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Mason City Globe Gazette: Friday, February 23, 1951 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - February 23, 1951, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS PAPER FOR THE HOME MASON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE THI NIWSPAPIR THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS HOME EDITION umu tfm rOL LVtl Auocutcd utd United Full LMM Win Tin Copjrt MASON CITY IOWA FRIDAY FEBRUARY 23 1951 This Paper Consists of Two No lit President Produces File on Congress Involving RFC Loans Yank Forces in Swift Push Through Reds By OLEN CLEMENTS Tokyo tf Tankled American forces punched swiftly up the mountainous spine of central Korea late Friday and occupied freshly vacated red foxholes overlooking Hoeng key communist defense point The twin U S spearheads were setting the pace for the powerful allied offensive that shoved ahead virtually un opposed all along the muddy 60mile front Brief but bitter red resistance was met in some sectors earlier Friday This indicated the communists are fightandrun tactics against the 100000man redkiller drive AP Correspondent Stan Swinton reported American forces advanc ing on Hoengsong in the middle lector of the front were within mile and a quarter of the burned out town The push carried miles In Foxholes American soldiers using occupied foxholes dug by the communists for themselves while tanks and dive bombers dropped tons of mis siles into the town Swinton re ported from outside Hoengsong At dusk the American tanks and troops pulled back slightly to make themselves secure for the night in full possession of the hills overlooking valley the Hoengsong The advance was on a route lit tered with wrecks of American vehicles knocked out during the Illfated communist attack toward Wonju 10 days ago Wonju key to the southcentral mountain pass es is 10 miles south of Hoeng Swinton said allied gunfire on Hoengsong was restrained on the possibility that American prison ers are still being held there North of City A South Korean major who theChinese reported the reds were concentrated north of the city On the eastern flank of the rugged twisting central front American forces captured rubbled Pyongchang withdut a fight and pushed 4 miles beyond to a lateral road leading to Hoengsong Pyong chang is 25 miles southeast of Hoengsong On the far western front Amer ican and communist guns roared In an artillery duel across the rainswollen Han river near Seoul The reds tried to push two recon naissance patrols across the stream but they were sent scurrying back Reds in company strength were battled by Americans advancing miles north of Chipyong on the westcentral Seoul front southeast of Action was developing in that sector late Friday after being al ternately lively and then quiet It was in that sector early Fri day that the 2nd battalion of Canadas famed Princess Patricia regiment swept easily through red opposition astride the Seoul Hongchon road west of Hoeng song It was the 1st action of the Ko rean war for the Princess Pats and brought to 6 the nations in the cur rent ground forces drive against the Chinese and Korean reds Others are Americans British Australian New Zealand and South Koreans Seoul Not Important The far western and far eastern sectors were comparatively quiet Allied troops south of the thawing Han river near Seoul were under gome communist artillery tank and mortar fire UN forces have made no largescale assault on the now useless former south Korean capital Seoul was abandoned to the reds early in January after red Chinas entry into the Korean conflict forced the UN forces to withdraw to better defense positions below Parallel 38 This was after the al lies had punched to the Yalu riv er boundary of Manchuria 11 two places and were approaching it in strength Nicholas Names Senate Sifting Group Des Moines 13member sifting committee on legislation pending in the senate was ap pointed Friday by Lt Gov W H Nicholas RMason The committee will not be em powered to take over any bills listed on the senate calendar until the senate gives its approval This may be done any time after the legislature returns from its spring recess March 5 Senator A LDoud RDouds was named chairman of the com mittee which includes 11 repub licans and two democrats The other members are Senators X T Prentis RMount Arthur Jacobson RWau Elmer Bekman ROt R J Oltman RStorm Leo Elthon Loyd Van Patten J C Colburn W Eldon Walter Don Risk J T Dykhoiise RRock Burl N Ridout A E Augustine Senator Elthon is the republican floor leader and Augustine the minority leader Senator Doud heads a subcommittee of the sen ate appropriations group which has been studying budget requests of state educational institutions Doud also is the principal au thor of the state loyalty bill intro duced in the senate earlier this week The purpose of this bill is to prohibit employment of any sub versive persons in public offices The senate had received about 20 new bills when it recessed at noon It agreed to remain in in formal session until 5 D m so that senators could introduce any further bills before Fridays dead line on introduction of measures sy individuals Among the new senate bills offered were ones which would Exempt wedding and engage nent rings from taxation prohibit breweries from furnishing fixtures or financial aid to beer retailers authorize cities to license cigar ette vending machines exempt rom the little known Iowa poll ax all men who belong to units of the armed forces Truman Boils at Charge RFC Influenced by Aide Washington Truman steaming over cap itol hill charges one of his aides influenced RFC loans has got from the lending agency copies of its correspondence about loans with congress to 900 letters in all Mr Trumans move in the redhot controversy was 1st brought out Friday at a senate banking subcommittees hearing on t h e question of whether RFC directors have yielded to influence and favoritism in handing out millions in government loans The white house later confirmed that Mr Truman had called for the correspondence At the eapitol Chairman W Elmer Harber of the RFC board of directors testified he had ordered copies of the Senate Decides to Bring Up Draft Bill Next Week Washington demo rats decided Friday to bring up or senate action early next week the bill permitting the drafting of 18yearolds Majority Leader McFarland DAriz told reporters the man power bill will be pushed ahead of a resolution dealing with the troops to Europe issue This represents a change of plans McFarland said it was de cided on because the draft meas ure is ready for action while committee work on the troopsto Europe resolution has not been completed letters delivered to the white house and had discussed their with the president himself Asked what purpose Presides Truman had in mind for using the correspondence Harber replied He didnt say Barbers statement capped wha had been an often angry session of the subcommittee Charges Plant It began with an accusation from Chairman Fulbright D Ark that the RFC had plan tec a report the senator himself had tried to influence a loan Senator Douglas DI11 put in that he had heard a group friend lyto the RFC planned a counter offensive to the senate hearings The senators got piecemeal their story of the RFCcongressional correspondence going to the white house after all RFC officials at their hearings first professed not to know who there had asked for it That question was settled def initely when President Secretary Joseph Short announced at the white house that Mr Truman had And as the senators finally pinned the details down the ac tual delivery of the papers was to Donald Dawson the aide the sub committee has accused of appar ently influencing RFC loans Closed Hearing That accusation was made in a subcommittee report to the senate The report was drafted largely on the basis of closed doors hearings The subcommittee decided on the public hearings after Mr Tru man scornfully called their report asinine He said Dawson should not submit to their questioning The president described the re port as apparently intended as a reflection on himself At the time of his news conference dis cussion Feb 9 he pointed to some papers on his desk and re marked that the report made no mention of RFC loan applications in which congress members had interested themselves Fulbright replied through re porters that no reflection on the president was intended Close to 1raman But names of persons close to Mr Truman have run all through the committees hearings Brought into it one way or another in addition to Dawson have been references to William M Boyle Jr the democratic national chair man and E Merl Young an in surance man whose wife had seen one of Mr Trumans stenog raphers for many Boyle and Mrs Young both worked for Mr Truman when he was a Mrs Young now is on the white house staff Soon after the senate group had tied down the fact of the white house move for the RFC congressional correspondence it ecessed its hearings until Mon day In between its gathering of the details on this it also 1 Learned the RFC has hired Eugene Kelly a Washington news paperman as 50aday public re lations adviser Kelly said he joined the RFC a week ago to day and expected to be retained one week or two the time the subcommittee ex pects its hearings to last Kelly said he was recommended to the RFC by James K Vardaman a member of the federal reserve Doard a Missourian and a sup porter of Mr Truman in the pres testimony of Ross Bohannon Tex as lawyer that E Merl Young once proposed to help him get RFC loan for the Tex mass Petroleum Co Young has disputed that Bohannon originally told his story on Wednesday He said Young asked an fee 3 Put Young back on the stanc and heard him deny he ever had represented himself as a nephew of President Truman whose moth ers maiden name was Young 4 Received from Joseph H Rosenbaum Washington lawyer a denial that he ever claimed to have RFC Directors Walter L Dun ham and William E Willett in his hip pocket The subcommittees report to the senate had said it received testimony that Rosen baum once made such a claim 5 Got from Willett a declara tion that he would quit the RFC board even if the senate were to confirm his longpending nomina tion Willett told the subcommit tee I dont care if I am con firmed or not If I were I would resign immediately because I cant ceep on with this kind of an in vestigation I am not ashamed of anything I have done in the RFC Actually since renpminat ng Willett and the other directors Mr Truman has proposed reor janizing the RFC under a single administrator dents dispute reserve board jond policies with over the federal government Support Texan 2 Got testimony from J Edward Johnson of Dallas and Edward P Morgan of Washington both at torneys tending to support the UN Committee in New Contact With Chinese Lake Success UN good offices committee was reported Triday to have made its 1st ap proach to communist China to see f Peiping will reconsider and dis cuss Korean peace terms with it Diplomatic sources said the 3 member committee had made its move in the last day or so through Swedish government contacts with red China The committee is awaiting an answer before mak ng its next move it was said The committee is composed of Nasrollah Entezam of Iran presi dent of the general assembly 5ven Grafstrom of Sweden and Louis Padilla Nervo of Mexico Committee members maintained complete secrecy on their action and have told newsmen they would have nothing to say Communist China Admits Purging Many Thousands Plan to Ship Troops East Gains Support By OLIVER W DeWOLF Washington ff President Trumans plan to send more troops to Europe apparently gained strong new support Fri day in the senate Chairman Russell of the senate armed services commit tee indicated he would back Chairman Connally of the foreign relations committee in a resolution which would endorse in advance any troop commit ments Mr Truman might make to North Atlantic defenses Russell told reporters he wanted some changes in the resolution but he hinted strongly he thought he and Connally could get to gether He said he would wait until they reached a final agree ment before making public the changes he proposed Connally expressed confidence an agreement would be reached It will be a bilateral resolu tion he declared when reporters told him of Russells attitude Harold Stassen former repub lican governor of Minnesota and now president of the University of Pennsylvania was due to tes tify on the troops to Europe is sue Friday The two committees are con sidering a resolution by Senate Republican Leader Wherry rof Nebraska This measure would seek to bar the president from sending troops to Europe unfj congress has set out a policy on the question Connally proposes to substitute his resolution for Wherrys He has proposed that it state simply that the success of the de fense effort requires the assign ment by North Atlantic treaty members of troops to the Euro pean force under Gen Dwight D Eisenhower but that the president should consult with congressional committees before making specific troop commitments Truck Passes Over Girl Misses Her Wichita Kans Blond 4yearold Jerry Jacobs clutching a candy sucker in her hand skipped across a street on the way home from a store She failed to notice a loaded dump truck until it was almost upon her Then she tripped and fell The driver jammed on the Drakes and veered slightly tq the right The heavy truck passed over he child Harry Bosley the 50yearold driver halted his truck and looked jack fearfully He sighed with re ief The wheels had bracketed Jerrys body as the truck passed over her She butunharmed clutching her candy sucker ASKS P D R REMEMBRANCE Washington resolution to make the birthday of the late President Roosevelt Jan 30 a legal holiday was introduced Thursday by Senator Lehman D N Bill to Enforce State Liquor Laws introduced Des Moines bill to au thorize state agents to go into Iowa cities and towns to enforce beer and liquor laws has been introduced in the Iowa house The measure prepared by At torney General Robert L Larson was filed Thursday by 6 repre sentatives Sponsors of the bill are Reps Elmer Bass RRed Gus Kuester George Paul Clifford Strawman L Dee Mallonee RAudubon and Gene Posten The bill earmarks 530000 a year from state liquor commission funds for beer and liquor law en forcement work by the state bu reau of investigation State officials estimated this sum would enable the bureau to add 4 agents and two clerical as sistants Attorney General Larson long has been critical of beer law en forcement in some parts of the state Present law prohibits state agents from going into cities or towns on enforcement work ex cept under certain such as when local officials re quest help Truman May Not Choose Defiance to Run Looks Back at Missouri Senate Seat By EDWIN B HAAKINSON Washington congressional friends of Presi dent Truman said Friday he is seriously considering running for his Old senate seat when his present white house term expires If Harry Truman does what he really wants to do he will run against republican Senator Kern in the 1952 elec tion said one congressman who declined to be quoted by name He really loves the senate Several recent white house callers have privately quoted the president as hinting he will not seek another term They also say he talks longingly about returning to the senate He will have served nearly 8 years in the white house when his present term expires Jan 20 1953 Mr Truman stepped up from the vice presidency April 12 1945 after the sudden death of Presi dent Roosevelt No definite white house an nouncement about the presidents personal plans is expected im mediately Most observers believe he willnot make up his mind to run for another term before early next year and thathis decision will be based in large part upon the condition of world affairs by then Senator Kem expressed no sur prise at the report that the pres ident might decide to oppose him I have no comment Kem told a reporter 1 have not even de cided yet whether I will be a can didate again Gov Forrest Smith a democrat also has been reported as eying Kerns seat Bennie Barone Bound Over in Laurens Bank Job Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Mostly cloudy through Saturday Low Friday night 26 Warmer near 40 Saturday with high Iowa Little change in temper ature Mostly cloudy Fridaj night and Saturday occasiona rain likely extreme west por tion Not much change in tem perature Low Friday night 25 to 30 east 32 to 36 west High Saturday 36 to 42 north 42 to 48 east and southwest Omaha Barone co owner of the Last Chance cafe in Council Bluffs Iowa Friday was bound over to the federal grand jury on charges of receiv ing loot taken last fall from the Laurens Iowa State bank U S Commissioner M O Cun ningham continued bond in the amount of Date for the next grand jury session has not been announced Cunninghams decision to bind the 40yearold Barone to the grand jury came after a hearing featuring the testimony of Pas quale Pat Belcastro 32 of Omaha who has admitted being one of the Laurens burglars Bel castro brought here from Sioux City where he is held awaiting sentence was a government wit ness Wednesday Although Cunningham held there was probable cause for the complaint he acknowledged that no jury would convict him solely on the evidence presented at the preliminary hearing SAME Black flag meant trafrio death in put 24 hours Doomed Family of 6 Worried Most About Menu Further outlook Temperatures Saturday night 28 to 36 Sunday cloudy with above normal tem peratures and indications of in termittent rain continuing treme west Considerable early Sunday High Sunday 40 to 48 Iowa 5Day Weather Outlook Temperatures will average 6 to 10 degrees above normal Nor mal high 35 north 43 south normal low 15 north 21 south Warmer Saturday Continuing above normal until turning a lit tle colder about Wednesday Precipitation will occur as show ers early next week averaging onefourth of an inch Minnesota Cloudy Friday night and Saturday with occasional ram light extreme freezing southwest and rain or drizzle northwest and extreme north Warmer northwest portion Fri day night Low Friday night 1525 north 2332 south High Saturday 2530 north 3236 south IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics for the 24 hours ending at 8 a m Friday Maximum 30 Minimum 23 At 8 a m 26 YEAR AGO Maximum 30 Minimum 15 Spreading By STANLEY RICH Hong Kong UP Commu nist China extending the death penalty drastically Fri day admitted the underground had killed thousands of red militiamen and that open de fiance was spreading an astonishing announce ment Peiping conceded that resistance had risen with the outbreak of fighting in Ko rea Some observers here how ever believed the announce ment was intended primarily to justify a widespread purge which they expect to increase in intensity Death Penalty The reds ordered immediate na tionwide imposition of the death penalty for any andall actions which might be construed as op position to government author ity Observers said that by giving the penalties sanction was trying to taKes6mgrbfttie heat off regional andlpcalgovern ments Dissatisfaction Twith local government wasreported wide spread The Chinese communists in the exPeiping announcement admitted fog that peasant opposition to land re form is spreading rapidly armed defiance to the communism re gime is getting out of control and that thousands of redmilitia and government officials have been killed by counter revolutionary agents Grows Worse The broadcast said the situation had grown worse since the launching of the American inx perialist aggression against Korea It conceded that roving guerrilla sands are destroying railroads and aridges Submitting the stern new pro ram to the central peoples gov ernment council highest ad ninistrative body in red China Deputy Chairman Peng Cheng of the political and law committee declared the government must no onger be magnanimous and len ent If we do not thoroughly de stroy the peoples enemy there cannot be a peoples victory he said If we do not suppress the wolves of America and Chiang Kaishek nationalist bandit groups security and the victory of the people cannot be consoli dated Peng asserted open defiance to the regime is rife throughout the country particularly on the part of repentant persons who had been taken back into the partys good graces By HERB ALTSCHULL Philadelphia ff Most people fear death a few seek it and nearly all wonder about dying Yet the 6 boys in the Baird fam ily all doomed to die of a rare muscular malady are less con cerned with the thought of dying than with the thought of eating The Baird brothers are victims of a muscular dystrophy a disease doctors say is always fatal It is walk up the stairs leading from a first floor grocery to the naked walls of the 4room Baird flat two blocks from the Delaware river front You feel an atmosphere of death Ihere shiver although the air is and musty Them suddenly the spell Is pork fryini and you hear Mrs Baird shout ing to one of her sons to watch that pan or that stuff U burn up and we wont have anything to eat The flat drab though it is means home to William Baird a a week roofets helper his wife Mary 45 one of their two daughters and 5 of their sons ranging in age from 8 to 20 Those 5 and their brother William 21 who lives nearby all suffer from muscular dystrophy Mrs Baird is too busy to think about death Besides the thought of her sons dying is not new For 11 years she has known what to The Bairds dont like to talk about muscular dystrophy To them it is part of their lives and talking about it doesnt change things one whit The boys are being treated Dr Gerald E Pratt of Episcopal hospital one of the few doctors anywhere who devotes nearly all his time to diagonsis treatment and study of muscular dystrophy Dr Pratt said Friday the main reason everyone who gets the disease dies of it is that it has been kicked around and ignored by the medical profession as well as by the general public No one knows how a person gets the disease Muscles be come flabby and eventually stop functioning altogether Then the victim becomes prey to such respiratory diseases as pneumonia and to weak to resist Dr Pratt treats the Baird boys in his clinic at Episcopal hospital a clinic he hopes one day wi grow into a cataloguing and re search center to help ail such sufferers He has been treating the Bairds for some time Eleven years ago the Bairds noticed that their 2nd son Robert now 20 was walking unsteadily They took him to St Chris tophers hospital Doctors there referred the boy to Dr Pratt He promptly diagnosed the disease and warned Mrs Baird that it might strike her other children since the ailment is known to be hereditary Eventually it did Gradually he disease afflicted Walter 17 Richard 16 Charles 14 Joseph 8 and William 21 The Bairds1 two daughters were spared Dr Pratt said the disease rarely af fects women The disease is progressive Muscles weaken by degrees So far only Robert has been so se verely stricken that he cannot walk Charles and Joseph go to school although neither walks steadily But Dr Pratt said it is certain that each of the boys in time will De confined to a wheelchair and at the age of 30 or 35 each will die Can anything be done to save them Not a thing now Dr Pratt answered Experiments have shown that nutrition is somehow associated with the disease and that vitamin E helps tempor arily he said but added it is definitely no cure Only research that finds a cure can help Dr Pratt said Meanwhile what of the Bairds They have moved 5 times in re cent years Once they were evicted for nonpayment of rent A social worker calls regularly to try to help Proud Mrs Baird wants no charity but will accept gifts for the children particularly medicine But so far the good has been all too brief The Bairds sometimes dont know where their next meal is coming from They dont have in clination think about the millions of doliars Dr Pratt considers necessary for research Theyd settle for 3 square meals every day AP Wlrephota MAN emergency hospital doctor is examining Charles S Smith 49 real estate broker cov ered with syrup and feathers at Los Angeles Smith told officers Friday that 3 men kidnaped him held him cap tive for 48 hours robbed him of then syruped and featheredhim 1   

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