombers That force could carry out an estimated 300 sorties single flights in the 1st 24 hours of a major communist drive How long they could continue that pace is another question but certainly it would last throughthe 1st devastating stage of a fensive The UN army in Korea has grown dangerously contemptuous of the enemys air power There just hasnt been any fear thus far Allied units are camped brazenly along river bottoms and in ex posed tar gets for air attack flight over the front line plainly shows this danger The al lied side is a beehive of obvious activity but when the actual front line is reached there is no sign of the enemy And the Sth armys supply lines are vulnerable to an extreme Vir tually every major rail line and road passes through narrow de files easily blasted from the air Needs Met There is substantial evidence Chinese needs for both artillery and transport are being met Until recently a Chinese red army in Korea consisted of from 2 to 5 divisions to each artillery and a transport division up among the various army units for tactical use The transport would include every available vehicle and beast of burden The artillery would include both 100 mm and 150 mm guns drawn by vehicles and horses The equipping and disposition of these new units is believed in an advanced stage Estimates of when they will be ready for battle range from 3 weeks to 2 months Congress Troop Talk No Help to Relations s With World Truman AP Wirephoto COLLAZO Collazo is moved from one court building to another during a recess in his trial in Washington D C on a charge of murder in the death of a white house guard during an attempt to assassinate Pres ident Truman at Blair House last Nov 1 Collazo is hand cuffed to two men not shown and guarded by U S marshals Reach Pay Settlement With Railroad Workers Washington white by a labor re volt over wage y Thursday hammered out a pay settlement for 1000000 nonoperative railroad work Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Fair Thursday night Continued cold Low Thursday night 5 to 10 above Friday cloudy and warmer with high about 40 Iowa Generally fair Thursday night Friday cloudy rain or snow northwest and rain south west beginning Friday after noon or night Low Thursday night 18 to 25 except locally zero to 10 above north central portion Rising temperature Fri day with high 35 to 40 northeast 50 to 55 southwest Further out look Not quite so cold north portion Friday night with low 25 to 30 Rain sleet or snow Friday night or Saturday Sun day generally fair No important temperature change Minnesota Partly cloudy Thurs day night and Friday except snow flurries northeast portion Thursday night Colder Thurs day night with low 010 above but locally 510 below north west and west central portions Somewhat warmer south Fri day High 1520 north 2030 south IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics for the 24 hours ending at 8 a m Maximum 32 Minimum 11 At 8 a m 12 Precipitation 43 5 in snow YEAR AGO Maximum 30 Minimum i 1 The pact will give members of the 15 unions involved an mmediate cent an hour wage boost plus a cost of liv ng adjustment every 3 months Retroactive The 12 cent pay boost is retroactive to Feb 1 This a compromise The unions had wanted the ncrease made effective as of ast Dec 1 and the carriers lad advocated a March 1 date Thursdays settlement has no direct bearing on another rail dispute involving oper ating workers switchmen enginmen firemen lave staked sporadic strikes The non operating em ployes including such work rs as shop men clerks and machinists had been getting an average pay of an lour before the wage increase The 1st of the costofliving djustments due April s expected to add 4 or 5 cents an hour Up All Night The agreement reached after an allnight session also provides for socalled productivity raises starting July 1 1952 if the gov ernments stabilization program permits payments such as those spelled out in some auto workers contracts It was the governments in ability to win organized labors support for a wage stabilization formula that led to a decision by the United Labor Policy commit tee Wednesday night to pull out of all participation in the mobili zation program Settlement of the nonoperating unions wage fight after only 4 months of negotiations left rail mediators free to concentrate on efforts to bring about an agree ment with the 4 big operating brotherhoods Their twoyearold dispute finally led to government seizure of the railroads last fall Presidential Assistant John R Steelman announced Thursdays settlement at an early morning news conference Steelmans announcement came after a nightlong session at the white house climaxing negotia tions which had begun last Oct 25 The 15 unions originally had asked for a 25 cent hourly wage increase for their members in cluding shop employes machin ists clerks and others who do not actually run the trains The carriers estimated that the 2J cent increase will cost them annually Another increase estimated at 4 to 5 cents an hour will be added to the 124 cents around April 1 based on the governments cost ofliving index of Feb 15 A still further boost in the hour ly wage rate will be permitted in the summer of 1952 if the gov ernments stabilization program permits the kind ofproductivity allowance called for by the C I OAuto Workers contract in the automobile industryV More for Productivity That is supposed to allow anoth er 4 cents an hour to compensate forimproved productivity over the past year effective May 29 The union chiefs speaking through George E Leighty chair man of the Railway Labor Execu tives association Said no further ratification by the unions is ne cessary He told a news conference the agreement was signed sealed and delivered on the spot after the all night session This explanation was significant because a similar agreement was announced under parallelcircum stances at the white house last Dec 21 for the 4 operating rail unions That settlement was later rejected by local chairmen of the operating unions The n e w agreement specifies that no further wage increase will be sought until Oct 1 1953 The main action at the center of the line sparked similar allied advances at the west ern and eastern anchors of a 60mile front U S 3rd division doughboys ought on the western end of the ine Seventh division infantry men battled at the eastern end Maj Maurice Roach of Mem phis a marine battalion comman der described the bloody end of lie marine fight for the two hills When they reached the sky ine I saw them leap into the Chi nese trenches and saw them hrusting and stabbing with their bayonetted rifles Near Road Rub The marine assault forces lumped off at 2 a m Nine hours ater they had taken two crests of Cloverleaf hill just west of the ment against Kitts in connection Twinnam river This is the nearest ligh point to the strategic road lub of Hoengsong Then the marines shifted their attack northwest toward Hill 315 where the main enemy defenders were believed dug in Two miles tothe west another marine Iqree ram into a tougher fight in their assault againslt Eprt Dodgeas defense counsel for Must License Exports to Reds Washington com merce department announced Thursday that beginning Friday licenses will be required for the shipment of any article to the so viet bloc This was a further tightening of already strict controls on ex ports to Russia and its satellites Hitherto the department has required licenses only for war potential items or goods that are scarce in this country By uni formly denying licenses it has effectively banned shipments of such goods to Russiandominated areas But shipments of goods like underwear and socks tooth brushes garden implements and so on have been allowed without a license After Friday they too must be licensed Officials of the departments of fice of international trade which handles license grants stressed the purpose of the new order is not to place a complete embargo on all shipments to the Soviet bloc Instead they said the aim is to enable OIT to know in ad vance what shipments are pro posed to those areas and to deny export licenses where appropriate in the national interest Gambling Take Is 20 Billion Marine Bayonets Disgorge Chinese From 2 Key Hills By OLEN CLEMENTS Tokyo S marines dived into hilltop trenches north of Hoengsong Thursday with flashing bayonets and wrested two key heights from Chinese red defenders Both hills were taken in quick order by the leathernecks who led UN central front forces at the heart of a 40000 man red Chinese force dug in north of Hoengsong Innocent Kitts Pleads Mason City Trial Set for March 14 Port Dodge Kitts 33 Omaha Neb pleaded innocent Wednesday to federal bank rob bery charges and U S District Judge Henry N Graven set the opening of Kitts trial for 10 a m March 14 at Mason City Kitts attorney Hugh Boyle of Omaha entered the plea for his client on all 3 counts of an indict wooded Hill 438 which Tises 1500 feet from the valley floor The hinese holed in resisted all ef forts to dislodge them Allied tanks artillery and planes hit the enemy along parts of the entire communist line Line Straightener The allied actions on the west ern central and eastern fronts had semblance of a general attack But UN commanders indicated each was limited in scope They ikened them more to linestraight ening thrusts than to an overall drive AP Correspondent Stan Swinton reported from U S Sth army headquarters that UN forces spearheaded by the marines had ashed out in a limited objective assault oil a 25mile front against he bitterlyheld red defense line north of Hoengsong Swinton said American frout ine officers consider the Hoeng ong front the strategic key to he war at the moment He said he fiat exposed terrain on the vestern front and the wild tumble of mountains on the eastern front made it seem probable that any hinese counterblow would come on the central sector Force Chinese Move Swinton said the chief purpose of the central front action was to make the Chinese either stand and light or get out of the area best suited for red counterattack On the western end of the bat leline the U S 3rd infantry divi sion drove against twomile Long Sand island in the Han river Sand s a lowlying island 4 miles east of redheld Seoul the former re publican capital The 3rd division troops met leavy mortar fire from the out skirts of Seoul Capture of Sand island would enable the allies to put tanks across the river into the flatlands east of Seoul Prudential Plans Chicago Skyscraper Chicago Prudential Insurance Co Thursday an nounced plans to build its larg est regional home 35 story downtown Chicago It will be the 1st skyscraper to be built in Chicago since 1934 when the Field building wa scom pleted at LaSalle Adams and i Clark streets with the burglary of the Laurens bank last Nov 3 Also brought into court was Yancy Douglas Hardy 32 of Ty ler Tex who is similarly charged bets and in the Laurens case After Hardy said he was without funds to em ploy an attorney Judge Graven appointedDenis of Senate Crime Probe Figure Conservative Declaration ofWarfower By CHARLES MOLONY Washington if organized gambling is taking in 000 a year in this country the American people are putting more into bets than they are into cloth ing and shoes Furthermore gambling outlays of that size are considerably larger than total retail expenditures for autos and parts plus gas and oil or the aggregate prices of houses bought and indeed nearly one third as much as total retail spend ing on food and drink The senate crime committee produced the whopping gambling figure in a report issued Wednes day but it didnt itemize or make clear just how it arrived at its es timate or what it was counting in the total Organized In all the report said the committee figures conservatively President Confident of Solving Labor Walkout Crisis OLIVER Washington Truman said Thursday con gress can debate the troops toEurope issuearid anything else itwants to but that does not meanit helpsrelations with the rest of theworld He made the remarkin re sponse to news conference questions dealing with a re port on presidential and gressional war report was prepared request of senate which have hearings on tion that changes h every year in the United Stages as a result of organized bling Committee staff soiiifcw ex pressed doubt that the jwport was double iscount ing money taken in on care of opera taking One staff membe suggested tna it was comparable flo HardyKelleherwas associated in the defense of Ralph Capone in an income tax case in Chicago some years ago and is a prominent mem ber of the Iowa bar Kitts was brought here from Sioux City for arraignment and Hardy was brought from Cedar Rapids After conference with his attor ney Hardy also entered a plea oi innocent Judge Graven announced that Kitts and Hardy would be tried simultaneously The courtroom was filled with county and federal peace officers After the arraignments the closely guarded Kitts was to be returned o Sioux City and Hardy to Cedar Rapids the U S Marshals office reported M L Larry Mason Mason City attorney late Wednesday was appointed attorney for Hardy in place of Kelleher In making the appointment Judge Graven explained that an attorney ap pointed by a federal court receives no compensation or allowance for expenses Under the circumstances the judge stated Kelleher is not to continue as counsel And since counsel so appointed will need to confer frequently with the said defendant in preparing the case for trial Hardy will be confined in the city jail at Mason City Russians Reduce Prices Or to High Figure Moscow Russian press Thursday hailed the announce ment of commodity price reduc tions in the Soviet Union and compared it with fabulously ris ng prices in the United States and other western countries The new prices are still fab ulously high by U S standards No figures came through the Mos ow censorship but best available information would provide these examples Milk 135 rubles a quart white bread 230 rubles a sound butter 17 a pound pork 1360 a pound soup meat 8 a pound When these are related to jurcbasing average Russian laborer may make 700 ru jles a will be seen hat the Russians money is worth far less than an American work mans sales or mean point of a slot mac or horse race bookra bet from the publics i would operate Or total Staff Best Guess members ach the estimate necessarily I a best guess dealing with cash transactions of 1 more to be concealed ti vealed by precise record keeping In anybodys language 000000 a year is big money Heres how it stacks up department figures on other con sumer outlays which means tota amounts spent on retail purchases Overall consumer spending Currently a record 000 a year Outlays on autos and a year on gas and oil Furniture and other household Clothing and shoes 000000 Food and drink inclucling liquor beer wine A a year gam bung bill would dwarf the aggre gate prices of allhouses bought in a year which latest federal re serve board data placeat 200000000 in 1949 The committeemade it plain did not mean gambling operators as a profit all the money they take inV although ii didsay anot inconsiderable por tion of stays with promoters and Congress Asked for Extra Washington President Truman asked congress Thurs day for an additional 000000 for the defense produc tion and civil defense programs He sought in ap propriations and in borrowing authority for ex penses of defense production and in appropria tions for the federal civil de fense administration AH of the funds were re quested for expenses in the cur rent fiscal year ending July 1 The additional in borrowing authority was asked to enable emergency agenciestoexpand plant pro duction capacity and supply under the defense production act CoPilot Dives to Death Trying to Close Airplane Door Dallas youthful air force veteran checking an un latcheddooron a Pioneer airlines plane plunged 4000 feet from the craft early Thursday over the lit tle town of Exell Tex Around him were 20 sleeping United States airmen unaware that the flyer had fallen Spokes men at Pioneer headquarters here said there could be no presump tion other than that he died The victim was Joseph Henry Dowd 27 of Dallas He was co pilot of the chartered plane It was enroute from Lackland air forcebase San Antonio to Lowry field Denver Jack Kemp Pioneer public in formation director quoted this story as toldby the planes cap tain Glenn C Edds of Dallas The plane taking off from Amarillo was airborne when Edds noted a warning light on his instrument panel showing an unlatched rear door He sent Dowd to the rear to investigate When Dowd failed to return the pilot awoke one of the air men The serviceman could not find Dowd The plane then had been in the air about 15 minutes and was at 4000 feet The pilot estimated the plane was over Exell about 40 miles northwest of Amarillo Edds said he felt the plane lurch shortly tfter Dowd went to the rear to check the door The plane returned to Amarillo Another plane was flown to Dal las to carry the airmen to Den ver Kemp said the original plane a DCS twinengine craft would be thoroughly checked to find the cause of the mishap Dowd a 1st lieutenant during World war II with the army air force is survived by his wife and a child inbre troops western defenses Elisabeth May Craig iKfeporter for the Portland Maine Press Herald the report as saying the circum stances of jflie present crisis make any debate over prerogatives and power essentiallysterile il not dangerous to the success of our foreign policy Mr Truman commented he did not feel in anyway that congress should not debate fore ten jpolicy to say that confreM could talk about anything it wanted to but this doesnt mean the debates Tielp foreign relations Report Mrs Craig then noted the re port declared of the con gressional power to declare war fallen into abeyance because are no longer declared in 4he asked the president in view of tftat statement was go fill the gap between the ial power and the con power to declare war man suggested she read the nation history since Dec 7 1941 Peart Harbor day and that would answer the question Mrs Craig again asked how he would take foe gap in wardeclaring The president not answer that becitMoiifeitnot confronted with Much of erence was devotee to organized abors withdrawal from pation In the defense mobilizatioli irogram in protest against 4he way it is being handled by Di rector Charles E Wilson Praises Wilson The president ideclined commenf on most of thequestions but said ic had full confidence in Wilsoii and that he consideredthe action of the united labor policy commit ee as just a disagreement HeSaid he did notconsider it as a reporter put it a strike against the government He said be will not change his plans to go to Key West Fla Fri day for a 3 weeks stayand might lave something to say on the con roversy in a week or two The president opeired the con erence by expressing gratifica ion over the settlement early Thursday of the wage dispute be ween the railroads and nonop erating unions He congratulated 0th sides and remarked that the white housesponsored agreement was reached without any threat of a strike and he thinks everybody s happy Declines Comment A reporter quoted a labor offi ial as saying that if Franklin D lobsevelt was in the white house lie rail labor controversy would ave beensettled months ago This was an apparent reference to the till unsettled case involving the perating unions Mr Truman said it is a collec ve bargaining transaction and the resident ought not to interfere vith that He said the railroad nions came to the white house at heir own request and not his The president refused to meat on the current senate inves gation of crime the reconstruc on finance corporations lending perations and last years sena orial election in Maryland SWEEPER Centerville has new street sweeper Its 1st ssignment early this week was to lean up the city square ons of dirt were picked up by machine   

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