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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: January 10, 1951 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - January 10, 1951, Mason City, Iowa                                NOtTHWWAS MTU FOK THC BEljAZETTE TNI NfWStAMt THAT MAKII AIL NO ITM IQ W A MS M11 Otr OH nAttN art IOWA M mi of 18Year Raise inough Taxes fg Wexf Budget Sum Needed Believed at Billion National Levy Considered Strong Possibility 4 oil the Treasury Snydw uid Wed nesday Prerident Truman wiU call on congrew this week to rmlw iaxes enough to balance tile budget Snyder refuted to give any fif are whatsoever on how much taxes that how much the budget will be for the fiscal year teeginning July 1 Onedemocratic congressional leaderlaid heunderstands the budget will be in the neighbor hood of andthat Mr Truman will ask for about in new taxes That would be a lump of newly SO per cent Fran White Howe Thli official who asked not to be named has been in close touch with the house on tax and budget matters Thats the way ihe program was shaping up the I heard be told a reporter Be added that original plans called for budget of about 000000000 but I understand they hare decided to cut that back jomc to around 170000000000 Last minute changes might make tot figures a little higher than that The treasury cfcief told report ers tot president will lay down a full policy in lus economic report Friday and hit budget message next Monday This Snydec said will be followed by specific taxboosting recommen dations In a special bc Jore 1 The recommenda tions will deal with the fiscal year 19S2 beginning Juljr which will be the first which the speeded up ment program show real im pact on the budget Some Breather Talk The president is going to say that the taxes to protect revenues would be levied to balance the budget Snyder said Harlier there had been talk on Capitol hill thattaxpayers might get a years breather before tak ing on any new tax burden al though the chairman of the boose tax committee said he expects new levies to be enacted by midsum mer Meanwhile Senator Anderson DN Mex said in a speech high and responsible officials have discussed the possibility that 10 to IS billion dollars u year would have to be raisea through a national sales tax President Truman said in a let ter to Senator Byrd Tues day the nation must be taxed un til it hurts Byrd also suggested that a sales or transaction tax would be necessary Breathing spell talkdespite recent emphasis on payasyou go aroused on capital hill by a remarkTuesday of Senator George chair man of the senatefinance com mittee He said there is no assmr ance work ott a new tax bill can be competed this year Air Force Recruits in Mason City Will Not Leave Thursday Seventyfive air force recruits who were to leave Mason City Thursday will not leave at that time according to word received by Sgt L J Seilerair force re cruiting officer in Mason City Iowa is allowed only 17 per day he said so only a few willbe leav ing daily from Mason City Famed 0sage Red Cross Girl READ WCKENLOOPER congratukfory telegram from Sena tor Bourke HicketUoopw at the state hoaae in Des Moinea Tuesday are left to right Hioes Mount reading clerk Rep W H Bill Tate and Lt Gov Bill Nicholas Standing Jeft to right Viola Towle Cedar Rapids now secretary to Nicholas and Senator Her man K All but Miss Towle are from Mason City Novelist Sinclair Lewis 1st American Winner of Nobel he in Literature Is Dead Bone Lewis bit ingly realistic novelist of modern American life who brought Ameri can literature its 1stNobel prize died here Wednesday He woulc have been next Feb 7 The noted author of 21 nooks most of them best sellers died the Villa Electra clinic where lie had been a patient with bronchia pneumonia since Dec 31 Hospital attendants said he sufferedalso from an inflammation of the heart Creator of George Babbitt the typical American businessman ol the Lewis made literary history also with such searching studies of American life as Main Weather Report FORECAST CHr Fair and not much change to temperature Low Wednesdaynight about 5 above High Thursday 37 fanWednesday night Somewhat colder Wednesday night with low S to 10 north 10 to 15 south Locally colder over arets Partly cloudy and mild Thursday with highSB to to touth Southerly M P B Thursday Further out look Low Thursday tugtit 18 to tt Friday parUy cloudy with little change In temperature Friday nearW Fair Wednesday night Soraewnat colder Wednesday Thursday partly cloudy wfth modtMte Low WetfMrtay mfht around north md tarn to 10 atoje MM Mirth IN MASON CITY at 1am ai JjGKfe Street Grantry Happen Here Royal Arrowsmith Elmer It cant and Kingsblood Prise In He was awarded the Nobel prize in 1930 chiefly for Babbitt Four years before he had refused a Pulitzer prize because he dis agreed with the terms of Joseph Pulitzers will setting up thepWze His 21st book The GodSeek er was published in 1949 The famous author had been under treatment for some time said hecealized his death was neat and Avantedto die in Italy where he wrote Babbitt and where he met his 2nd wife ColumnistCommentator Dorothy Thompson After a visit to Italy in 194ft he returned to the United States his friends said to put his affairs in returnedhere early this year and after a sojourn in Florence took an apartment in Rome with secretary Alex ander Manson Associates disclosed that he had outlined the J plot of a new book to be tltted Courage on the theme that courage a commod ity belonging to those who are afraid V Beytod Uw outline however be had done no writing on the book they Mid condition became grave I ago his doctor said heart collapied Wedneaday Born in Sauk Center Ulan on Feb 7 1889 Lewis aittr student at Yale on came out W UN rat anwu American His bCaJWd the typically American people of Isws with biting Htin wsMoewib reattm Amid cwtwewy put sMta street ONI BabWtt toto UM Usuaafe Owtry and a and minor Mblea ol SISCLAIK LEWIS 1930s banned It Cant Happen Here a warning against fascism in the United Stares Lewis wasmarriedtwiceBoth his 1st wife Grace Livingston Hegger and Miss Thompson di vorced him Wells Lewis sonby his 1st mar riage and an army lieutenant In World war II was killed in action in France Michael Lewis his son by Miss Thompson reportedly re turned to the United States last week to visit his mother He had been studying dramatics in Lon don The novelists brother Claude Lewis lives in St Cloud Minn Quadruplets Born to Michigan Couple were bom Wednesday to Mrs Anne Rosebush 34 wife a yearold stonemason 3t Mercy hospital re ported the two and two girls and their mother were doing fine Sorter M Phinpaa hospital ad ministrator said the bom jy Caesarian section rwne placed in an incubator immediately They are tod Ibr f let of The only are the of Ltnainf now 10 yean old A boy welfhtar S ounces was born 1st than came a and f I weJitotoT Denfes Plan tvdcuqte General MacAr thurs official spokesman Wed nesday denied there any fact to a printed in the United States that the general had recommended withdrawal of all United Nations forces from Korea t He referred to a copyrighted story by Keyes Beech Chicago Daily News correspondent cover ing MacArthurs headquarters which said MacArthur was un derstood to have recommended to Washington withdrawal of all United Nations forces from Ko rea Beech said he obtained his information from sources Asked tocomment on the story Col Marion PEchols MacAr thurs official spokesman said There has been nothing offir cial or unofficial said regarding the evacuation of K OT e a That story is purely a figment of the writers imagination In Washington the pentagon said it had received no recom mendation frohi Gen MacArthur for a withdrawal of United Na tions forces from Korea f Osages wofld fanied Ann Goplerud the Red Cross girl who won the hearts of thousands of GIs overseas during World war II as Anzio Ann is back once more with thefighting men She is one of 7 girls serving in Pusan Korea with the Red Cross unit for the United Nations and her lettersto her parents the Clif ford Gopleruds are filled With de scriptions of the disorderand con fusion in thtt wartorn area Annssoft appealing voice sent her thousands of miles through Europe singing for service men during tiie last war She was the subject of magazine and news paper and the symbol of the girl back home for American soldiers in Europe She arrived in Korea in October and since then had been trying to make connec AP Wliephoto ALLIES REENTER YPONJU American and French troops Wednesday fought their way back into Wonju The allies entered the city from the southeast Another contingent was only yards away from the rail hub on the aouth The city controls a road network leading to Taejon and Taejru main routes for forces withdrawing from Seoul General MacArthur in a war summary said the reds were concentrating troops between Osan and Wonju and north of Seoul Wonju Key Transport City Retaken by UN Controls Now LLewis wage stabilization board Wednesday he opposes any price or wage controls at this time The president of the United Mine Workers union argued that collective bargaining would take care of wtgm and that it would e impossible to control prices because the cost of living increases provided in eon racts covering millions of work ers and 2 the dividends being paid to industrial investors Lewis laid there had been rampant dissatisfaction with efforts to control prices during World war II and pointed to the wartime scarcity of mejit as an ndication of the futility of such sfftfrts ANN GOPLERITD tionwith her brother Capt Pedet Goplerud serving there with an evacuation hospital unit The two finally met the day after Christ mas But the emotion she felt at that meeting was no greater than the Christmas party given at the UN club in Pusan for 200 war orphans Men of the United Nations forces held the children on their laps she writes and stuffed them with doughnuts cocoaand membering their own back home And when the 200 high squeaky voices were raised to sings God Bless America in English Ann says therewere tears running down the cheeks of the hardened veterans who had survived warin all its Ann knows about that too be cause she was the 1st woman to go on the beachhead at Anzio where she sang for the battle weary troops By LED1 EUCKSON and French troops with tanks Wednes day fought back into central Korean roadrail hub Wonju The town had abandoned to the reds Monday after two days of tough fighting over it Field dispatcher said a com panysize patrol smashed a re Korean counterattackand rollec into WonjUirom the southeast The 2nd division company with French support drove through deep snow into Wonju xalong the from Chechon There were no reds in the city AP Correspondent William Bar nard reported from the 2nd di vision front Other elements of the division ground 100 yards closer to Wonju from the south against a strong counterattack by 6 red battalions This force fighting up the main ChungjuWpniu road last was reported two miles from the road center Web of The AmericanFrench assault teams launched then assault to retake Wonju ina swirling snow storm Tuesday They fought through had of K enemy mortar and small arms fire Wonju controls web of roads leading into the heart of South Korea The attack by the 2nd division veterans of the Naktong and Chongchon river battles was the biggest United Nations offensive effort in days Weare incontact with North Koreans now and we intend to give them hell the allied com mander said as the attack started GenEisenhower Arrives in Holland The ttefne The JP Dwight D Eisenhower ar rived in Holland Wednesdayfor the 3rd of a 10nation checkup on western Europes contributions to his Atlantic Alliance army Eisenhower proceeded immedi ately from Schilpol airport near Amsterdam to The Hague seat of the Dutch government A crowd of several hundred ap plauding Belgians shouting Good luck Ike speeded the generals departure earlier from Brussels where he conferred with high po litical and military leaden An American officer there said the remits of the working MS have been excellent Earlier Eisenhower was oes tcribed reasonably well satis fied with mrvejr of defence during tit two UNDCAN lUXTT acefcleotaUy wkaa be cane Into tact wftk a Mali votaM ctitvtt while warfctflf on an KKA Vm U avUei north of Correspondent Barnard said the battle scene was like a Christmas card picture He added There was the soft white valr ley majestic frosted mountains and a peaceful looking road Snowsifted down But murderous enemy fire from foothills swept the valley and the road The thunder of al lied artillery rolled continuously and echoed through the valley and arounfthe peaks Smallarms fire crackled in cessantly Enemy mortar fire found the road Lay In Allied soldiers with rifles lay on their stomachs in the snow The force ob viously was fighting to throw off balance the communist drive down central Koreas mountain roads The red thrust threatened the TaejonTaegu escape corridor for 8th army forces withdrawing in the west toward the old allied Putin beachhead General MacArthurs Wednes day afUiiiOon war summary said my large communist force strung along a 70mile front from OMUI to Wonju was capable of mounting a powerful offensive supported in great MacArthur and 8th army esti mates the strength of the red force along the OtanWonju line in clow reserve at possibly the O s a nWonju lineor nearby for quick rein forcement A Mongolian cavalry division 4000 4o 5000 in mountaia reconnaissance an quick harassing a Chinese artillery division also were reported in area At the western end of the line MacArthurs report said a red Ko rean corps of 3 30000 in position In addition 8th army reports said 3 North Korean divisions were massed around Wonju where the days Tieavy battle swirled While the Wonju bsttle raged AP Correspondent John Randolph reported there was no contaci southeast of Osan where 8th army forces were withdrawing Eighth officers said mud and snow may have slowed the red advance but there was no les sening in the communist buildup The top commanders report the communists in an prmtft buildup hud 7 Chtntat umks crops ot 21 dl men at full Iowa Air Force Quota Limited to 17 Each Day Des Moines has been limited to a quota of 17 anforce enlistees each day Maj Donald Andre deputy in charge of re cruitingfor the Iowa military dis trict announced Wednesday This compares to ah average of 25 air force enlistees each day or thelast 10 days The nationwide rush of enlist ments has overloaded the Lack and air force base at San Antonio Tex which is the air forces only training center at present The ivercrowding has forced the cut iack in daily enlistments Two Exceptions Major Andre explained there re two exceptions to the quota Enlistments are unlimited for ny manwith twoyears of col ege training and for anyoneWith irior military service Thus college juniors and seniors will be able to enlist in the air orce if they prefer prior to re eiving preinduction draft no ices Once the college student re eived the preinductioh notice e cannot enlist Major Andre said all shipments of air force enlistees into the Des Moines air force recruiting statioh has been halted to regulate the processing of enlistees according to the new quota He added that contrary to an earlier statement there is no possibility of members of the air force being transferred into the infantry or other branches of the armed forces KM PostiMe New Major Andre saidsuch trans fers were possible during World war II when the air force was a part of the army Since the air force has been created as a separ ate branch of service that is not possible he said The navy recruiting station here announced earlier that it also had been put under daily quotas to refulato thv flew of to training Navy recruiting officials In DM MoinM are not authorUtd to re veal their daily quota Would Coll First Year All Physically Fit Would Liable for 27Month Hitch the defe department called Wednesday for an immediate start on drafting ot 460000 18yearolds to build up the armed forces Secretaryof Defense Marshall andMrs Anna M Rosenberg as sistant secretary outlined the pro posal to a senate armed in urging immedi ate enactment ot a universal mil itary service and training program making all physically fit olds liable for 27 months service Mrs Rosenberg said that unless the armed services can call on 18yearolds they will have to ask congress to let them draft young1 married meni Fathers New Exempt She said in that case fathers as well as husbands without chil dren might have to be called from the present 1926 age brackets are now exempt The proposal from the defense officials lined up in this manner 1 Enact long term legislation aimed at requiring training and service of all physically and mentally fit young men beginning at age 18 2 Until that program can be handled take the 18yearolds who are now nearest their 19th birthday Mrs Rosenberg estimated that 450000 18yearolds could be called in the 1st year under ent ceilings on the size of the armed forces She also estimated 1050000 young men would reach theage of 18 in the 12 months ending next July 1 and might be pos sible to grant one year defer ments to those who havenot at tained the age of 18 or S months at the time the pro posal became law President Asked if the program had the complete approval of President Truman Mrs Rosenberg said it did Marshall told the senators a system ot universal mLhtary service and training represents what I believe is the best way to meet our immediate need for en larged combat forces and at the same time to provide an enduring base for our military strength Marshall spoke generally in sup port of the plan and left it to Mrs Rosenberg to fill in the detaps Mrs Rosenberg said the pro gram would call for 27 months of iervice and training the service to on the same basis as any other member of the armed forces S39 a Month She said work out this way The 18yearolds would get 4 o 6 months of training drawing 30 a month for that period after which they would go into service at the same pay as other members of the forces Still under consideration Mrs Zosenberg said is how to make use of men rwho cannot pass min imum physical mental or moral equirements No specific plans have yet been made for this group she said but the president may announce measures for bringing young men in this class into the program Marshall former army chief of staff and former secretary of state was the 1st witness at what Chair man Lyndon of the subcommittee said would be an overall hearing on manpower problems Under the present draft law boys of 18 are required to register but they cannot be drafted until they reach age 19 Their service after induction is limited to 21 months The present draft law expires next July 9 The senate subcom mittee hearings are aimed at de veloping such questions as how long the law should be extended and with what changes For Combat Marshall said he felt 18 year olds should be called for actual service and combat The program proposes that young men reaching the age of 18 fulfill their obligation for the na tions defense by entering the armed forces for 27 months ot service and training Marshal said Immediately thereafter ttfcjy would enrott for a specified n a reserve component In his state of the union i on Monday President Tniuiasj called for extension and reriafen of the draft law but dU say what changes wanted   

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