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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: February 1, 1951 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - February 1, 1951, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER FOR THf HOME MASON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE THI NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH tQWANS HEICHIORi HOME EDTiOM MASON CITY DAYS Thursday Friday and Saturday Thli Paper ot Two VOL LVII Augeitcd nd United Pma Full Leu Wire Five Cent Copy MASON CITY IOWA THURSDAY IKBKUAKlrilSiSl TOi Paper Consnu iwo 1 Railroad Strike Growing More Critical UN Assembly Condemns Chinese Communists as Korea Aggressor Allies Gain 3 Miles in Bitter Fight But Chinese Trap FrenchAmerican Combat Team By OLEN CLEMENTS Tokyo forces in bit ter handtohand fighting crunch ed ahead as much as 3 miles Thursday in western Korea but a FrenchAmerican combat team was trapped by superior Chinese forces in another sector of the warfront There were increasing signs that the 8dayold United Nations limited offensive had slammed into the main red defense line south of the Han river The Han1 flows along the southeasternoutskirts of Seoul A 10th corps spokesman said theencircled regiment had been fighting off two enemy regiments lor hours in close combat He not predict its chances of breaking out of the trap Turks Advance Bayonet wielding Turkish troops made Thursdays biggest advance through rugged anc muddy hill country against an enemy firmly dug in a briefing officer said Forward elementsof this force drove to a point less 4000 yards south of Anyang on the road toSeoul Anyang is about s tefles northwest of Suwon and 11 miles south of the former South Korean capital A few miles east ward an Americanjjtanksled task hbn but tnenwithdrew chon is 3 miles east of Suwon The battlefront now extends roughly along an eastwest 5 miles north of Suwon At one point it is within 9 miles of SeouL Reds Counterattack Near the junction of the westeri and central fronts French anc American elements were reporfec earlier Thursday to have rammfe into blazing red counterattacRs near Chipyong 12 miles north o Yoju This central front location alsi Is 18 miles northwest of Wonju The enemy poured out of hide outs to strike the American French force on 3 sides The reds were at first described as 300 shouting North Koreans but an allied spokesman said they two regiments of Chinese A regiment normally is 300 to 5000 men but the American French outfit may not be at s great a It was not clear whether this action was the same as the unlo cated encirclement fight by FrenchAmerican regiment re ported by the 10th corps spokes man Thursday In the counterat tacksaround Chipyong the enem had been described as 300 shouting North Koreans wh poured out of hideouts to strik the allied forces on 3 sides The spokesman said it was tw regiments of Chinese reds wh had encircled the FrenchAmer ican combat team Substantiating evidence that th UN advance had bumped int principal enemy defenses a divi sion staff officer told Associate Press Correspondent Jim Becker When you find mines artillery and an enemy as solidly entrench ed as these are the chances ar good that you have hit his main lines Chinese Shell Lines WHERE BITTER BATTLE forces were engaged in bitter handtohand fighting in western Korea Thursday B and in the central sector A the enemy poured out of hideouts to attack FrenchAmerican forces Meantime South Korean troops were engaged in heavy fighting near Kangnung Britain Asks laution on Sanctions Lake Success United Nations assembly voted over whelmingly Thursday to tag COIR munist China as an aggressor hi iorea but a warning by Britain 0 go slow on sanctions raised c big question as to the next step The assembly vote was he same as the ballot in the po itical committee Tuesday night Che 5 Soviet bloc countries were oined by India and Burma in casting the opposing vote Eight countries abstained and Saudi recorded as not participating Thursdays action brought to an end the present phase of the dip omatic battle which was touched off by a report from Gen Doug as MacArthur 12 weeks ago thai he Chinese reds had intervened n the Korean conflict oldier is fighting without spirit ie has nopurpose for which to acrifice his life Rhee flew to U S 10th corps eadquarters to confer upon the orps commander JVIaj Gen Ed vard M Almond the Korean or er of military merit with silver tar Seven Chinese communist sol diers under a white flag sur endered Thursday They were the 1st in the 8day old western front limited offensive Screaming manzai manzai ivildly leaping North Koreans aunched their counterattack m he centralwestern front junction area at 5 a m This assault was made in the region immediately a point Xojvu reachedby allied brces Beat Off Attack UN troops beat off this first at ack centered near Chipyong but a new one started at 9 a m At 130 a m more than a regiment of communists hit the Americans and French They struck from the north east and west Swinton reported a UN tank ask force ran a gauntlet to en er Wonchon Doughboys were making grudging advances Swinton said against intensified Chinese opposition and infiltra tion attempts Swinton said the main Chinese defense line uncovered by the al lied attack showed that red de enses had been hastily erected since the UN withdrawal south of the Han The strong points were deep foxholes and logcov ered dugouts manned by the Chi nese 50th army in that immedi ate sector On the extreme east coast Soutt Koreans engaged an estimated 2 battalions Wednesday night south of Kangnung Results were un determined Weather Report FORECAST MasonCity Fair and quite sold Thursday night Fair with slow ly rising temperature Friday Low Thursday night 15 to 20 below owa Fair Thursday night anc Friday Low Thursday night 10 to 20 below Rising temperatures Friday with high 12 to 18 Fur ther outlook Low Friday night 5below to 5 above Increasing cloudiness Saturday with slight ly higher daytime temperatures High Saturday 15 to 20 Minnesota FairThursday nigh Fridayincreasing south westerly winds andslowly ris Thursdaj night Rising temperatures con tinuing south portion with lit tie change in extreme nortl Friday Low Thursday nigh 10 to 20 below High Friday E above north 812 above south IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistic or the 24 hours ending at 8 a m Thursday Maximum 5 Minimum 22 At 8 a m 22 Precipitation trace YEAR AGO Maximum 15 Minimum 8 The assembly 1 Decided that communis Ihina engaged in aggression in Korea 2 Requested a committee on collective security to study what o do about meeting this aggres sionbut to hold up its work if a ood offices committee reports progress on a peaceful settlement 3 Approved creation of the good offices committee to consist f assembly President Nasrollah Sntezant of Iran and two others whom he will name 4 Called on the Peiping regime o withdraw its nationals anc lorces from Korea and to stop fighting UN forces 5 Affirmed the determination of the UN to continue its action in Korea to meet the aggression 6 Called upon all states and authorities not to Jielp trie aggres sors Just before the vote Britain Sir Gladwyn Jebb urged the as sernblytto concentrate on seeking a peaceful settlement in Kore and to go slow on sanction against the Chinese reds The most important task of the UN Jebb said is to study all pos sibilities for a peaceful settle ment leaving sanctions until last Sanctions should not be ap plied by this assembly for a Ion time he said For the 3rd straight day Chines artillery hit UN lines in wha was described as a moderate bar rage Mortar shells burst in allie positions AP Correspondent Stan bwin ton said some Chinese abandone their empty guns and fled befor the American task force whic swept into Wonchon U S mtan trymen captured 44 importan hills Thursday with red resist anceapparently waning in that TCAmerican pilots reported many communists withdrawing across the Han river ahead of the allied drive However it appeared later that at least some of these were not retreating but were hastening to the area of the counterattack around Chipyong While the battle raged Korean Syngman de to be back in Seoul president dared toon War Coming to End Expect Truman to Ask Boost in Luxury Tax By FRANCIS M LEMAY Washington hill heard Thursday that President Truman willask Friday for big tax boosts on such luxuries as whisky wine beer and cigarets to help pay huge defense costs The president outlined his pro biggest tax boosting program in an extra ordinary private meeting with house democratic and republican I tax writers Wednesday He will send a special tax message to congress Friday He said he wants 000 in new revenue to put the defense program on a payasyou go basis but he asked that it be split into two packages one a quick increase in individual corporation and excise taxes sometimes called nuisance or selective sales See Car Tax Up The excise boosts he will ask may also extend to motor ve hicles now taxed at the manu facturers level at a rate of 7 per cent on autos and 5 on trucks and to gasoline on which the rate is now li cents a gallon The president is understood to have made no suggestions for a federal retail sales tax There were indications he will ask along with some other excise boosts an increase in the whisky Crash Near Red Oak Claims 4th Victim Red Oak Kratke 27 Fender Nebr Thursday be came the 4th victim of the head on collision of a truck and ca near here on highway 34 Kratke died early Thursday in a Red Oak hospital without hav ing regained consciousness since the crash Wednesday morning 7 miles west of hereThree other Fender men were killed in the col lision A coroners jury ruled late Wed nesday that the accident resulted when Truck Driver Ansel Wal ton Hastings attempted to pass small truck towing a house Third ABlast in Week Jolts Las Vegas Las Vegas Nev 3r atomic blast in a week lit up th predawn sky northwest of her Thursday One witness describe it as like a huge flash gun which photographers use An atomic energy spokesma confirmed that it was the 3r atomic test at the sprawling 500 square mile test range near here This makes it No 12 in the lis of atomic explosions set off sine the 1st at Aiamagordo N Mex July 16 1945 The AEC spokesman wou give no details of what sort o test took place There has bee much speculation that the gov ernment is testing a variety c atomic weapons besides the bomb which hit Hiroshima and Naga brought th AP Wircphoto AIwirepnoio EISENHOWER MEETS WITH MILITARY LEADERS Dwight D Eisenhpwfer meets with mergers of the standing military committee qf the North Atlantic treaty organization at the Pentagon in Washington after returning from his trip to Europe Seated left to right Gen Omar Bradleychairman of the U Sjoint chiefsof Staff Eisenhower andAir Marshal Lord Tedder of Great Britain committee cnaupmn Standing Vice Adm Jerauld Wright U S Gen Paul ElyFrance and Lt Gen Alfred M Gruerither Eisenhowers chief of staff 33 Lines in 18 Big Cities U S Union Act to End Stoppage Some Freight Embargoed By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS An unauthorized strike of rail road switchmen highballed across the nation Thursday putting a rake on the countrys rail trans portation The wildcat walkout moving into the 3rd day appeared grow ing more critical by the hour It panned the nation hitting direct f against 33 railroads in 18 ma or cities Scoresof othercarriers felt the mpaqt of the jfastspreading work toppage So did other industries housands of nonrailroad work rs were made idle by the strike Government Acts The government moved to end he strike Sodid officials of the Brotherhood of Railroad Train men But as they acted new stop pages were reported The strike appeared following he pattern of the crippling strike of 6weeks ago which in 3 days nearly paralyzed movement of passengers freight arid mail in of the country That walkout ended only after inter vention of President Trumanand court action Gov Edward F Arn of Kansas suggested that President Truman if he so desired touldstop vNo USArms to Europe Asks Troops n roportion to Europes Washington Gen Dwight D Eisenhower told c congress Thursday there is acceptable alternative to help in rearming Europe The 5star generai chosen to head the allied defense forces against Russian aggression pub licly joined tne great debate over committing U S troops to those torces with an adqress to an in formal joint meeting of the sen and house e said too that Europes greatest need now js not Amer ican soldiers but equipment which question de sire to resist aggression a spirit to resist he iaid There is a determination to do their take the risk Eisenhower sketched briefly conditions in individual European countries as he said he found them He said there is no ques tion that France has deter mined to face up to the threat of drawer of the ice box agai he said must be quantity and quid As to transfer delivered in y Of American troops to Europe Eisenhower said that should be jn a ratio to what the Europeans themselves provide He argued We must give Europe assist ance not only because there is no acceptable alternayve but be cause if we were ieft standing alone isolated in a world of com munism our system would wither away Desire to Resist Solemnly had told the lawmakers eairijer that their decisions on defence cooperation with Western Europe would de termine the course of civilization and whether fret governments would continue to exist Just back from a tour of Eu rope Eisenhower sajd there is no Tht 75yearold president also The war is already coming to an end presumably because the Chinese communist r suffered cuts and bruises tax from a gallon to At the tax would be about 12 to 15 cents a drink Whisky is one of the biggest revenue producers in the excise list GlobeOawtte photo by Jlussfr IjlOQCUazeive pftc NEW POSTMASTER SWORN Citys new postmaster Henry c Dorothy Dunn who has been acting postmaster 13 1949 and post IJOrOiny UUlin wnu iioa irccu j office inspector Waterloo who gave the oath Pendergrafts term began Thursday Miss woru Dunn returned to her employment at the offices of her brother Atty GeorKe D Dunn 1952 22 Reported Little communism from within and without And he said he found the same spirit in Belgium Hol land andDenmark Norway Determined There is no question about Norways determination to resist o the point of destruction he went on He said he found in Rome a stiffening of Italian morale and efforts to make that countrys de fense force more efficient Eisenhower said he did not want to speak now about the mili tary potential of Germany He said the diplomats must comeup with a political platform for Ger many which gives that nation equality before any of its military units could be used in an inter national defense force He said while it would be false and idle to say there does not exist a spirit of pessimism and defeatism in some quarters in Europe he feels there has been a rejuvenation in Europes morale As to the U S need of West ern Europe Eisenhower said Western Europes skilled labor constitutes the greatest pool in the world and it has an industrial fabric 2nd onlyto the U S plus more than 200000000 persons He said if that potential were transferred to the otherside the military balance of power would be shifted so drastically our safe ty would be gravely imperiled Calling attention to the depend ency of the U S on strategic ma terials produced in other parts of the world Eisenhower rioted that this country imports manganese copper and uranium the latter the principal ingredient of the atom bomb The U S now is getting a major share of uranium from the Belgian Congo Eisenhower said western Europe is so important to our future that we cannot afford to do less than our best to make sure it does not this country patience with our allies Mason City was back in the to Thursday morning with a recor of 22 degrees below zero at 8 a m the coldest it has been this winter at this hour The record low was o Dec 26 The next lowest tempera ture locally was on Jan 31 Thursdays low temperature wa reached by a constant drop from 5 degrees above reached Wedner day There was but a trace of sno in Mason City as the cold north west wind bore down upon it bu swirling snow and sleet laid damaging blanket of ice and slus from Texas to New England Bitter Cold Bitter cold brought suffering t millions and the toll of lives an property mounted hourly as th temperature dropped Thursday morning it was at Alexandria Minn at Far go NDak at Dodge City Kans and at Dalhart Texas as the great winter storm battere the nation relentlessly The wintry onslaught ha claimed at least 215 lives sine Saturday Morethan half died in accident on iceglazed highways Sixtyon perished in fires U S weather forecasters a Chicago said they were amaze at the severity andextent of th storm No Relief Forecaster John Porter said n relief could be expected Thursday Temperatures will moderate ir the north central states Friday h said but will continue well below normal The mercury olummeted to 5 degrees belowzero at West Yel lowstone Mont It hit 42 belov at Bemidji Minn 39 below a Butte Mont and Grantsburg Wis 38 below at Laramie Wyo 34 below at Fort Collins Colo 26 below at Duluth Minn and 2 below at Denver and Colorad Springs Colo go down the JMS rr sa jsgrvs to waste ioriiri vaiipv had suffered in temperatures for the strike witfari There was no Truman personally planned to in tervene But thearmy which as tech nically in charge of the nations railroads said it was planning ac tion to deal with the walkout Takes Court Action As the strike grew the govern ment took court action to end it The government also through the defense transport administration DTAp ordered the railroads to embargo freight which cannotbe moved through yards tied tip by the walkout At the same time the Railway Express Agency clamped an em bargo on rail express shipments between 14 northeastern states and the rest of the country The Association of American Railroads in Washington said 25 separate embargo actions have been takenby various carriers af fecting freight movement either to or through Chicago St Louis De troit and Knoxville Tenn No Mail Embargo No embargo on mail was or dered But postoffice officials in Washington were watching devel opments in the strike The DTA also directed the rail roads to give priority to shipments for the military services Earlier the army said the strike threatened serious effects to war shipments The B R T with which the switchmen are affiliated was giv en until Feb 14 by Federal Judge Michael L Igoe to answer a peti tion filed Wednesday by govern ment attorneys in Chicago The pe tition asked a rule against the brotherhood to show cause why it should not be held in contempt for violation of an antistrike re straining order issued last De cember B R T officials are scheduled to appear in federal court in Chi cago Friday on a similar rule is sued in last Decembers strike of 10000 switchmen Thursday the strike was re ported in 18 cities including St Louis Milwaukee Buffalo N Y Peoria 111 Washington Portland Ore Philadelphia Trenton N J Knoxville Tenn Dallas Tex Cleveland St Paul Racine Wis Toledo Atlanta and New York In New York Defense Adminis tration Chief James K Knudsen said the strike is likely to affect seriously the transportation of wheat iron ore perishables and other commodities throughout the country The U S Steel Corp began banking 4 of the 10 blast furnaces at its big south Chicago plant At the Wisconsin steel works in Chi idgo 2000 employes were laid off and 2700 employes at the Ford assembly plant were expected to be made idle Thursday NAMED DIRECTORS and 8 to 18 ge temoeratures wcre forecast said the nation a program for security that can be supported over the next 20 or 30 years or more adding for Thjinsdav night We must be ready at all times blast hit Denver and one of the important times to so suddcnly that residents were be ready is today caught unprepared Garages and Eisenhower said that at present oil wcre flooded with au our western European allies have tom0biie owners reporting cracked little in the way of munitions promotor blocks Stocks of anti duction But he added their pofreeze Were exhausted tential is growing He urged that promised to supply 25 battle worthy divisions by the end of 16 SHIPWORKERS DIE Belfast Northern Ireland workmen were and 46 injured Wednesday when a gangplank leading to a ship under construction collapsed at a shipyard j Jr of Des Moines have been elected directors of the Iowa Power and Light company SAME M   

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