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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: December 16, 1950 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - December 16, 1950, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER BDITED FOR HOME MASON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE THI NIWSPAMft THAT MAKES Alt NORTH IOWANS NIIGH10IJ HOME EDITION Mason City Open Saturday Night Until 9 Oclock VOL LVU AnouUtod Press and United Preaa full MASON CITY IOWA SATURDAY DECEMBER 16 1959 Tblt Piper Cwutrti of Two Truman Proclaims National Emergency Against Red Threat AP Wirephoto TOT TO SEE HIS FIRST CHRISTMAS Threeyearold Paul Mendonca of Fall River Mass is grinning all the time these days He is looking forward to seeing his 1st Christmas Pauls eyes have been blinded by cataracts since his birth until a 4th operation brought him sight after 3 unsuccessful surgical attempts He holds Peter Rabbit a favorite pet he never could see until bandages were re moved a few days ago Striking Switchmen Back in Most Crippled Cities Chicago railroad twitchmen in Chicago and other cities returned to work Saturday and the end of a 3day crippling Walkout appearednearing anend The struck railroads in Chicago hit by the ported nearly normal crews re turning to work on the 1st day shift earlier crews returned to work in Washington Battle Creek Mich and Alexandria Va Strikers also returned to work In Nashville Pittsburgh St Louis and Dallas Texas and report edly were prepared to end their walkout in other cities The baekfowork moves came a few hours after President Tru mans appeal tothe striking to end their unlawful walkout A top ranking labor union offi cial in Washington said the strike which has disrupted the nations transportation system for the last 3 days has been settled There was no immediate con firmation of the reported settle ment from either top union or rail officials A statement on the whole situation was promised later by union officials in Wash ington The back to work movement first was reported early Saturday in Battle Creek Mich and later in Washington andAlexandria Va The return of the strikers came shortly after President Trumans appeal to them to end their walk out He said it was slowing indus try andadding to the countrys danger His appeal was at least partly responsible for the return of the first group of strikers Mail Embargo Is Cancelled Washington postoffice department Saturday cancelled its embargo restrictions on Christmas parcel the crippling rail strike apparently ended Strikers were going back to work In increasing a broadcast appeal from President Truman Friday night for an end of the strike Railroad executives the big mail backlog could be cleaned up fast The embargo went into effect late Thursday and had applied to parcel posVfirst class mail heavier than 8 ounces and second class mail except for daily newspapers All these are now acceptable lor mailing again MM M UN Group Seeks Terms for Peace By STANLEY JOHNSON New York Indias Sir Benegal N Rau will report Gen MacArthurs terms for a cease fire in Korea to Communist Chinas Wu Hsiuchuan this week end and in return ask for Peip ings armistice conditions Meanwhile Wu and his alter nate Chaio Kuanhua conferred with UN SecretaryGeneral Tryg ve Lie at Lake Success for 75 min utes Friday night It was an nounced they requested Lie to hold a news conference Rau is acting for the United Nations 3man ceasefire com mittee which began work Friday in an effort to rush a peaceful solution of the bloody Korean war The other members are Canadas Foreign Minister Lester B Pear son and Nasrollah Entezam of Iran president of the general as sembly The Indian diplomat will report back to the Monday the result of his talks with Wu and the group will then try to reconcile the op posing views with the aim of find ing the basis for atruce They met for the 1st time Fri day night in secret and heard U S Delegate Ernest A Gross and Lt Gen Willis D Critten berger outline the views of Gen MacArthurs unified command After the meeting Pearson told a news conference The committee discussed with General Crittenberger and Mr Gross representing the unified command the basis oh which in their opinion a satisfactory cease fire could be arranged He declined to state what those views wereandsaid that it would not be possible to giveout any in formation for severaT days This is riot an easy assign ment Pearson said and hinted that a ceasefire arrangement might take some tinte to work out Pearson said that except for Raus planned visit no formal meeting has been arranged with II Vishinsky Wishes U S Merry Yule New York Y Vishinsky sailed for home Satur day with a final blast at the United States but he extended to the American people wishes of peace well being and happiness in the coming new year Russias minister of foreign af fairs voiced his criticism and of fered his Christmas greetings in a statement which he read in English after boarding the French Liner Liberte Calls for United Effort to Combat Communism Washington Truman proclaimed a state of national emergency Saturday and set up a supreme of fice of defense mobilization to help meet the crisis The proclamation summoned the nation to rally its strength against the threat of communist world conquest To head the mobilization drive Mr Truman appointed Charles E Wilson president of General Electric Co a hard driving industrialist who helped the production effort of World war II The president gave Wilson sweeping powers in an ex ecutive order directing him to direct control and coordi nate all mobilization activities MrTruman signed the proclamation at a m G S T Hisaction was announced by Stephen Early acting press secretary 5 minutes later The proclamation called all Americans to a united effort to build up the nations armed forces and throw the full moral and material strength of the country into the protec tion of its freedom The white house released a long list of laws carrying extraordinary powers which it said automatic ally became effective upon sign ing of the declaration But many of them were merely reassertions of powers already held by Mr Truman under the de fense production act and other postwar legislation May Not Use All Powers Further Early said it is uncer tain whether Mr Truman will use some of the emergencypowers The proclamation is a part of Mr Trumans effort to get produc tion speeding inflation curbing machinery in motion behind a re armament program aimed at forc ing Russia to choose peace instead of war The white house said powers available in an emergency include authority to lengthen hours in army arsenals to requisition ships call the coast guard reserve to active duty make temporary pro motions in the armed forces waive competitive bids on defense contracts and authorize war risk insurance I summon every person and every community to make with a spirit of neighborliness what ever sacrifices are necessary for the welfare of the nation Presi dent Truman said in his procla mation Grave Threat Events in Korea and elsewhere he said constitute a igrave threat to the peace of the world and im peril the efforts of this country and those of the UN to pre vent aggression and armed con flict The president added World conquest by communist imperialism is the goal of the orces of aggression that have seen loosed upon the world If this goal is achievedhe said Americans full and rich life they have built the blessings of freedom of worship of speech and the right to criti cize their government Mr Truman said communist conquest would cost the Ameri can people the right to choose hose who conduct their govern ment The right to engage freely n collectivebargaining the right o engage freely in their own Businessenterprises and the many other freedoms and rights which are a part of our way of life The increasing menace of the forces of communist aggression requires that the nationaldefense of the U S be strengthened as speedily as possible the procla mation said Thieves Fall Out Fort Worth Tex C Altins testified before a county jrand jury against Clyde C Hop tins accused taking 612 pounds of brass The jury then in licted Hopkins and also Akins the latter on a charge of receiving and concealing the brass Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Partly cloudy and gather cold Saturday night and Sunday Low Saturday night near zero High Sunday about 20 Iowa Considerable cloudiness and continued cold Saturday night and Sunday Low Saturday night 5 below to 5 above in the northeast 10 to 15 southwest High Sunday 18 to 25 northeast 25 to 35 southwest Variable winds 8 to 10 MPH Friday be coming southeasterly Sunday Further outlook Low Monday morning 8 to 15 above Consid erable cloudiness Monday with occasional snow flurries north east portion Warmer west por tion Monday Tuesday partly cloudy and warmer over entire state Minnesota Partly cloudy and con tinued cold Saturday night and Sunday Low Saturday night 10 15 below north 0S below south High Sunday 10 above north to 1520 south IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics for the 24 hours ending at 8 a m Maximum 19 Minimum At 8 a m 2 Precipitation trace YEAR AGO Maximum 35 Minimum 19 BULLETIN SEEK AMERICAN CONFERENCE Washington United States Saturday announced plans to seek a meeting of the foriegn ministers of the 21 American republics to discuss joint action in the western hemisphere dnrinr the present emergency A Gift From You Will Help This to Grow Into Full Sized Treel 600 400 2CXT 180CT 160CT 140CT izcxr 1775 200 lQI 100 300 100 5M 00 5110 I5WI lOfl 500 lltfl 1000 3330 5M 500 SOfl OBTED GiobeGatetle News Photo graphic Enirarinr Depart ments The HIT IMS rna Kelly West Haven Circle Ken and Ben K B Circle Valeda study Club Monroe Jr Hiih P T A TylerRyan Furniture Co Cheer Dollar W S C S Bock Fulls Methoflis Church Mrs Esther Hildreth Kenselt Lew arid Almedi Just a Cement Worker Friend Hanf ord JLadies Aid Barb and Kalph SeTenthday Adveritisl Junior Dorcas Society From Tuesday Dinner Club Manly Bath Hvmemakers Club THE JJAYS TOTAL i 10725 TOTAL TO DATEI 73629 SUM YET NEEDED ji26371 We Fell Down on Our First Goal Folks ELL WE DIDNT QUITE MAKE IT A goal of had been set f or t h e Christinas cheer Fund gifts up to noon on Sat urday and as will be noted from the list above we fell short of that mark by a margin of approx imately That of course means there will have to be a little more spirit and speed in the giving during the remaining days The solicitation will come formally to a close at 2 oclock p m next Saturday Dec 23 Perhaps youve wondered why or several days a group contribu tion from some GlobeGazette de partment has led off the list This s to assure that it isnt for special publicity or boasting though we are proud of the showing The real reason is to clinch the point that WE BELIEVE IN OUR OWN PRODUCT We are not ask ing YOU to do what we are not willing to do ourselves And now it develops that we did little Jo Ann Faye Ostrander of Buffalo Center a wrong in our last issue We listed the contents of ler piggy bank contribution as 267 A recount revealed We missed 2 dimes it seems Who can match Jo Ann Faye lor sacrificial giving Theres no ime to waste Six giving days and tl26371 to go Either bring your contribution to the GlobeGazette office or mail it to Christinas Cheer Fund Mason City Partial Price Controls Imposed President at PC SANTA CLAUS IN packages are distributed to battleworn marines of the 7th regiment near Koto m North The home folks who sent the packages may not get their Christmas mail on time because of a wildcat strike which has tied up railroad facilities Yanks in UN Gives Up to Chinese North Korean Refugees in Steady Stream to Beachhead By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Allied beachhead loices aban doned Hamhung Saturday to the Chinese reds pounding against them in masses of sea wave at tacks The defenders withdrew from the wrecked industrial city into a tight ring around Hungnam port on thesea of Japan ff milesto the southeast Demolition charges blasted the heartof Hamhung before the pull out Terrorstricken North Korean refugees swarmedby tens of thou sands across frozen fields and down roads toward the allied beachhead As the last American soldierleft Hamhung a red Korean flag flapped out over one house According to Plan Field dispatches indicated the withdrawal was made according to planinto defenses in depth to the shore The citylay open to Chinese communists who watched from outlying ridges as demolitions cas caded towering clouds of black smoke intothe sky Then the Chinese swarmed into the Hamhung suburbs The Chinese pressed allied de fenders into their shrinking beachhead with attacks that over ran forward positions by sheer weight of manpower masses They are throwing great groups of people in columns at one point in our Gen H Spule said It is the same sea wave tactic they used in China to rout Chi ang Kaisheks nationalists They try to overrun one parti cular position Its a ferocious at tack They blow bugles and whis tles and suddenly strike in such numbers they are bound to over run some of us Stick and Kill You just have got to kill them Thats the only and kill them Soule is commander of the U S 3rd division Its American Puerto Rican and South Korean infantrymen with their backs to the sea are defending the tiny U S 10th corps toehold in the Ham hungIIungnam port area An army security blackout con tinued blanket reports of allied Higher Tax LongerWork Week Due Selective PriceWage Controls an Initial Step in New Program By JACK BELL Washington Tru man put productionspeeding in flationcurbing machinery in mo tion Saturday behind a rearma ment program aimed at forcing Russia to choose peace instead of war As a 1st steptoward rapid ex pansion to full mobilization if that becomes necessary Mr Truman announced he is declaring a na tional emergency calling upon ev ery citizen to put aside his per sonal interests for the good of the country For members of two more na tional guard units that meant a call to active servicein January For young men steppedup draft inductions were in order on shortcut road to a 3500000man armed force For the man onjhe street Mr Truman said in a radio speech Friday night thenew accelerated program involves selective price wage controls on defense and of livingitems higher taxes loa ger work days in factories and on AP Wirephoto HAMHUNG ABANDONED AS WARSHIPS AID BEACH HEAD forces Saturday abandoned Ham andpulled back into a defense line ring ing the port of Hungnath Defenders said Chinese reds arrows were using sea wave attacks Warships stand ing off Hungnam blasted reds at points indicated by blast symbols Main red attacks were from north and northwest roops notengaged in combat oper ations For the 3rd straight day the Chinese have thrown thrusting at acks against the allied line prob ng for a weak spot Staff officers said the big Chinese red offensive aimed to knock out the 10th corps may come ivithinthe next 48 hours While doughboys fought off com munist assaults or crouched in nowlined foxholes awaiting at ack the navys big guns pounded ommunist troops swarming along he coastal roads converging on Hungnam Ships Hurl Steel Gunfire from the allied fleet lad not been mentioned the last day or so in field dispatches But again the warships moved up and down the coast hurling steel at the enemy Carrierbased warplanes buzzed out in murky weather and hit ront waves of 112000 Chinese red roops massed against the beach icad Ground forces fought oil 3 pre dawn attacks Saturday The reds hit hear Orb 6 miles northwest of Hamhung and Chigyong 6 miles southwestof Hamhung A 10th corps spokesman said the attacks are being contained and described the situationas not disastrous Army engineers destroyed great stores of supplies to keep them from falling into communist hands Associated Press Correspondent Stan Swinton reported from the beachhead that some members of one of the two platoons cut off Friday by the Chinese returned to allied lines Friday night The tired survivors drifted back to the division during the night across nomansland DFES OF LEUKEMIA Des Neal Toussaint 8 son of Mr and Mrs Morris Toussaint of Des Moinet died of acute leukemia Saturday at his homeSteven had been ill since Oct 12 He was a 3rd grade student at Hubbell school He warned not be allowed wifli violations of holdrthelineprice standards He called on striking railroad yard workers to return to their jobs saying that rail stoppages had slowed industry and added to the countrys Wilson in Charge The president put General J3ec tncs Charles E Wilson in charge of an office of defense mobiliza tion giving him responsibility for directing production procure ment transportation and economic stabilization It would be Wilsons job to see that within a year thjs United States is turning out planes atS times the present rate of produc step up to somewhere be tween 18000 and24000 planes a year compared with the 100000 top production during World war Mr Truman promised a 4fold increase in combat vehicles in cluding tanks and times as much electronic equipment as is now being turned out To start this speedup the house shouted its approval Friday of a military fund bill Senate passage is expectednext week Military officials saidthey will go back to congress for at least more to spend before June 30 uppihg the year total to about Congressional leaders general ly approved the presidential meas ures But some of the lawmak ers said they dont go far enough fast enough Grimly Mr Truman told the na tion The future of civilization dei pends otfwhat we we do now and in the months We Pull Together Let no aggressor think we art divided he said Our great strength is the loyalty and fellow ship of a free people We pull gether when weare in Citing the nations grave dan ger the president saidthere is no hiding thefact that commu nists have won1 a military ad vantage in Korea He said they had proved there they are now willing to the world to the brink of a general war to get what they want Mr Truman saidthat war not inevitable but he ruled appeasement to avoidIt Instead he said the free nations must create military enough to convince the communist rulersthat they cannot fain by aggression Few in congress quarreled With that aim But several advocated even stronger meamrti than the president planned among them acrosstheboard price and wage controls The president said that the eminent u starting at to im post price controls upon a m of materials and products Mid will be   

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