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Mason City Globe Gazette: Wednesday, February 7, 1951 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - February 7, 1951, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER FOR THE HOME VOL LVD Associated united Pi MASON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE THI NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS N11 G H I 0 R S MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 7 1851 Cents a Copy This Paper CotuiiU of Two On HOME EDITION UUlif T 113 Crash Train Engineer Admits Speeding Reds Dig In on River Banks to Defend Seoul Artillery of Allies Covers City nTrm cimnirnm T T i blobeGazette photo by Sorlien DIG OUT STREET on the deadend road north of Clear Lake state park had a job of shoveling to do before they could get cars put to the highway Wednes day They are shoveling a 6foot qrjft in the center of the street The 40mile an hour northwest wind piled snow to the roofs of thehomes oil the southeast shore after sweeping across the frozen surface of the lake Mercury Drops 43 Degrees 40 Mile Wind Pihs Drifts Residents of Mason City brace themselves against a 40 mile an hour wind out of the horthtwes Wednesday morning on thetail o its worst blizzard of the winter The temperature was 12 degree below zero at 8 a m the coldes it reached in a 43 degree drop from 31 above early Tuesday There was but a trace of snov Tuesday night but the wind cu visibility almost to zero during th night and Tuesdays 4inch snow fall drifted badly Skies were clear sunny and cold Wednesday morn ing There was drifting all across thi northern section of the state anc at Clear Lake the snow driftec as high as the houses on the south shore of the lake 52 Schools Closed In north central Iowa 52 schools were closed for the day and 10 others did not send out their buses The North Iowa band clinic to be held at Forest City was postponed until a later date and the Kensett firemens ball was postponed from Tuesday until Friday night nigh Schools were closed Wednesday at Osage Rockford Rudd Rake Scarville Ventura Grafton Solan Floyd Lincoln township 7 Lincoln township 5 Lincoln township 2 Mclntire Marble Rock Hanlon town Thompson Mitchell Or chard Lake township 7 Chapin Elma Carpenter Kensett Nora Springs Ledyard St Ansgar Hansell SiceviUe Rock Falls Little Cedar Plymouth Greene Titonka Fer tile Joice Buffalo Center Pleas ant Valley school in Mitchell coun ty Parkcrsburg Britt Rockwell Sacred Heart academy at Rock well Mejservey Mt Vernon 5 and 1 Emory Lake 5 Grant 6 Klem me Thornton Hayfield Lake No 4 Swaledaie and Emmons Minn School was in session but the busses were not running at Lake Mills Sheffield Woden North wood Lakota Forest City Nashua Garner Manly and Charles City Roads Slippery The state highway patrol re ported slippery roads in Iowa north of a line through Denison Des Maines and Davenport Roads in an 8 county area around Mason City are listed as 50 per cent snow packed The southeast corner of the state is normal Thelatest report from the state highway patrol showed roads open in all sections of the state Some oneway traffic is reported on highways in the northeast and drifting continues in that area The Union bus station in Des Moines cancelled its a m bus to the north The a m bus over that route for Mason City left Des Moines on schedule It uras 5 below in Des Moines Report One Death The weather is listed as a con tributing factor in at least one death Will Otto a tank truck driver from Cedar Falls was the Victim The coroner said he died of a heart attack and that the in tense was probably a con tributing factor The truck went off highwajr 63 about 3 miles north of Wateri0o new cold wave speared down the Mississippi valley to the Gulf of Mexico and fanned across the country from the Rockies to the Appalachians Residents of the northern plains shiverecjn temperatures far be low zer0 and the morning sub zero iirie dipped into Nebraska Iowa and Illinois Cold wave warnings were is South Koreans Break Through on Central Front From Press Dispatches United Nations forces smashed within sight of Seoul Wednesday on the heels of red troops falling back to the last communist defense line south of the former Korean capital American Turkish and Puerto Rican infantry shoved the 8th armys western front up to within 6 miles of Seoul in advances of 4 miles or more Scrambling over slippery scrub covered ridges the allied riflemen seized mountain peaks within sight of the city Only the smoke of batle obscured the tall build ings of Seoul Eighth army artil lery also moved north and brought all Seoul within its range Reinforcements Dig In But air observers said massive Chinese and North Korean rein forcements were digging in along the new and final defense line covering both sides of the Han river just below Seoul Every available hill on the 6 mile stretch from the UN front to1 the embattled city was studded with foxholes and gun emplace ments Some 10000 to 15000 red soldiers were believed massed southwest of Seoul alone Two raider tank columns smashed through mine fields and rearguard roadblocks for a link up miles southwest of Seoul Hundreds of enemy troops were trapped and slain The heavy allJed pounding mounting with intensity each day cracked the main commu nist defense line south of Seoul Planks were strung across the Han Temporojv Overposs Afosf People tn This Car WHERE AND HOW DEATH CAME TO Here is a diagrammed airview taken Wednesday of the sued for Ohio Kentucky Tennes see West Virginia and Pennsyl vania and winters newest blast YaiS ePected to hit almost all the Atlantic seaboard by Thursday DRIVING WORST OF YEAR river ice in places to enable the Chinese to rush tanks troops and supplies to their hardhit 50th army Take Strong Point Chicago Still Tied Up as Strike Eases BULLETIN By the Associated Press A federal judge hearing a contempt charge against rail road strikers declared Wednes day switchmen have challenged U S sovereignty and that army officers should be running the railroads Judge Michael L Igoe made this observation from the bench in Chicago By The Associated Press costly the nations railroad transporta tion appeared to be easing Wed nesday as more striking switch men joined in the backto wor movements which started Tues day However there was not a full BUS DBivER REPORTS A bus driver who left res Moines for Minne Tuesday night was back in Jes Moihes Wednesday to tell of the worst driving conditions of he trampton Minneapolis a driver the Jefferson Bus line said his bus Was stopped at Ma ion City on its trip north There was nothing moving north of there he related Wed nesday it Was pretty bad with ce drifted snow and not too much visibility but there was very little traffic which helped me immensely he said He said he met only 3 vehicles in the highway between here and Mason i car and 2 trucks Report FORECAST Mason City Clear and cold Wed nesday night Thursday partly cloudy and warmer Southeast erly wfads Thursday Low Wed nesday night 15 below high Thursqay 10 above not quite so cold extreme West Wednesday night Thursqay increasing cloudiness with nsing temperatures South erly Vfjjds 1015 MPH Thurs dayIjow Wednesday night 5 above west 5 to 10 below ex treme east High Thursday 20 to 25 extreme west 10 to 15 ex treme east Further outlook Low Thursday night 5 to 15 above Friday partly cloudy somewhat warmer southeast half high 27 to 29 Minnesota Fair and Wednes day night Thursday increasing cloudirtess rising tempera light snow beginning tures in afternoon or night Low Wednesday night 2025 below orth 515 below south High Thursday near zero north 10 above south IN MASON CITY Globegazette weather statistics or the 2t hours ending at 8 a m Maximum 19 Minimim 12 At 8 a m 12 trace Allied units captured a well defended hill two miles northwest of the deserted village of Anyang With loss of their strongpoint the reds were forced to pull back toward the Han The weather was growing so warm that doughboys shed their parkas If it gets much warmer the reds south of the Han will have a thawedout river at their back That would hamper a re treat All bridges across the river are down One allied tank force found a big force of the Chinese 50th army behind antitank minefields around Mt Choggye 5i miles south Of the Han Suicide squads of Chinese who were to detonate the mines fled as scale return across the countvj marking the end of the sick call walkout which started on Jan 30 Indications were that the cripplin weeklong stoppage was nearin an end in most parts of the coun try the allied tanks American soldiers rumbled detonated up the mines and the tank force rolled through Its blazing guns caught the reds on hillsides and in their foxholes Smash Through Center The allied gain in the came simultaneously with a big break through by a South Korean force straight up the center of the Ko rean peninsula The South Ko reans smashed a massing force of red Koreans and were still moving 25 miles south of parallel farther north than redheld Seoul to the west On the east coast a smaller al lied force worked in the vicinity of Kangnung where the American battleship Missouri and an allied naval task force Tuesday battered the area with big guns Kungnung is just 17 miles south of parallel 38 the old boundary between North and South Korea Sow Roofing Nails The British cruiser Belfast and he American heavy cruiser St Paul and the destroyer Hank poured shells at reds in the In chonSeoul sector While the ground forces blazed away at the communists on both he central and western fronts al lied warplanes dived in and out among the towering mountains bombing and strafing the enemy The U S 5th air force sowed major roads with roofing nails that punctured truck tires and left the bogged down communist trucks to the mercy of strafing planes AP Correspondent Tom Stone reported the 3776000 nails Several bright spots appeared on the troubled rail front follow ing the first major break Tuesda when thousands of switchmen re turned to work Service was normal on major lines in the New York and New England areas It was near norma in many other cities And man carriers expressed hope for nor mal service soon as the backto work movement spread from city to city Dark Spots But there were some dark spots too in the overall picture There were a couple of new although small walkouts And noi many trains were moving in some of the key rail centers notably Chicago St Louis and Cleveland Switchmen were returning in the Twin Cities The Milwaukee road there had 15 or 20 men on hand at the start of the day shift The Burlington force of 58 report ed they were ready for duty The Minnesota Transfer company a switching service said it was vir tually backto normal An army spokesman said the situation in Chicago U S trans portation hub was not too good His check of 18 railroads in Chi cago showed no switchmen were on the job in 8 of them There were only partial forces on the others The percentages ranged from only 1 of 165 on the Santa Fe to 54 of 183 on the Burlington and 168 of 912 on the Elgin Joliet Eastern Los Angeles Improved At Los Angeles all Southern Pacific midnight crews were back at work The Union Pacific reported op erations were on a normal scale in Kansas City Los Angeles Las Vegas Salt Lake City and Ogden Utah and Topeka Kans but the workers still were put in Green River and Rock Springs Wyo All switchmen were back on duty on the New York Central Erie and Pennsylvania lines in Buffalo N Y Southern Pacific yardmen were returning slowly at Yuma Tucson and Phoenix Ariz At Cleveland the Efie railroad had only 1 of 18 switchmen at work and it canceled two more passenger trains The Nickel Plate there had 24 of 37 switchmen on duty and the New York Central had 33 of a normal 150 The Pittsburgh and West Vir ginia railroad a key coal carrier dropped resulted in an air force clamped a total embargo on ship bag of 84 enemy trucks the Istimenfs The reason was a wave of for 118 conductors and brakemen failed to bring out a single crew The delay in a full return to delayed the recall of thou sands of workers in railrelatec industries More than 250000 had been made idle in the last week because of the rail work stoppage An estimated 100000 auto work ers remained idle across the coun try Wednesday despite some im provement in the rail situation General Motors said it still had about 75000 on the layoff list a 26 plants after 13000 were called back to their jobs in half a dozen other G M factories Ford reported its idleness tola at 10250 This was the same as Tuesday with the addition of 2200 at its Edgewater N J plant Nashs 14000 workers at two Wisconsin plants remained idle Auto manufacturers continued to be pessimistic about production prospects Studebaker said i would start a progressive layoff o 12750 employes at the end of Wednesdays shift Pfc Chavez Is Missing Korea in Pfc Albert J Chavez son of Mr and Mrs Leon Vega 1421 Quincy V W has been missing in action n Korea since Jan 20 according o a telegram from the defense department received by his par ents here Tuesday night No other information was given except that the family would be notified later when further in ormation was received About a iveek ago the parents of the miss ng man received a letter written he day before he was reported missing Pfc Chavez was attached to the 7th infantry regiment in Korea enlisted in California last July He is a graduate of Pasadena City ollege a junior college Acheson Soys Satellites Build Tension Washington State Acheson Wednesday accuse the iron curtain countiesRus ciac catollitoclnf causes o in Wirephoto scene of Tuesday night s tragic tram wreck train left the rails while crossing a temporary overpass And Candy Fell From His Pockets By STAN OPOTOWSKY Perth Amboy N J UR A man stumbled dazedly through the door of the coroners office On his forehead was an ugly red wound There was blood on his face He wobbled as he said my wife she was sitting next to me on the train I have this He held up a battered pocketbqok A friend steadied him with a reassuring Hand tod said Bill do you want the priest to go in with you to her Yes well maybe er yes And the 3 walked through the inner door to view the mangled horrors within Nurse Sobs Too A nurse sobbed convulsively in the corner of the waiting room an elderly grayhaired man at her side She had rushed from rescue work to identify her own husband Coroner Samuel Kain showed her an of the en velopes that contain the pitiful remains of wallets used to identify the dead But she stammered can we be sure The coroner turned to her elder ly male companion and asked do you think you can stand it He nodded They through that door The wife waited She sobbed to lerself We looked all over be ore we came here He always raveled This is the 1st time any thing happened He Nodded Yes Her friend came back Through ear dimmed eyes and choking sobs he nodded yes Slowly they went out together And so it went through to the dawn sia s very great armies in excess peace treaty limitations He sa this is one of f world tension Acheson told a news conferenc it is the weight of armie plus the enormous military pom of the Soviet Union whic isthe prime source of tension an worry in the world todav He agreed when a reporter sug gested that the military buildu by Romania Bulgaria and Hun gary in excess of war peace treaty limits well be considered at the propose meeting of the big 4 min isters Note Grudging PFC ALBERT J CHAVEZ 574 CASUALTIES IN WEEK Washington U combat casualties in Korea eached 47388 Wednesday an in crease of 574 in a week DIMAG GETS New York DiMaggio tar cenlerfielder of the New York ankees signed his 3rd straight oag ui enerny HULKS me isi merus me reason was a wave iu annees sigiwa ms oru sira day and nifht of operation tack rsiclt ness among switchmen Calls contract Wednesday Inside the morgue the bodies were lined up head to foot in 3 or 4 rooms Ambulance squads brought them in in batches You could see the victims dirty ihoes and stockinged feet and bloody legs sticking over the edges of the stretchers There were sobbing women out ide the door who in tearsasked he emergency squad man if he knew the names of anyone inside No I hope no one I know is in there one woman said Everybody knew it was a com muter train You could tell from the bodies as they were brought in Newspapers were still folded in the overcoat pockets of some of the men When one man was brought in a paper bag filled with candy probably for his children spilled its contents on the spat tered floor Acheson said that though Russia had moved somewh grudgingly toward such a meetin in the last soviet note tq the wesl ern powers At the same time he describe as usual communist Propagand otlier peopl with what they do Russias claim that thg western nations are bringing aggressiv militarist elements in German back into power At the news Ache son also 1 Confirmed that u 5 is negotiating for the right to use various military bases jn North Africa and the Middle East He would not give any detaiis as to number or location Pacific Pact 2 Declared the subject of a Pa cific pact is one which naturally comes up in connection with a HOUSE VOTES RECESS DCS Moines The Iowa house Wednesday adopted a sen ate resolution calling for a legisla tive recess Feb 23 to March 5 The recess is taken every session about March 1 to enable farmers attorneys and others to handle special business which comes up March 1 Japanese peace treaty Acheson added that he assumes the matter will be fully discussed by Am bassador John Foster Cur ing his current treaty negotiations in Tokyo He said the U g policy toward the idea of such a pact is at present one of ness 3 Asserted contrary to charges in the Moscow rlewspaper Pravda the U S has qone what it could to make a success Of pres ent lendlease settlement negotia tions with Russia Pravda had charged the U S was sabotaging the talks underway here Acheson said this is plainly untrut that the only reason there are negotiations is the great patience shovn by the U S in dealing with Russian ne gotiators House Committee Approves Senate AntiGambling Bill DCS Moines house will debate the passed antigambling Toll Rises to 82 500 Are Injured FBI Is Checking Possibility of Sabotage dn Line Woodbridge N J Au thorities said Wednesday that a crack commuter train was travel ing twice its authorized speed when it roaredoff the rails here Tuesday night killing 82 persons Approximately 500 others were injured in the death dealing wreck worst in more than a quar ter century Middlesex county Assistant Pro secutor Alex Aber conducting one of a half dozen investigations said the train was highballing at 50 miles an hour when it plunged off a newly built trestle He said that the trains engi neer Joseph Fitzsimmons inter viewed in his hospital bed had admitted he was traveling this speed although the railroad had ordered a 25mile per hour limit over the trestle section Fitzsimmon was quoted as say ing he had slowed down from 60 miles an hour but had not fur ther retarded his speed because he found no caution signal FBI Investigates In Newark the FBI said it was investigating to determine wheth er sabotage was involved The railroad conducting its own probe said it could offer no im mediate explanation for the cause of the wreck Throughout the night and far into Wednesday rescue workers hacked through the twisted mass of wreckage They said other bodies still may be found in the crumpled coaches and debris The 11car Pennsylvania rail road train The Broker swerved wildly and jumped the tracks as it sped on to the rnidtown over pass The ears jackknifing crazily hurtled down a 20foot The new temporary overpass had been put in service only a few hours before the crash The dead included bankers lawyers and businessmen prom inent in their localities and civic life most of them homebound from New York City offices Pour Unidentified The list of known dead stood at 79 with 3 bodies stiE uniden tified The rushhour crackup was the worst in the nation since 1918 when 115 were killed in a Nash ville Term wreck and more dis astrous than a 1943 accident out side Philadelphia that took 80 ives It was Iow senate as a SAME Blxk U tnttit talk special order of business Feb 14 The house Wednesday set tha date for the measure whicn woulc revoke all business licenses Of an establishment possessing gambling devices The socalled Minnesota law won a recommendation for pas sage by the house com mittee No 2 The senatfe passed the bill 463 last Jan 31 after a lengthy series of debates Although the bill g known as a copy of the Minnesota law which struck primarily at slot machines it goes considerably further in designating tyhat are gambling devices the 3rd major1 train wreck in the metropolitan area in ess than a year A total of near y 200 died in the 3 crackups In Washington the interstate commerce commission ordered an nquiry into the new disaster with a public hearing to open Thurs day On orders of New Jersey Gov Alfred E Driscoll the states at orney general Theodore Parsons Iso began an investigation He eached the scene early Wednes ay and sent an assistant to a lospital to question the critically njured engineer of the wrecked rain Aisles Jammed It was loaded to the aisles with omebound commuters mostly rom New their way to led Bank Long Branch Asbury ark and other communities on few Jerseys wealthy north shore Engineer Joseph H Fitzsimmons veteran of 33 accidentfree years n the road blamed the over rowded coaches and the new restle for the tragedy Alive but injured the 57year Id Fitzsimmons said from a hos ital cot The moment my engine passed ver the trestle and lurched sharp I felt the rest of the cars would ever make it I hit the trestle at about 25 liles per hour and the speed of he train certainly couldnt be amed for the crash When I arted to sway I applied the rakes but it apparently was too te Disagree with Engineer Passengers and at least one rail ed did not give s with the en neer on the speed of the train the detective said it was going at top speed when it hit the trestle The Pennsylvania in a state ment said a 25mile an hour speed limit was in effect on the new track opened to traffic less than 5 hours before The Broker cracked up The hew track was swung about 50 feet from the old one to clear he way for the Jersey turnpike big crossstate highway now under construction The Pennsylvania said 6 trains lad passed over the new trestle safely before The Broker The railroad said the trestle it self was not a factor in the the engineers statt ment Gov Alfred E Driscoll   

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