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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: November 27, 1950 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - November 27, 1950, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME MASON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE THI NIWSPAPEft THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS HOME EDITION VOL LVfl AMOdated and United Press Full Five Cents Cosy MASON CUT IOWA MONDAY NOVEMBER 27 1950 This Paper Consists ot Two One Mans Opinion A Radio Commentary W EARL HALL Managing Editor A Visit With Some Top Brass I have just returned from a week in Atlanta Ga where I at tended and participated in the an nual national conference of the Associated Press Managing Edi tors association We talked a lot of that wasnt the most interesting or most profitable part of our sessions Some very important people were on our program And differ ent from some important people Ive met they were interesting as well as important The two I have specially in mind at this moment are Averell Harriman the special adviser to President Truman often referred to as our roving ambas sador and Gen Omar Bradley topranking man in the United States army Both Harriman and Gen Brad ley started out with formal ad dresses which have been amply covered by the press Then each of them by prior arrangement and as a condition of their visitwith us submitted to questioning by some 500 hardboiled managing editors representing papers rang ing in size from 5000 circulation to more than a million Dean Acheson Eulogized In the questioning no punches pulled although in the case of Mr Harriman there was a stipulation that his answers should be off the record Thats an ex pression of low standing with the ordinary newspaper editor or re porter and especially when it emanates from one engaged in public business The one exception to the off the record rule in the interrogat ing of Mr Harriman had to do with his answer to the question What have you to say concerning the reports that you are scheduled to succeed Dean Acheson as sec retary of state His reply took the form of a tulogy to Mr Acheson There would be no successor to him in the foreseeable future Mr Harri man said because Mr Acheson was firmly fixed in his position By coincidence the president on the same afternoon and nearly the same hour was giving out a likestatement And this is one answer that isnt off the record Harriman concluded Bradley On the Record i Perhaps somebody had whis pered something in Gen Bradleys ear the next day when he ap peared before the room full of managing editors At any rate he announced straightway that his formal talk would1 be followed by a question and answer period all of which would be on the rec ord There may be some questions I cant answer he added If so Ill say so very I think youll understand the rea sons The formal addresses of both Harriman and Bradley followed pretty much the same pattern They added up to these main points 1 America has no choice she must make herself militarily strong because communism knows no other kind of argument 2 Both took the position that while the world is at crisis an other world war is not inevitable It is within the capabilities of the United States to prevent a third World use Mr Har rimans words 3 There is a pronounced wish on the part of the United States ranging close to the realm of ap peasement to avoid a conflict with communist China Chat With Stalin Recalled One of the high spots of the Harriman talk was his recollec tion of a talk with Josef Stalin in the time just before Germanys capitulation Stalin observed that Hitlers failure to reach his goal bottomed mostly on his impa tience I must have smiled Harri man observed because Stalin quickly added I see you smile But I will not make the same And now I think were ready to move into the questions and an swers following the half hour ad dress by Gen Bradley during which he frankly admitted that our known stock of atomic bombs had been the principal deterrent to an allout aggression by you know who A Reportorial Study Let me reconstruct the scene for you Here was Americas one most important military man say ing in effect to the nations top flight newshawks What you like to know5 Ask me any questions you wish Under such circumstances the questions asked become almost as interesting as the answers given Lets go NO 1 Why Is American concerned primarily witH Europe BRADLEY Because we feel we have a better chance to strengthen our friends there We tried you know to build friends in Asia with poorer luck But dont for get we are also helping in CONTINUED ON PAGE 2 Disaster Threatens Allied Center AP Wirephoto EVER HAVE A STEAMBOAT IN YOUR BACK YARD excursion boat City of New York which runs from Manhattan to Keensburg N J during warm weather was driven ashore at Keyport N J after winds of near hurricane force broke it loose from its winter mooring in Raritan bay a mile away State Agencies Ask Increase Des Moines of Iowas largest state agencies asked Mon day for a total increase of 054 ayear in appropriations for the next biennium The board of control and con servation commission presented their 195153 budgets to Gov Wil liam S Beardsley and State Comptroller Ray Johnson The governors budget message to the legislature next January will be based on departmental hearings how under way Combined askings of the two agencies totaled a year1 The 1st 21 ofthe 52 agencies heard last week asked a net in crease of But that in cluded none of the larger agencies the board control requested annually lor support of the 14 institutions under its jurisdiction for thetwo years be ginning next July 1It has been a year in this biennium The board asked also for 774997 for the next two years for capital improvements new build ings and such It got a total of 000000 for similar purposes from the 1949 legislature Sports Bulletin BOSOX SIGN BOUDREAU Boston The Boston Red Sox announced Monday that Lou Boudreau manager of the 1948 world champion Cleveland In dians has accepted terms and will join the team as a Weather Report FORECAST Mason Partly cloudy Mon day night and Tuesday Low Monday night about 8 above Warmer Tuesday High Tues day about 32 Iowa Partly cloudy through Tuesday withnortherly winds 1015 MPH Low Mondaynight 812 in the north 1420 in the south portion High Tuesday 30 40 Further outlook Mostly cloudy Tuesday night and Wed nesday with a narrow band of snow extending from northwest to southeast through northern and eastern Iowa Low Tuesday night 1824 High Wednesday 2630 Minnesota Partly cloudy Monday night and Tuesday not much change in temperature Low Monday night zero to 10 above High Tuesday 20 north 2530 IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics for the 24 hours ending at 8 a m Monday Nov 27 Maximum 25 Minimum 10 At 8 a nu 10 YEAR AGO Maximum 45 Minimum 25 GlobeGazette weather statistics for the 24 hours ending at 8 a m Sunday Nov 26 Maximum 24 Minimum 14 At 8 a m 15 Precipitation trace snow YEAR AGO Maximum 27 Minimum 20 236 Deaths Blamed on Atlantic Section Storm By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS The storm which mauled the whole northeastern section of the nation with record fury over the weekend had van ished Monday but grief human misery and industrial paral ysis lingered on At least 236 deaths were blamed on the devastating winds along the Atlantic seaboard and the heavy snow which fell as lar south as Mississippi and Alabama Damage in New England alone was estimated at a day The snow at with threat ened floods expected to a d d to the cost Most of western Pennsylvania and northern Ohio still were digr snow which brought business to avirtual halt in such cities as Pittsburgh Cleveland Columbus Akron Youngstown and Dayton Worst Wind Ever The wind which hammered parts of the Atlantic coast with a force of as much aslOS miles an hour at tunes was described by the weath er bureau as the worst ever to hit that region It left many areas still without power service Monday and thousands still shivering with out heat or lighting Losses to boat owners were the heaviest since the 1938 hurricane The blow was accompariied by torrential rains which had sent some New England their banks Some others were threatening to overflow New York City harvested a 25day water supplyThe city reservoir trapped 25000000000 gallons building up a needed reserve sup ply Resumption ofnormal business in the snowbound sections of Pennsylvania and Ohio still was I not in sight Monday Colleges Close Transportation facilities were too crippled to carry sufficient workers to their jobs Many schools including Penn State col lege Bucknell Juniata Pittsburgh university Duquesne university and Carnegie Tech in Pennsyl vania all were closed for the day at least AlLpublic and parochial schools remained closed in Pittsburgh the snowfall measured a record 27 inches Mayor David Lawrence declared a state of emergency in the city and ap pealed to all but essential workers tostay off their jobs and help clear the citys side streets U S Steel corporation Western Electric cor poration and the H J Heinz com pany told their thousands of em ployes to stay home Allbus service in the citywas snowbound and only partial trol ley service had been resumed Monday With more snow forecast for Monday Gov James H Duff de clared an emergency in 17 western counties and declared Monday and Tuesday legal holidays there so that the banks could remain closed The shutdown in Ohio was more widespread There too banks and schools remained closed and trans portation stalled as crews bored through snow drifts as deep as 23 feet in some places in clearing the highways Gov Frank J Lausche also urged motorists to stay off the streets and declared Monday a permissive legal holiday so that banks and other financial institu tions could remain closed More Than 20 Inches The cost of industrial shutdowns in Cleveland alone was estimated a fallthere was more than 20 inches Only af ew buses are operating Nothing more than light snow flurries was predicted for Monday In Columbus wherethe snow iall was only about 12 inches 88 large factories announced shut downs for the duration andall schools arid most stores were closed Snowdrifts in some places were 5 feet deep Iii CincinnatiAkron Youngs town and Dayton nearly all the schools were closed Many stores arid plants also closed in Youngs town and in Cincinnati the Fisher Body company shut down Ohio university at Athens Deni son Kent State and Capital col leges suspended classes until Wed nesday Indict Browder for Contempt Washington Browder one timeNo 1 American commu nist andvS other persons were in dicted Monday on charges of con tempt of congress The indictments were Biased on the refusal of the 6 to answer questions asked by congressional committees or to give requested information Browder Vanderbilt Field and Philip JJaffe were ac cused of contemptuously refusing to answer questions during a senate investigation of cpmmu nistingovernment Dr Edward A Rumely execu tive secretary of the committee for constitutional government and two others were indicted for refusing information asked by a house lobby investigating com mittee The others were Joseph P Kamp executive vice chairman of the constitutional educational league and William L Patterson executive secretary of the civil rights congress Conviction for contempt of con gress is punishable by up to a years imprisonment and DIES OP INJURIES Des Moines Ziems 25 or Badger died in a hospital here Sunday of injuries suffered last week in an auto accident near Fort Dodge SAME meant IB i Report Russ Troops in Move South Shifting of Old Jap Army Mongolian Reds Is Rumored By PETER KALISCHER Seoul Korea to 9 soviet divisions totaling 150000 men were reported moving toward the northeast Korean border be low Vladivostok Monday South Korean Home Minister P O Chough passed along the report to newsmen but said he could not vouch for its reliability An 8th army spokesman refused comment The report originated with some Chinese prisoners and a North Ko rean informant captured close to the Manchurian border who said he had been told of the Russian troop movements by a soviet gen eral named Vasiliev in Harbin Manchuria Surrendered To Russia These sources said the soviet troops included two Mongolian di visions and about 50000 Japanese soldiers from the old Kwantung army which surrendered to the Russians in 1945 Chough a graduate of Columbia university said he had no infor mation on Japanese troops But he said he had received reports that Kwantung army staff officers were helping direct communist forces in North Korea They know North Korea better than anybody even the Chinese he said They had been preparing for war with Russia in that area for 10 years The 8th army spokesman said reports of Japanese staff officers in North Korea is an old story which could not be confirmed Re garding Japanese troops he added Thousands of Japanese soldiers who were taken prisoner by the Russians are still unaccounted for 300000 Japs Gen Douglas MacArinur has charged that 300000 Japanese tak en prisoners during Russias 8day warwith Japan neverwere re patriated or otherwise accounted for Both Chinese and soviet propa ganda broadcasts have countered that MacArthur is using Japanese troops in Korea but his spokesman has categorically denied it Says U S Passed ABomb Chance By CHARLES CORDDRY United Press Aviation Writer Washuiffton UR The United States passed up a chance early in the Korean war to blast massed communist forces with atomic bombs presumably because of moral and diplomatic conse quences Authoritative sources revealed Sunday that the army and air force proposed simultaneously that Abombs be used against Korean reds At the time the enemy was concentrated in a small area near the town of Suwon The joint chiefs of staff decided against the move President Tru man whose approval is required before atomic weapons can be used was not consulted Feared World Sympathy Although the joint chiefs motives were not disclosed it was believed they feared that world sympathy might go out to the reds at a time when the United Stateswas seeking universal support for the United Nations stand in Korea Another factor was that the war was in an early stage when the target presented itself and few if any military authorities foresaw the impending defeats for U S infantry before a defense line fi nally was established and held The proposed atomic target was a triangular piece of fairly flat territory with the town of Suwon at its apex The triangle was about 25 miles long on each side and several communist divisions were massed within Ideal Target The reds presented an ideal tar get from the viewpoint of U S military men who say the Abomb can be used as a tactical weapon to wipe out enemy field troops An estimation of the number of Abombs that would have been necessary to achieve the maximum damage is not possible because the communists were not distributed throughout the triangle However on the basis of a later attack on enemy troops near the Han river with conventional ex plosives more than 20 Abombs probably would have been needed for a saturation bombing of the 312square mile triangle BANKS PRESENT GIFTS DCS Moines banks have presented a gift of to the Drake university dormitory campaign fund Fred Bohen chair man of the board of trustees has announced The campaign is for to build 3 new dormi tories and a central dining hall for women AP Wirephoto UN OFFENSIVE red attacks Monday threatened complete collapse of the UN drive to end the war Reserve units were rushed to bolster a sagging 30 mile section of the front U S marines started a drive from the Changjin reservoir B in an effortto relieve pressure on other allied troops For the 2nd1 time in a month the U S 24th division has been forced to give up Chongju Black arrows indicate UN positions open arrows locate red counterattacks Truman Prods Congress on Rent Control By WILLIAM F ARBOGAST Washington IP Congress re convened Monday for a short lame and got a prod from President Truman to extend rent v controls and vote statehood J or Alaska and Hawaii Butmostof talkinjf with newsmen said frank they2 did not be accomplished in the few weeks remaining new congress elected Nov 7 takesover prhJan 3 vt Asks Alaskan Statehood Republicans who will have in creased in the new congress obviously were in a mood toput off everything except emer gency legislation until the 82nd congress meets Mr Truman sent a letter tothe capital askinga 90day extension of the rent control program which expires Dec 31 inmost cities He plugged for statehood for Alaska and Hawaiiat a conference with democraticcongressional leaders In linewith Mr Trumans wishes the leaders made statehood for Alaska the 1st order of busi ness for the senate At the same time howeveran agreement was reached to lay that measure aside temporarily when ever there are appropriations or other e m erg en cymatters to handle If the Alaskameasure goes through statehood for Hawaii will be next on thedocket Senate Adjourns The schedule was outlined to reporters by Senate Democratic Leader Lucas 111 aftenthe white house huddle of the partys leg islative leaders just ahead of the opening gavel The early plan was for Senator OMahoney DWyo to put in a motion at 2 pm to takeup the Alaska issue but the senate ad journed at putting off action until Tuesday Roofing Noils Found Scattered at Deere Plant DCS Moines nails were found scattered around the two main gates to the John Deere Des Moines works near Ankeny Monday morning a company offi cial reported The nails werefound by com pany guards whenthey opened the gates in advance of the8 oclock shift They covered ap proaches to the gates Marvin M Schmidt vice pres ident of the Deere Manufacturing Co said another gate was opened and early arriving cars were directed to it By the time most cars arrived a path had been swept clear to the main gates he said A magnet was to be used later to clear the roads The Deere plant was closed from Sept 1 to Nov 15 by a strike involving 7 Deere factories in Iowa and Illinois The plant here re opened Nov 15 despite the strike Company officials said more men returned to work Monday Union officials said the number returning was fewer than last week Schmidt estimated about a keg of nails had been scattered at each gate and said in some places they were piled to about an inch in depth Chinese Reds in 1st Showing at UN Debate By TOM OCHILTREE Lake Success ff Chinese com munist representatives made their 1st appearan ce before a Unitec Nations body Monday while the soldiers of their government were locked UN troops reds matic vappeararice the genera assembly s political committee as Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Y Vishinsky was elaborating oh Rus sian charges that the United States was guilty of aggression againsl China U S Delegate John Fos ter Dulles countered with a charge that Russia was trying by every means to poison the friendship oJ the American and Chinese people Simultaneously the assemblys special political committee debated broad principles of representation A decision on that point is ex pected to determine whether the reds or the nationalists will occupy Chinas seats in the United Na tions f Asks Condemnation Vishinsky accused the United States of transforming Formosa last stronghold of the Chinese na tionalists into a military base and of clamping a naval blockade on the island He introduced a resolution calling on the general assembly to condemn the Ameri can action and j for the United States tolifttheblockade Dulles denied there was a block ade He said only 44 members of the American military establish ment were on the island The American delegate noted that the Chinese communists on their ar rival in New York Friday had spoken of the old friendship of the Chinese and American peoples He said he was confident that friend ship in the future will determine the present issue The Chinese reds were dressed in conventional western business suits Their theatrical entrance produced a stir of excitement in the committee room Vishinsky interrupted his speech while they were being seated He welcomed Hsiuchuah head of the Chi nese red delegationand wished him success Greeted by Russians A blue and white name plate with the name Repub lic of China was placed on the desk before the reds by the UN After the meeting Vishinsky and Soviet Deputy Foreign Minister Jakob A Malik shook hands with Wu Nationalist Chinas T F Tsiang glanced up only briefly when the Chinese reds arrived After the session he remained seated with his aides until the reds had left the room Chinese Roll Back ROK Troops Yank 24th Division Retreats to Protect Flanks From Reds FROM WIRE SERVICES A savage counterattack by 20000 Chinese tore a 12 mile bole in the center 9f the United Nations NorthKorean line Monday threatening a major military disaster A U S 9th corps man said the line held by tha South Korean 7th arid 8th di vision s disintegrated al lowing an estimated two red divisions to pourthrough the gap between Tbkchoti and Yongwon near the center of the Korean Fate Not Known Nothing was known of the fate of the two South Korean divisions United Press Correspon dentPeter Kalischer at 8th army headquarters said that within 48 hours theioptimis tically proclaimed home for Christmas offensive had boomer anged into the worst setback yet suffered by UN forces in Korea It brought forth a Miold the line at all costs order from8th Army Commander Lt Gen Walton H Walker Kalischer reported i Communist units were seeping through the Republic division line to the eastof Ghohg ju v Lose Choofju Twice This was the 2nd time in a month the24th been forced to give upChongju All alpng thehbrthwejfeffdnt hard pressed United attempted to ifnpact of a violent communist counterattack v1 That Long Black Animal Sighted Called a Dog Des Moines long black animal that sent panther con scious police racing to the scene in 3 squad cars was reported early Monday inside the city limits But after a check of tracks of ficials said the animal probably was a big black dog The catlike black animal has been reported in various parts of Polk county north and south of the city but not until Monday had it been seen in the city A 1st corps spokesman the situation as quite A P Correspondent Don White head with the U S 25th division sized up the situation this way The big United Nations offen sive to bring an earlyend to the Korean war was threatened with complete collapse Monday Thii was the stark reality of thesitua tiba after 48 hours of savage fight ing and North Korean red troops have dealt a shinning blow to Unrated Nations forces The of fensive that rolled forward for two days has been stopped cold UN troops are on the defensive after giving up most of their gains Reserves Rushed Up Reserve units Americans British and Turks were rushed up to bolster a sagging 30mile east ern section of the winding 80 mile front stretching inland from the Yellow sea The front runs from 40 to 60 miles south of the Manchurian border An estimated 130000 most of them Chinese in quilted winter uniforms began the counteras sault late Saturday night Republic of Korea troops and the U S 2nd and 25th divisions bore the brunt of the attack which continued with increasing fury Sunday night Casualties Heavy Field dispatches allied casualties Correspondent Whitehead said the reversal in battle fortunes came with startling suddenness and the 8th army is battling to hold the southward surge of red troops is no chance of offensive action on this front until the red attack has been halted and a firm new line established he added Only in the northeast were al lied advances reported But red re sistance in some sectors there was stiffening Mason Cityan Shot by Own Gun Condition Good Shot by a blast from his own shotgun while hunting with two companions Sunday Jack Ream 15yearold Mason City youth was described asbeing in good condition by Mercy hospital at tendants Monday Pellets from a 410 shotgun em bedded in Reams chest as he evi dently dropped the weapon while hunting northeast of the city He underwent surgery to have the pellets removed from around his ribs His companions his brother Jerry Ream 13 and John Lowe 15 hailed an unidentified motorist who took the injured youth to the hospital He is the son of Mr and Mrs LeRoy Ream 607 Connecticut S E   

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