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Mason City Globe Gazette: Friday, February 16, 1951 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - February 16, 1951, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME CITY GLOBEGAZETTE TNI NIWSPAPIR THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NIIOHIORS HOME EDITION mint x VOL LVD fnm and United FuU Lww Wire a Copy MASON CITY IOWA FRIDAY FEBRUARY 1C 1951 ThU Pjptr ot Two StcUgiMatcttoa Labor Group WolksOuton Wage Board New Formula Limits Pay Increases to 10 Per Cent By HAROLD W WARD Washington Uncertaint clouded the whole government ef fort to control prices and wages after labor members of the wag stabilization board walked ou Friday in protest over a recom mendation for a 10 per cent cei ing on wage increases By a 6 to 3 vote the board cam forth with a longawaited forraul which would limit wage increases to 10 per cent between Jan 15 1950 and next July 1 Thus workers had already had their pay hiked 8 per cent they woul be held to a two per cent boos until July 1 The 3 public and 3 industry members who approved this formula promised to review th entire wage picture before July and revise it if necessary to kee wages in line with the mountin cost of living Instructed The labor members who ha been holding out for a 12 pe cent ceiling promptly withdrew from the board in protest In ef feet they had been instructed t do so under the circumstances b the united labor policy commit tee a group representing nearl all the 16000000 union member inthe nation They planned to meet with tha committee Friday to conside further appropriate action a Emil Rieve put it Rieve one o the members is president of th C I O United Textile Workers His union called a strike Fridaj by 70000 woolen and worsted mil workers seeking a wage boost The other two labor member are Elmer E Walker president o the machinists union recently re affiliated with the A F L ant President H C Bates of the A F L Bricklayers Actually Bate has been absent from the wag boards long discussions and hi place was taken by John J Mur phy vice president of his union What course organized labp would take was up in the air Rieve denounced the new formu la as unfair and unworkable and it appeared that the labo policy committee would endorsi his stand Free to Strike It it does so and if it declined t suggest the names of substitute labor members for the wage board speculation was that the entir setup would have to be revised Without labor representation un lojs might feel freer to strike to back up wage demands than i they had a direct hand in fixing policy It appeared possible the gov ernment would have to scrap the present 3 part board which is headed by Cyrus S Ching and substitute for it a panel of mem bers all designated as represent ing the public That would take time and because prices cannot effectively be controlled unless wages are too might jeopardize the whole program The impact of the splitup was not made any the less severe by the fact that the wage boards policy is only a recommendation which still must be approved by Stabilization Director Eric John ston Klemesrud Bill to Stop Unfair College Practices Des Moines P Rep Theo Klemesrud RThompson intro duced in the Iowa house Friday a bill to halt what he described as an unfair practice by some of the colleges The measure provides that any college credits earned by a student holding a scholarship would be transferrable to any other col lege at any time Klemesrud said he knew of two colleges which have refused to transfer credits earned on scholar ships unless tuition is paid for the time the student held the scholar ship He added that he has received reports that several other colleges also have adopted a similar policy Klemesrud explained that these colleges do not include any state supported institutions of higher learning FOR JUDGES EXPENSE Des Moines bill which would pay Iowa supreme court justices the same expense allow ances as now go to district court judges was recommended to the house Friday for indefinite post ponement SAMB mttto M Allied Bayonets Face Chinese Flanking Drive on Two Fronts GlobeGazette photo by Sorlien ITS the slide at Central school was slick friclay and that isnt usually true this time of year Stephen Twito son of Mr and Mrs Earl Twito 226 7th N E found out that landing on his feet wasnt as easy as usual However Stephen didnt mind the fall quite as much as some of his elders did when they hit the ice Friday morning Transportation Slides and Most Schools Close Transportation slipped to a crawl Friday on highways in Iowa and southernMinnesota as freezing rain covered streets highways and sidewalks with ice The Iowa highway patrol recommended that no vehicles ase the roads Friday All buses scheduled to leave Des Moines were cancelled How ever some buses were leaving Mason City Weather forecasters said the torm which came out of the outhwest after crippling Texas Oklahoma and Missouri slack ened as it spread into Iowa Illi nois Wisconsin and Minnesota Some relief was indicated in Wason City as the mercury hit above at 8 a m Friday the lighest since Sunday The weather closed schools at ludd Hansell Nashua Floyd Uceville Osage Lincoln No 2 ickley Swaledale Orchard Lime teek No 7 Thornton Marble 12Inch Snow aralyzes Tokyo Tokyo white snow flakes paralyzed something allied fire and demo lition bombs failed to do in the Pacific war Eight persons were dead and 83 injured in the TokyoYoko hama area as 12 inches of snow fell Kyodo news agency report ed Sixtysix fishermen were listed as Thirtythree fishing boats were sunk and 66 others washed from moorings Fourteen U S naval ships were grounded by high winds at Yokosuka naval base but 13 were refloated and back in service The 14th the Badoeng Strait was expected to be re floated Friday The 4928ton Swedish motor vessel Chrlster Salen her bow snapped off in raging seas 100 miles off the east coast was being towed to Yokohama Res cue vessels reported her 10 pas sengers and 37 crewmen safe Tokyos snowfall was the heaviest since the record ot 14 inches Feb 261936 Everything in this city of 5000000 stopped Wednesday night when the storm struck Streets are still closed by the snow Most sidewalks are blocked Stores are closed Lights are out in many sections The gas is off in others Street cars remain dead in their tracks Trains are far be hind schedule and in some places are not running ock Carpenter Klemme iitchell Franklin Consolidated ora Springs Goodell Chapin lexander Hubbard rural and Lake No 4 There was school but no buses t Charles City Sheffield Hamp on Iowa Falls and Britt In Mason City local buses were unning Friday morning but some ties in Iowa stopped even local us service However buses be ween Mason City and Clear Lake were not scheduled to tun until the ice began to break up MidContinent airlines reported Friday that although no planes had arrived by 9 a m flights were still pending Five deaths were attributed to the weather in Texas alone The ice cap that covered most of the state was expected to melt bul communications were knocked out in at least 43 towns The icy crust will be slower to disappear in Oklahoma and Mis souri forecasters said Eight inches of icfe pellets and snow glued together with freezing rain piled up in Oklahoma City and 3 inches in Kansas City SELL GERMAN EMBASSY Washington Cafritz a Washington real estate man and builder has bid5101050 for the old German embassy one time home of the kaisers and Hitlers diplomats Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Freezing rain and snow ending Friday evening Cloudy Friday night with low near 24 Clearing and warmer Saturday with high 42 Iowa Rain and snow ending in west Friday afternoon Little change in temperature Mostly cloudyFriday night but rain or show continuing into the eve ning in northeast portion Sat urday generally fair and warm er Low Friday night 24 to 28 High Saturday 42 to 47 Further outlook Fair and mild Sunday with low 20 to 26 and high near 50 Iowa 5day weather outlook Temperatures will average 4 to 8 degrees above normal Nor mal highs 33 to 42 Normal lows 14 to22 Slow upward trend until turning colder around Tuesday Little or no precipita tion after Friday until one fourth to onehalf inch of rain or snow about Tuesday Minnesota Cloudy light snow or freezing rain southeast and ex treme east Friday night not so cold north portion Saturday clearing and warmer Low Fri day night 2025 high Saturday 3642 IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics or the 24 hours ending at 8 a m Maximum Minimum At 8 a m Precipitation YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum 23 1 29 12 21 1 FBI Knew Kitts Wore a Disguise Omaha UR The FBI agent who nabbed Kenneth Kitts says federal agents expected to find the 33yearold fugitive just where they did Agent James L Dalton said we had good reason to believe that Kitts was in an Omaha tourist court Dalton spoke Thursday before a business group here He said the FBI knew that Kitts had grown a mustache and dyed his hair red But he said the FBI ran down a lot of false leads during the Kitts chase also Dalton said there were literally hundreds Kitts escaped from the Linn county jail at Cedar Rapids Iowa Jan 22 and was caught here 17 days later He now faces bank robbery and escape charges in Iowa The Nebraska supreme court also upheld an earlier 12 year burglary sentence which he must serve Dalton said he could hot dis close details of the Kitts chase Thats trade secret and were in business to stay he said RECORD SORTIES Tokyo east air forces planes topped the 1000sortiej mark Thursday for the 1st time in the5 Korean war The record of more than 1025 sorties included a record 700plus combat flights by U S 5th air force fighters and bombers DiSalle Asks for Farmer CoOperation Des Moines Stabili zer Michael V DiSalle bid Friday for farmer cooperation in con trolling prices and battling infla tion At the same time he warned that if the parity concept inter feres with our efforts to secure econorrjc stability we shall have no other course than to recom mend its modification Agriculture Vital DiSalle was a principal speaker at the 13th annual National Farm Institute a forum sponsored by the Des Moines Chamber xf Com merce to probe the part of Amer ican agriculture in building free world Recalling that parity and other government moves for stabilizing farm economy were based on the principle that a strong agriculture is vital to national strength anc security the price stabilizer said it followed that when govern mental controls are applied to the entire economy certain controls will be applied to agricultural products Parity is the formula set by law to assure that farmers get enough from sale of their products to give them a fair break on things they buy Prices of farm commodities below parity were exempt from the recent government freeze Doubtful Trend DiSalle said there was now some doubt that further increases in the cost of food and agricultural products would be an incentive to further production or would simply build up additional infla tionary pressure Unless food prices are held rela tively stable he added there is an impetus to higher and higher wage rates Higher wages he contended in turn force up the price of manufactured products and indi rectly bring higher farm prices Chinese Casualties No Signal for Glee Des Moines war corres pondent advised his listeners Fri day not to expect too much from the tremendous casualties being inflicted on the Chinese in the orean war They can take such casualties indefinitely Relman Pat Morin Associated Press special corres pondent declared at the opening session of the National Farm In stitute The only hope now is for a po litical settlement in Korea said Morin who was in Korea and Japan from July to December He said the onrush of Chinese communists has ended chances for any clear cut military decision there He added that the Chinese reds could push UN troops from Korea if they want to spend the manpower ITALIAN FILM BANNED Albany N Y New York board of regents Friday in voked a statewide ban against the Italian film The Miracle on the ground that it is sacrilegious Talk of AntiStalin Party Among Italian Communists By HARRY FERGUSON United Press Foreign News Editor Balance sheet for the week be tween good and bad news in the hot and cold wars Good News 1 A fairly heavy enemy punch at the middle of the UN line in Korea was contained this week The Chinese communists were seeking a weak spot that would open the way for a major break through but they didnt find it Our lines bent but didnt break and the U S air force saved the day by dropping supplies to iso lated units 2 Russias troubles with her satellite nations and the commu nist parties inside the western de mocracies increased There is a surge underway in Czechoslovakia vhich has affected the army and the civilian government The re volt of Italian communists against dictation from Moscow became more serious and there was talk that an antiStalin communist party would be formed 3 The U S 8th army in Korea was having considerable success n achieving its prime he killing of communists Gen Douglas MacArthur reported that since the Chinese communist of ensive started on ratio of casualties Monday between the the UN army and the enemy has ranged from one to 10 to as high as one to 30 Bad News 1 It looks like a long war in Korea unless someone can pro duce a negotiated settlement The communist superiority in man power is just about cancelled out by the 8th armys superiority in firepower Both sides have made limited gains in the last 3 weeks but neither one can deliver the crushing blow that would lead to a rout 2 Russia is busy regrouping her own and the satellite armies in move that could mean she is planning a strike against he west in the spring It could se nothing more than a war of nerves to try to prevent the western Germans from rearming but anything that delays the for mation of Gen Dwight D Eisen howers army is bad news for the west 3 China shows no sign of try ing to get out of the Korean war and cut her losses Shortly after the central front offensive was repulsed Thursday word came from the battlefield that the en emy was massing for a Apparently the Chinese reds are planning to hit this time with about 120000 men South Korean Regiment Holds Off 2OpO Reds By OLEN CLEMENTS Tokyo bayonets slashed back red attempt to outflank both ends of the central Korean warfront Fri day On the left flank southeast of Seoul American infan out of bayonets an charged They chased the fleeing Chinese survivors hal a mile The doughboys killed some 56 reds Artillery alread had killed about 100 of dugin force of 300 Pressure On On the right flank of the relatively quiet central front South Korean infantrymen used bayonets and grenades to throw back Chinese troops north of Che chon But communist pressure in that mountainous sector continued On the western front south of Seoul an American tankinfantry patrol ran into more than 500 Chi nese just south of the Han river The reds were dug in but lost at least 100 men Action all along the battlefront was relatively small in compari son with fighting in the past 5 days in which a communist drive on the central front was checked Casualties Heavy The 8th army counted red cas ualties at 4935 for Thursday of which 2275 were on trie central front between Chipyong and Won ju This brought to more than 100000 the red losses since the allied limited offensive jumped off Jan 25 Fridays action on the right flank of the central front indi cated the Chinese may have shif ted much of their strength to the area north and northwest of Che chon The flanking development came after a chipsdown battle at Chip yong 20 air miles northwest of Wonju Allied reinforcements bolstered the fingerinthedike force of French and Americans at Chipyong that badly crippled 3 Chinese divisions in cheeking the main red push on the central front earlier this week StandOff To the east of Chipyong an AmericanDutch force stood off massing red forces above Wonju Some of those communists were believed to have taken to the high ridges in the southeast to threaten Chechen The reds had no artillery support in their new threat But a menacing buildup of Chinese and Korean red forces was the hills and val leys above the central area beyond Chipyong and Wonju AP Correspondent John Ran dolph reported 8th army intelli gence estimated the red strength at 5 army corps A Chinese army corps consists of 3 divisions of from 6000 to 10 000 men in each division Hence up to 150000 troops could be massing for a new onslaught on the central front Southeast of Chipyong where some 2000 reds had forced th last link of a around the hill ringed town British Scottish an Australian troops ran into a ho fight and failed to reach Chipypni However tank led America troops got there Thursday nigh They were greeted by cheerin French and American doughboy who had put up one of the game battles of the war to whip super ior odds 90000 Casualties Littered between Chipyong an Wonju were more than 2000 enemy casualties inflicted in days by the central front defender and the more than 1000 sorties o allied planes against them Thurs day Sporadic fighting was reporte on the central front Friday Cor respondent Randolph said durin the night allied troops heard th Chinese digging in Intelligenc reports indicated the battered red were regrouping Allied troops in the west sti held Port Inchon Youngdunp and Kimpo airport in the Seou area The ravaged South Korea capital itself was under artiller fire from U N guns 13YearOld Prodigy Develops TV Color Cleveland 13 year ol boy prodigy said Friday the d tails for a color television proce he invented are too technical describe to the public Franklin Porath junior big school student who has been stud ing science for 6 or 7 years waiting for a reply from the Pola roid corporation of America on th merits of his plan which he say is cheaper than any now in use The boy said he had written letter to the Polaroid corporation offeringto explain his idea if th firm would send a man to look a it He said the company wrol back asking him to send detai and drawings by registered mail and to protect his interest in hi invention by having witnesse sign the plans MACHINERY EXEMPTION Des Moines to the house Friday for passag was a bill to exempt from taxatior the farm machinery owned by ar individual who goes into th armed forces and whose equip rnent is not used while he is gone AP Wlrcphoto ARMY DOESNT WANT George Raymundo Jr bottom right is a good soldier all right but he is only 13 years old He gave his age as 18 when he enlisted without the knowledge of his parents The army an nounced at Aberdeen Proving Grounds Md it will give George an honorable discharge on Monday With him above are left to Pvt Gene Ficrentino Brook lyn N Y C Pipkin Mena Ark and Pvt John Russell Bronx N Y Allies Seen Doubling Defenses Washington rf State Dean Acheson declared Friday that it would be cut to suicide not to rush owre American troops to Europe now If the United States fails to bolster western European ground defenses against soviet aggres sion he said we might again hear the bitter refrain Too little and too late Washington If Secretary of State Acheson said Friday the combat forces of our European allies may be expected to double in the next year He gave no figures in prepared testimony calling upon the senate foreign relations and armed serv ices committees to support the Truman administrations plan to send 100000 additional United States troops to Europe to bolster defenses against communist ag gression Acheson said the United States must use the time it vir tue of its lead over Russia in air power and atomic build up with its allies balanced collective forces needed to deter aggression Loss Offset He added that the value of our lead in atomic weapons will de cline but he said balanced land sea and air forces in western Eu rope will help offset the loss of that advantage Acheson said Americas allies are now taking steps which bring us measurably closer to realization of our ultimate goal of an ade quate defense force Roughly speaking he went on the combat forces of our Euro pean allies may be expected to double in the next year Secretary of Defense George Marshall told the committees Thursday of the plan to send to Europe 4 more American divi sions about 100000 men includ ing supporting troops to re enforce the two already in Ger many Smaller Offer Marshalls disclosure of the def inite figures took much of the steam out of the opposition in the troopstoEurope controversy The size of the forces contemplated was smaller than had been an ticipated But Senator Taft wants to put some kind of a limit on the number of troops to be sent was ready with a lot of cjues tions for Acheson Whether he would get a chance to ask them in person was in doubtSince Taft is not a member of either commit tee he would have to get special permission from members of both groups Taft told reporters he wanted to know particularly whether there was any agreement on the size of the ground forces to be furnished by each of the North Atlantic pact nations If no ceiling is imposed on the American troop contribu tion Taft said he might propose that none be sent until western European nations agree formally o take on most of the defense Burden Marshall had opposed setting any limit on the size of the Ameri can contingent President Truman said later Marshalls statement represented the white house views Hickenlooper in Sharp Questioning Washington Secretary of tate Acheson and Senator Hick enlooper RIowa got into a harp exchange Friday over what Acheson said in 1949 about U S roops and the defense of Europe In April 1949 the senate for jgn relations committee was con idering the north Atlantic treaty Acheson was in the witness chair Hickenlooper asked whether the United States was expected to end substantial numbers of roops to Europe under the pact n advance of any attack Achesons answer was no Friday with Acheson back be ore the committee on the troops oEurope issue Hickenlooper ontended that Achesons 1949 nswer was the basis on which he treaty was sold to a great many members of congress Had it not been for that answer Hickenlooper said there would ave been reservations proposed 3 assure that congress would ass on the question before any round troops were sent to Eu ope Acheson said if he had thought 1949 that Hickenlooper had in mind getting a prediction as to le future I certainly would not ave been so didactic as I was in lat answer He said his answer was directed the point there was no com mitment in the treaty for the nited States to send ground xoops Mason CityFort Dodge Basketball Twin Bill ostponed to Saturday The scheduled doubleheader for lason City and Fort Dodge high hoot and junior college basket all teams at Fort Dodge Friday ght has postponed and will played Saturday night V   

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