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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: February 2, 1951 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - February 2, 1951, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME MASON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS HOME EDITION MASON CITY DOLLAR DAYS Fridoy and Saturday VOL LV1I Associated Press and United Press Full Lease Win rive Ce MASON CITY IOWA FRIDAY FEBRUARY 2 1951 Tbis Paper Consists ol Two One n Truman Asks 10 Billion Boost in Taxes Tanks Miles South of Seoul Report Outbreak of Typhus Trench Foot Among Korean Reds By OLEN CLEMENTS Tokyo allied as sault forces advanced through thick fog Friday night to points north of Anyang which is only 8i miles south of redheld Seoul Two to 24 miles south of An yang however 2 companies of Chinese communists possibly 400 men counterattacked at 10 p m and still were fighting at mid night No details were available on this relatively small red effort to check the United Nations drive which has gained about 20 miles since it began Jan 25 Enemy op position has been slackening daily Advance patrols of the allies have been reported only 7 miles from Seoul Forces Move Up Heavier forces are moving up cautiously wary against flank at tacks which are the favorite red tactics An 8th army spokesman esti mated that 6650 Chinese and North Korean communists had been killed by ground action be tween Jan 25 and 31 Air reports listed casualties for that period at 1442 but some may be duplica tions Even so there was a difference of military opinion as to whether the allies have cracked the main enemy defenses despite notable losses in manpower and shrink ing morale among the reds In Washington there were re ports that high officials have de cided UN troops should stop at parallel 38 presumably pending further efforts toward political of the conflict An 8th army spokesman de clihed to confirm or deny the Resistance Slackens Chopped up are the Chinese SOth and 38th armies Resistance was slackened even though the communist 39th and 40th armies reserve allied are in immediate commanders said Beliable sources said the ghast ly threat of typhus has made its appearance among North Korean and that tuberculosis a toll among the Chinese troops trench foot frostbite and other diseases likewise were taking Allies Prisoners of war said 50 to 100 per cent of some North Korean companies are infected with ty phus a disease transmitted by vermin from rats However U S 8th army investigators said there was no evidence that Chinese troops have been affected serious ly by the disease UN Troops Inoculated No typhus cases were reported among inoculated TIN troops Army officials in Washington said Russian satellite countries have had difficulty perfecting an ef fective vaccine On the allied right flank near the juncture of western and cen tral fronts French and American elements smashed their way out of a trap set by thousands of screaming communists who leaped wildly into handtohand combat 12 miles north of Yoju The fight took a heavy toll among two enemy regiments about 6000 men who spent 12 hours Thursday trying to squeeze UN troops into submission by at tacks on 3 sides AP Correspondent Don Hutn the allies broke the back of the communist manzai charge when air power and reinforce ments reached them at p m Thursday The allies had a roadblock to their rear in addition to the 3 pronged attack But the reds man ning the roadblock never had a chance to bother the UN regi mental combat team because they reinforcing ele virt6ally wiped STATUTE AP Wirephoto UN OFFENSIVE ROLLS ON forces were less than 10 miles from the Han river which skirts Seoul A Friday as their 9dayold offensive pushed ahead Twelve miles north of Yoju B allied forces smashed their way out of a trap set by thousands of communists who at tacked them in wild handtohand fighting Relief Seen as Ground Hog Retreats It was clear and cold in Iowa Friday and you had your choice of two forecasts The weather bureau in its 5day outlook said the bitter cold that sent the temperature early Friday to as low as 38 below zero would moderate The ground hog in its 6weeks outlook said we would have more winter The ground hog came out of his hole saw his shadow made ois prediction turned the whole business back to the weather bu au and retired to his hole again dropped below zero all over the state Friday Eastern Iowa particularly was in he deep freeze Decorah reported 38 below Elkader 34 Cresco and Lansing 28 Bonaparte 30 Du Duque 23 Mason City 22 Iowa City 21 Burlington 16 and Dav enport 15 However the weather bureau said the weather will now warm up a bit It forecast high tempera ures the next 5 days of between 28 and 36 and lows averaging be tween 10 and 17 Highs of 10 to 15 above are fore cast for Friday with lows Friday night expected to range from 5 to 10 above zero WagePrice Freeze Sees Mild Thaw Washington nations wageprice freeze showed signs Friday of a mild thaw but of ficials still struggled with the complicated problem of devising a general overall formula to gov ern future relaxation of controls The first break in last Fridays acrosstheboard price freeze came late Thursday when the of ice of price stabilization OPS announced that all strictly mili tary items will be exempted from ceilings A few minutes later the agency oT an in crease of up to 90 cents a ton in the price of coal A few hours before ceilings were dropped on military buying the wage stabilization board OPS a division of he economic stabilization agency a costofliving pay boost of two cents an hour for 12000 plants Aviation company This firm has arge military contracts The board made it clear how ever that the approval did not mean it had okayed the general jrinciple of cost of living soosts in the future were hit by the ments and were out This savage fight took place near Chipyong 8 Miles From Seoul On the left flank in the west AP Correspondent Jim Becker said allied forces drove to a point 4000 yards south of Anyang be tween 8 and 9 miles south of Seoul in that area Turkish troops made the greatest miles sweeping forward with flashing bayonets through rugged mudsodden hill country against a firmly dugin enemy The Turks toward Inchon Seouls port The strategy of Lt Gen Mat thew B Ridgway 8th army com mander appeared to dictate that UN troops hit harder against chosen segments of Chinese and North Korean enemy forces UN May Halt Short of 38th Parallel By JOHN M HIGHTOWER Washington reported decision to halt United Nations forces short of the 38th parallel if they can drive that far north indicated Friday that this coun try is ready to keep the way open for a possible diplomatic settle ment of the Korean war Responsible authorities said Thursday night that such a de cision had been reached and would be transmitted to the UN commander Gen Douglas Mac Arthur if it had not been al ready Although they were reluc tant to discuss the development even privately the intent appear ed to be to create if possible a basis for new efforts at a polit ical settlement The old dividing line between North and South Korea is still regarded by officials as having political significance even though it has been crossed and recrossed by both the UN and communist forces in the past The idea that a ceasefire ar rangement might be worked out by having the Chinese commu nists withdraw north of the paral lel and UN forces remain south of it has been discussed in the UN Moreover the present military situation in Korea is such that ex perts here feel a decisive victory by either the communists or the United Nations forces is virtually impossible and if the struggle is to be ended it will have to be by other than military means With respect to a political set tlement the U S m the past has taken the position that an agree ment to end the fighting must precede any negotiations on the terms of a final agreement ZOO SABOTAGED Vancouver B C hog day was a flop here Friday Zoo keepers reported a hungry member of the wease everything Las week he ate the zoos only ground hog workers in of the North California American April Draft Call Same as for 1st 3 Months of 51 Washington d e f e n se department Thursday asked selec ive service to supply 80000 men during April for the army The draft calls for each of the first 3 months of this uary February and have been for 80000 men The April call brings total army draft requests to 530000 men since drafting was resumed last fall The defense department said the navy air force and marines do not plan to place draft calls for April So far all draftees have been for thearmy EastWest Rail Links Crumble Cancel 25 Trains in New York Restrict Mail as Freight Piles Up By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Rail links between New York and the rest of the country were sreaking apart Friday Elsewhere the crisis caused by the switchmens sick call strike was growing more critical With the nations economy hreatened the government pressed o end the walkout Twentyfive major trains con necting New York with the west were canceled Both the New York Central and the Pennsylvania shut off vital commuter service between New York and many suburbs Other cities had similar prob lems Ill Trains Out Cincinnati a union terminal official said will be without pas Senger train service within 24 hours unless the strike ends Normally 111 passenger trains daily move in and out of Cincin nati Switchmen appeared ignoring the reported appeals of rail union officials to end their work stop page their 2nd in 6 weeks As the strike grew forcing ad itipnal layoff of thousand workers in other industries the government imposed a partial em bargo on mail Mail freight and express piled high as freight yards in many ma jor cities remained idle Embar goes earlier had been clamped on freight and express at many places The sick walkouts of rail workers have spread to more than 42 railroads in 40 cities War Shipments Halted were halted 6fluel oil shipments threatened a shortage for many homes Combat for the forces in Korea were tied up in Chicagos freight yards An army spokesman said that only the Rock Island and Chicago Great Western roads are operating normally at Chicago Others he went on are hobbling along with supervisors throwing the switches However the army spokesman said some Burlington switchmen had returned to their jobs at Chi cago Ford Plants Shut Down A shutdown of 8 Ford Motor company plants because of parts and materials shortages resulting from the freight tieup threw some 12500 Ford employes out of work involved are Ford assembly plants at Chicago Dallas Louis ville Ky Somerville Mass St Paul Minn and Kansas City the LincolnMercury plant at St Louis and the station wagon body plant at Iron Mountain Mich Closing of the Kansas City plant was caused by both the rail strike and a power failure If power is restored the plant probably will be reopened Saturday Ignore Appeals The postoffice departments embargo on mail that declared in was the similar to previous Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Fair with rising tem peratures through Saturday Low Friday night zero High Saturday 22 Iowa Fair and warmer Friday night and Saturday Low Friday night zero to 8 above west 5 above to 5 below east High Sat urday 18 to 25 Southwesterly winds 1520 M P H Saturday Further outlook Low Saturday night 14 to 18 Partly cloudy and warmer Sunday with high 26 to 30 FiveDay will average near normal Nor mal highs 28 to 36 Normal lows 10 to 17 Temperatures will rise to near normal Sunday Only minor changes the rest of the period Precipitation will aver age onequarter inch occurring as snow or rain about Tuesday Minnesota Fair and warmer Fri day night Saturday increasing cloudiness and warmer Low Friday night 2 above to 8 below High Saturday 1520 IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics for the 24 hours ending at 8 a m Maximum 5 strike It directly affected 10 ma jor York City Chi cago Philadelphia Baltimore Cleveland Washington St Louis Atlanta Trenton N J and Jack sonville Fla post offices will not ac cept restricted mail for delivery in any of those cities The new mail embargo sets up a complex AP Wirephito STRIKE IDLES FREIGHT lines of freight cars stand idle in the yards at Atlanta Ga one of more tKan a score of cities affected by the strike of trainmen The strike in Atlanta has hit 7 of the 8 lines operating in that area Ike Says U S to Furnish Only Fraction of Defense Force 4 Die in Day on By The Associated Press Four more persons died as a re sult of traffic accidents in Iowa Thursday Hugh Taylor 17 a Harlan high school youth Avas killedand his sister was injured Thursday night when the farm truck Taylor was driving went off the highway about a mile northeast of Council Bluffs The body of H E Meyer 59 of Grinnell was found near his wrecked pickup truck at a Rock Island crossing on a county road east of the Grinnell city limits Coroner W B Phillips said Mey ers truck apaprently struck a Rocket train that goes through Grinnell shortly after midnight Harry L Kelly 78 Newton serv ice station operator and former head of the commissary depart ment of a circus died in Skiff hos pital in Newton of injuries suf fered in a twocar collision near Ainsworth Sunday Charles Huitink 38 farmsr who lived southwest of Orange City died in a hospital there of injur ies suffered in an autotruck col lision pattern of zones between which it will not be possible to move bulk mail In the 10 cities the order re stricted acceptance of 2nd 3rd and 4th class mail for outoftown delivery Air mail service was not affected Also still accepted are 1st class mail weighing less than 8 ounces daily newspapers and emergency package mailing of medicines drugs and surgical sup plies Minimum At 8 a m 21 7 AP Wirephoto DEAD END This collapsed Korean bridge effectively ended the travels of a Russianmade T34 tank near Su won on Koreas western front An allied observer is shown looking over thescene Washington Dwight p Eisenhower testified Friday that the be called upon to furnish of the western force Appearing at aSurprise session of the senate armed services com mittee the general stuck to his contention that congress ought not to limit the number of ground troops to be sent to Europe He said the sending of addional units of U S troops to Europe soon would be worth sending two or 3 times as many later Endorses Draft at 18 Previously he had endorsed a proposal to draft 18year olds The supreme commander of the North Altantic defense force said he didnt think it appropriate for him to answer a question by Sen ator Wherry of Nebraska the re publican floor leader about con gressional action on the troopsto Europe issue Wherry contended that no troops should be committeed until congress passes on the policy In response to further questions by Wherry a guest of the commit tee at the hearing Eisenhower said that Europe must provide the bulk of the foot soldiers needed to garrison it against possible com munist attack Ours is to be the small fraction not the great fraction of the troops Eisenhower said If it were not we would not be de manding for our associates all that they can produce Needs Flexibility He said however that he needs flexibility in determining the number of American divisions He also expressed confidence the western European nations will be able to build an effective defense force within a resonable time Eisenhower who will address the nation by radio and television tonight p m was making another appearance on capitol hill to report on his tour of European defenses against com munist aggression Dulles Offers Japs Defense After Treaty Tokyo United State ridajr incited Japan to join a col iective defense agreement base on American power after a peac treaty is signed AmbassadoratLarge John Fos ter Dulles made the offer in careful and official speech befor the AmericaJapan society Toj government and business leader were among several hundred per sons present Dulles said Japan could decide for herself But he warned Japan must choose between joining thi United States or inviting commu nisfc aggression and Today the principal deterren power to aggression is possessed by the United States Dulles said the United States i prepared to combine this power with that of other western under the United Nations charter so that the deterrrent powei which protects us also will pro tect others He said the United States would consider retaining defense forces n and near Japan as a testimony o the unity of our countries This was in effect the first official pro 3osal to continue the present ac ual defense precautions for Japan after the treaty Truman Assails Rail Strike as Security Threat Washington The white house declared Friday the rail road strikes are directly injuring our national security and the na tion can not tolerate their continu ance Joseph Short presidential press secretary made that statement to reporters He said President Truman had authorized him to make it No matter how much the union members may object to what their leaders have done they cannot be justified in pre venting the flow of food and fuel for our people and supplies for our soldiers Short said The reference to union members disagreeing with their leaders was to the refusal of the unions to accept a pay and working agreement which their leaders approved in December Lawmakers Told More to Come Later Wants to Place U S Economy on PayasYouGo Basis Washington Tru man Friday asked congress for x luick tax increase nd said he will ask still another ncrease later In a message to the legislators Truman set out this program or raising the 1 A increase hi ndividual income taxes already scheduled to yield a record 000000000 in the fiscal year stari ng July 1 2 A increase ift corporation income taxes These with excess profits taxes included are scheduled to hit a record next year 3 A increase in excise sales be con centrated upon less essential con sumer goods These taxes are estimated to yield next year under present tax laws Totals 64 Billion The schudule outlined would mean a total tax take of 000000 This is nearly a third more than ihe record collections of World war II when the take reached in 1945 The understanding among con gress members is that the further increase Mr Truman is to request later would raise government revenues to more than 000000 The president left details of how the proposed increase is to be made for ex planation by Secretary of the Treasury Snyder To Hear Snyder Snyder will go into this at pub lic hearings to be opened Monday by the taxwriting house ways and means committee Mr Truman did give one detail He said the tiori should be retained it Old Hector Got Publicity Public Buys Qversupply Des Moincs state liq uor commission is out of pint bottles of Old Hector and Liquor Commissioner George Scott says it is evidence that he state needs a liquor comp troller Scott reported Thursday the iquor commission warehouse has no supply of 73 liquor items in cluding Old Hector pints and a lumber of wellknown brands of vhisky brandies and liqueurs Old Hector attracted consid erable attention last fall when Scott objected strongly to stock ng the stores and warehouses with that brand claiming more han 2 years supply on hand Scotts clashes with the other commissioners over Old Hector and over abolishing the position of liquor comptroller led to a icaring on commission policies by he state legislative interim com mittee last December SAME Bltek flit meant truffle In 24 Word in informed quarters was that Snyder will ask that normal corporate income tax rates be raised to 55 per cent from the present 47 per cent top The president did not specify any rate increase Friday The president nowhere named the amount of the tax increase he will ask as a second installment followingcongressional action on the first installment of 000000 Seeks Balance He pointed however to the fact that a increase in revenue would be necessary to bal ance the spending audget he has proposed for next fiscal year And he hinted that the second installment request will be 500000 by declaring it is my firm conviction that we should pay for these budget expendi ures as we go Some congress members already lave launched a campaign to cut Droposed government expendi ures aiming for a balance bud get without any increase in taxes beyond the quick e bill Senator Byrd DVa who has advocated cutting some 57000000 00 from the presidents spending budget said that with proper economy the first package tax bill would be enough Asks Budget Cut Rep Harrison DVa a mem er of the ways and means com mittee proposed in a statement a 56500000000 budget cut and 800000000 in new taxes Should congress cut the presi lents budget it would appear Mi Truman would consider a smaller econd instalment increase accept able He put it this way in his message I recommend that as rapidly as ossible the congress enact reve lue legislation to yield additional axes of at least nnually and later in the year en ct the remaining amounts needed o keep us on a pay as we go ba is Observe Developments If we follow this course our evenues will keep pace with in reasing expenditures and we hall have some months in which o obsei ve economic developments nd to consider the several serious questions that will need to be re solved before all parts of this years lax program are enacted The congress has not yet had an opportunity to act on the bud get I believe the congress will find that the budget is sound and provides only for the essen tial needs of our nation in this time of world crisis Nevertheless the appropriations actually en acted by the congress will of course control the actual expen ditures No Action Before June Congressional tax leaders said it will be at least June be fore action can be completed oa Mr Trumans tax proposals While Snyder will present the details of how theadministration   

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