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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: November 20, 1950 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - November 20, 1950, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME CITY GLOBEGAZETTE THI MIWSPAPIft THAT MAKIS ALL NORTH 10 WAN J NII6HIORS VOL LVU AnocUtcd and United Full Flvt MASON CITY IOWA MONDAY NOVEMBER 2C Paper Consists of Two M One Mans Opinion A Radio Commentary If W EARL HALL Managing Editor Were Learn i ng Aboiit Money the Hard Way TNthe next few months a grea many Americans will be dig ging down into their strong boxe and noting the maturity dates on their government bonds purchasec about 10 years ago They that interest ceases at maturity The next step of course will be cashing the bonds And heres where all of us are going to be given an impressive lesson abou the nature of our medium of ex change known as money The fundamental truth to be im pressed on us is that money and wealth are not one and the same thing More than that were going to discover that money isnt ever a reliable measure of wealth We were promised that the bond purchased for a decade ago would grow to a face value o The 100 dollars promised us will be there when we present the bond for conversion into cash Ouch What a Bump this is where the les ion takes on a painful well discover that the we realize from the bond at this time will not buy as much of any known commodity as the we paid for the bond 10 years ago would While the interest on our in vestment has been adding to our original investment the sweep of inflation has been practically doubling the dollar priceon jusl about everything that we buyto day Its only in the retirement oJ contracted several years ago that those cashing in their war bonds are able to get anything like full value from then dollars 2 Kinds of Inflation The principal force at play in all of thisof course is inflation There are two kinds of inflation and uncontrolled China and Germany have been victims of uncontrolled inflation Up to this time in our country there has been a substantial mea sure Of control in our inflationary movement What lies ahead is a matter of serious concern r In W ftllyja shortage of goods and serv ices to Lbe purchased aburiSarice of mbrieyftfsuully w think in terms of high prices but it would be more to the point if our thinking was in terms of cheap dollars Like a Toy Balloon As weve an infla tion or a deflaiton can be arti ficially created by a government When the United States 17years ago went off the gold standard it was an act of deliberate in flation As somebody has pointed out the business of inflating the cur rency is much like blowing up a toy balloon The trick is toblow it up far enough to make us all happy but not so far that it will explode Back in those days of 1933 the relationship between the dollar and commodities made the dollar oppressively expensive With re spect to certain items of food stuff the dollar of then would buy approximately 10 times as much as the dollar of today Down the Toboggan Assuming the 1939 dollar to have been worth 100 cents in terms of the cost of and thats just an arbitrary dollars value at the end of World war II in 1945 had dropped to 77 cents At the outbreak of the Korean war last June the value of the dollar as compared with the 1939 dollar was down to 58 cents and in the period since then therehas been another decline of a cent And the end isnt yet As a matter of fact our un checked inflation stands as one of the greatest threats facing our country today second should say to the external threat posed by Russian communism and its designs on world domination War Costs High Too The extent to which dollar costs for war equipment has risen in the 9 years since the start of World war II is reflected in these price rises When that war began it cost to clothe and equip a recruit now it costs A B17 bomber cost a B36 today costs million A light tank used to cost now one costs 000 More and more too its being driven home to our people that there can be no adequate provi sion for the future without a stable currency This is true of those who seek to prepare for the rainy day through savings or insurance and its true of those under the gov ernmentmanaged social security tent As an example of what is meant here a pension of a month is required today to purchase goods and services buy 10 years ago What will it take in I960 A Call for Courage That question poses too many Imponderables for precise answer But this much can be said If the increase in the CONTINUED ON PAGE 2 Rent Curb Extension Requested Washington ff Chairmai Spence DKy of the hous banking committee said Monday that President Truman want legislation at the short session o congress to extend rent contro until March 31 1951 Mr Trumans idea Spence to reporters after a white house cal is to get the brief extender now and then give the new congres opportunity to explore in Janu ary the whole question of ren controls in order to decide what needed in the future The law as now written expire Dec 31 1950 except in commu nities which voluntarily keep th curbs for 6 more months House Group Turns Deaf Ear to By WILLIAM F ARBOGAST Washington ff House ways and means committee democrats refused Monday to hear testimony on a republicanproposed substi tute for the administrations 000000000 excess profits tax plan By vote of 15 to the party division on the committee the jroup rejected a motion by Rep Reed of NewYork that business men witnesses be allowed to give their views on alternative pro posals 5 Substitute Flan Reed top republican on the committee has proposed a substi ute plan that would let a tax payer compute his excess profits ax by applying a 27 per cent tax on normal net income and a per cent surtax on excess income over The administration proposes a 75 per cent tax on profits deter mined to be excessive when com pared with 19461949 earnings Mondays committee vote re iterated a previous ruling thai witnesses must confine their tes timony to excess profitstaxation Within that limitation business spokesmen opposing an excess profits tax have confined their estimoriy to suggestions dn how theremustblbrie A M Trttlmony Reed made his motion as Charles J Sligh Jr chairman of taxation committee of the Na tional Association of Manufactur ers started to testify The is opposing excess jrofits taxation on the grounds H s unworkable inflationary and unfair The association favors fixing he standard corporation income ax rate at 38 per 18 per cent normal and 20 per cent sur ax and adding to that itax lia Jility an emergency defense tax of 20 to 30 per cent Shgh said the N A M plan vould produce fully as much as would the administra iori plan and would be more vorkable BUY DOCTOR A CAR Wesley two days after Dr Lee O Snooks auto was wrecked in an accident residents f Wesley and the surrounding area took up a collection large enough to buy hima new car The own was without a doctor for everal years and didntwant to un a risk of losing Dr Snook Weather Report FORECAST lason City Clear and cold Mon day night Low Monday night near 5 above Partly cloudy and not quite so cold Tuesday High Tuesday 30 to 32 owa Clear and cold Monday night Low 5 to 15 above In creasing cloudiness and not so cold with south to southwester ly winds 12 to 15 MPH Tuesday High Tuesday 28 to 35 Further outlook Wednesday snow flur ries and turning colder Low Wednesday morning 25 to 28 High Wednesday 25 to 35 Thursday partly cloudy and continued cold Minnesota Increasing cloudiness Monday night Not quite so cold west and north portions Tues day cloudy and not quite so cold with light snow north and west central portions Low Monday night zero to 5 above north 5 to 15 above south High Tuesday 20 to 25 north 25 to 33 south IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics or the 24 hours ending at 8 a m londay Maximum J4 Minimum 7 At 8 a m 8 iTEAR AGO Maximum 60 Minimum 29 GlobeGazette weather statistics or the 24 hours ending at 8 aml unday Maximum 55 Minimum 24 At 8 a m 24 fEAR AGO Maximum 40 Minimum 33 Reach Compromise Settlement in National Phone Walkout New York than 33000 telephone employes return to work across the country Monday under compromise settlements that ended their 11day strike against units of the huge Bell Telephone system The agreements were reached Sunday in New York and Detroit where federal mediators had been seeking peace in the pay and con tract dispute The big break came here at the end of a 25hour marathon bar gaining session between Bells Western Electric companyand di vision 6 of the C I O Communi cations Workers of America rep resenting 11000 equipment in stallers Parallel Settlements Within a few hours parallel set tlements were announced here be tween Western Electric and 5000 maintenance and warehousemen in division 18 in Detroit between the Michigan Bell Telephone com pany and 17000 members of C W A division 15 and in Haver tiill Mass between Western Elec tric and 700 division 68 plant workers The companies both are sub sidiaries of the American Tele phone and Telegraph company the parent Bell corporation A T T said that aside from some local interruptions it main tained nearly normal service throughout the strike The union claimed a strike vic tory The companies called the settlement fair although costly in the Michigan dispute n the compromise both sides ac ually receded from their hard andfast strike positions Accept Lesser Sum In the key Western Electric dis pute the union had demanded a i5cent hourly raise but acceptec a series of increases from 9 to 14 cents These averaged by com pany figures 113 slightly better than Western Elec xics last offer of 11 j cents Pre vious wages averaged from to an hour The union came closer to its wishes in length of contract ac cepting a 15month term insteac of the oneyear pact it desired The union also won some other issues Western Electric said its raises would cpst about year Michigan Bell said its in creases of from to a week would cost i year am ytfcnigaii months Arctic Storm Sweeps West Chicago Arctic storm swept across the midwest Mon day and the mercury plunged to subzero levels on the northern plains Ahead of the cold air mass sleet and rain rode eastward on high winds toward the Appalachians Meanwhile residents of the Da kota s dug out of a weekend snowfall that measured up to 8 inches at Garrison N Dak The temperature dropped to 8 below zero Monday morning at Bismarck N Dak Other early lows included 4 below at Fargo N Dak two below at Aberdeen S Dak 7 above at Mason City Iowa and 9 at Minneapolis It was below freezing as1 far southeast as Chicago and northern Indiana The Iowa highway patrol cau tioned motorists to take it easy as sleet and freezing rain glazed highways and caused several mi nor accidents Traffic was slowed almost to a standstill in some areas Weather forecasters in Chicago warned that winter conditions mayremain for some time also isfbrl Fire Kills One in Council Bluffs Council Bluffs swept a downtownV business block early leaving one fireman dead another injured damage esti mated at about Twentyone families were rout ed in an adjacent apartment build ng which had only slight fire damage The fireman William Cavitt ollapsed while running from the ailing wall of a burning building ie diedin ahospital Acting Fire 2apt Earl Hansen received a hip injury whenhe fell on icy steps A J Morphy one of the owners f the Morphy Drug company vhich Was not attacked by the flames but which had smoke wa er and heat damage estimated his irms loss at The blaze apparently started in 3story brick building in the 00 block of South Main street lousing Nicks tavern and the South Main Furniture company It quickly spread to an adjoin ng 4story brick building housing he Katleman Hardware company vhich carried one of the largest tocks in southwest Iowa Among plants affected by the oss of power was the Council Bluffs Nonpareil The newspaper vas enlisting the help of commer ial printing establishments un ffected bythe fire to help prepare ype for Mondays editions Cab Driver s Murdered Council Bluffs Council luffs taxicab driver was found lot to death on a road east of Council Bluffs Sunday Officials identified him as jeorge Massouris 30 parttime axicab driver and a carman for he Union Pacific railroad He had een shot 3 times in the back of he head Massouris cab was found aban Council Bluffs early unday Investigators said indications ere that Massouris had been obbed His billfold was missing ut a wrist watch still was on the ody when it was found Workers n the taxicab office said Mas ouris had about 8 or 9 dollars n his billfold when he reported or work Coroner H Stanley Woodring aid Massouris had dead everal hours when the body was ound by Charles Hytrek who ves near the scene The body as lying in a ditch along the Id Orchard road near highway Opponents of West German Army Win By BRACK CURRY Frankfurt Germany German oppo nents of the creation of a new Ger man army to bolster western de a thumping weekend election victory in the American occupation zone Voters in two states snubbed the powerful Christian democrats whc dominate the federal West Ger man government and have urged German rearmament The states of Hesse and Wuert ternbergBaden which voted Sun day for new state parliaments alsi decisively rejected Moscows poll ties in Germany With not a singl communist elected the reds suf fered their worst drubbing Vine vj Jeaafers hailedthe as avictpry fp their stand against West German rearmamerife The outcome represents aclear protestagainst the ppliciesof Fed eral Chancellor Konrad Adenauer especially on the question of re militarization said S o c i a li s Chairman WIu Knothe of Hesse Fritz Heine general secretary o the socialist party claimed the elections show the German public has lost confidence in the federa government especially because of its attitude on rearmament Heine said the socialist victory underscores our demand for new elections the West German parliament The socialists de mand the new ballot to give the people a chance to vote yes or no on the army question Yank Infantry Within 2 Miles of Manchuria Women Children Assist Pickets at Deere Plant By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS While negotiators for the strik ing C I OUnited Auto Workers union and the 7 John Deere farm equipment plants in Iowa and Il linois resumed their contract talks Monday pickets at Waterloo and continued to parade near the two reopened Deere plants in those cities The 7 Deere plants have been strikebound since Sept 1 idling 13000 workers The company re opened the Waterloo and Des Moines week in re sponse to what it described as re quests from workers who wish to return to their Temporary injunctions limiting the permissible numbers of pickets and restricting their movements were obtained last Fridayby the company in Des Moines and Wat erloo Women and children were as sisting in the picketing near the Des Moines Deere works Monday The women carried signs and stood where the highway joins roads eading toplant gates It was the 4th day the Des Moines plant has been reopened No Plans to Cut Civilian Travel Washinirton govern ment is making no plans to cur ail or allocate civilian travel Di rector James K Knudson of the defense transportation adminis ration said Sunday Knudson said on a broadcast hat the country has the best ransportation system it has ever lad in a national emergency and there are no plans presently afoot that would curtail civilian raveling But he added Of course if we get into a full icale emergency of any kind it may become necessary to handle ransportation on a priority basis That is precisely what we rying to avoid AP Wirephoto YANKS TWO MILES FROM indicates area where American forces in Northeast Korea have ad vanced to within two miles of the Manchurian border Sol id arrows indicate points on the front line where UN troops are applying pressure U S planes blasted red staging bases at Musan and Nanam bomb Open arrow indicates red column moving south which was attacked from the air California Suffers Its Worst Flood By RODERICK BEATON Cal UR California worst flood sent torrents of wate pouring through the states rich Central valley Monday Tmr deaths were reported Damag stood at Some 850 persons fled their homes The weather bureau forecas more rain Monday A weekend deluge of rain am muggy weather melted the Sierr Nevada snowpack and sen streams and rivers overflowing ir the Sacramento and San Joaquin valleys which comprise the Gen tral valleyregion Authorities believed the wors of the danger was over early Mon day as the waters began receding in many places Many evacuee began returning to their siltHllec homes But authorities feared the riv ers may rise again Sacramento county authorities reported they received 7 com plaints of looting of evacuated lomes Some communities and residen ial areas along the San Francisco bay shore were under water ina combination of high tides anc rain One community Alvarado southern Alameda county was iso ated for a time Sunday and IOC persons were evacuated One small town Piedra on the Kings river was virtually wiped out Chowchilla and Kingsburg were under several feet of water Sunday night Others damaged were Kerneville Isabella Visalia Woodville Woodlake Rosedale Woman Held in Slaying Harpers Ferry Iowa ard Garin 46 who farrned near iarpers Ferry was shot to death Sunday night and a 45 year old voman in whose home the body vas found was held Monday for questioning Sheriff William Huffman of Allamakee county said the woman s MrsClem Cassidy of Harpers Ferry wife of a railroad worker and mother of 4 children The heriff said no charges had been lied Expect to Avoid Holiday Inductions Des Moines selective ervice officials expect to avoid he necessity of inducting any nen near the yearend holidays y delivering the December quo a by midmonth Col Ralph A Lancaster serv ce director said Monday plans are set up to have the 672 men ailed up next month in camp by he 15th He said he anticipated no difficulties in meeting that chedule This months quota of 1179 is he largest of any of the 5 months or which calls have been made Colonel Lancaster said the call is icing met as far as he knows and here seemed no doubt that it vould be Decembers quota of 672 will be ollowed by a call for 668 men in anuary Red China Answers Stem From Moscow By DEWITT MACKENZIE AP Foreign Affairs Analyst Chinas xeacGou to Wash ingtons assurances tha the on Manchuria probably item more from Moscow than Beiping All evidence indicates the Chi nese communist chief Genera Mao Tzetung has entered into an alliance with the Russians to keej America indefinitely engaged in the Korean war That being so hi no longer is a free agent the Soviet Union speaks for him This scheme of course is aimec atbleeding the United States both militarily and economically there by weakening her defense againsi the communist world revolution If the plot were successful it ulti mately would give Mao a domi nant position in naturally under authority of the liuscovites He must accept dicta tion from Moscow which is the fountainhead of world commu nism There is small possibility of either Moscow or Peiping laboring under a misapprehension that America really is aiming at Man churia Even a boy playing soldier with a wooden gunwould realize Jncle Sam cant afford to geten a major Asiaticwar at his critical juncture with Russia sitting oh the sidelines and foster ing her strength Without1 detracting from the im jortance of the Asiatic zone west ern Europe must remain the vital heater for allied preparedness so ong as Russia remains aloof buildingup her great sower The weakening of allied trength in western Europe by heavy cohunitmerits in the far east would be inviting disaster To my mind the reason we are not in another world war this mo ment is because triewestern allies iold the balance of military and the oviet bloc NOT I Cl Effective Monday Nov 20 the price of the Mason City GlobeGazette delivered by carrier in Mason City and Clear Lake will be 30 CENTS A WEEK Of this increase in price your carrier salesman will re ceive an appropriate part as added compensation for his work and as an incentive to provide better service The present 25 cent weekly price was established in 1946 At that time print paper cost the newspaperconsumer per ton Since 1946 this cost has been advanced repeated ly The currently announced price on paper purchased under contract is per ton representing an advance in excess of 60 over 1946 On the open market paper costs considerably more Wages are materially higher than in 1946 and all mate rials and services used in the production of the newspaper have increased The revision in the price of the delivered newspaper is ihescapable UN Forces Make Steady Gains All Along Front By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS American infantry paced by tanks surged down asnow covered North Korean valley late Monday within two miles of the Manchurian border A 10th corps spokesman said leading units of the U S 7th division were only two miles from their goal the border town of Hyesanjin He said the troops probably would wait until Tuesday be fore pressing into the town Elsewhere on the wintry front United Nations forces made steady gains against a foe which appearsto be with drawing cautiously to build up stronger defenses against a mountain backdrop In north central Korea U S marines advanced twomiles the east shore of the vast Britain Says Russ Oppose Red China Seat By TOM OCraLTREE New York charged Monday the Soviet Union actual ly does not want theChinese com munists seated in the UnitedNa tions where they would have widecontacts with the noncom munist world Addressing the general assem bly British Minister of State Ken neth Younger said many govern ments now share Britains view of soviet motives He said soviet moves designed to give the Chinese reds represen tation in theUN are made in such a form as to assure majority op position He cited as an example Russias counter proposal to Secretary General Trygve Lies 20 year peace plan now being debated in the assembly The wording of soviet reso lution is cleverly conceived in an effort to impose on the assem bly the Russian contention that security council meetings parti cipated in by nationalist Chinas delegation are illegal Younger said Britain never could support a resolution designed to bind the assembly tosuch a position even though the British government has recognized red China Younger ex plained Changjin reservoir that feeds hydroelectric plants in rea and Chinese Manchuria The ROK Capital division con tinued its drive to the northeast towards the soviet Siberian bor der U S air supportandthe guns of the Cruiser St Paul helped the divisions right flank make a 16 mile advance beybrid Myongchon The left flank beat pff a commu ist counterattack 9 miles outside Myongchon The reds were rolling up reinforcements and supplies 3Mile Advtnee A 3mile advance by South Ko reans on the right flank of allied forces northwest front per mitted a straightening of the UN line The communists fought fur iously in this sector until Sunday The latest advance met no opposition A U S 8th army spokesman said communists appear to be preparing a mountain defense call Highest Air Battle fought Over Korea Panther Hunt Under Way in Des Moines Area Des Moines sheriffs office organized a hunt for a black panther in a residential area just north of here Monday after large fresh felinetype tracks vere found to back up the eye vitness accounts of residents Deputy Sheriff MaxiVan Rees aid 10 hunters half of them depu ies and the other half residents would go out with huntingdogs to ttempt to track down the ani mal in freshly snow Kenneth Sonderleiter private oo keeper planned to set up some kind of trap to catch the animal alive but Van Rees said were going to carry rifles Our idea is to destroy it ha aid tlW highest air bittlei in wu foucfet Kwrni by nekton and 7 KuMiaiiltallt MIG 15 jets t The navy reportinr Monday on the encounter said it took place at an altitude between 32 000 and 35000 feetor a little more than 6 miles in the air It ended quickly with the commu nist planes stceaklnr to safety across the Manchurian border Two of the red were last seen losinj altitude rapidly and trailinr smoke as they f lided across the Yalu river a navy spokesman told reporters at a Pentagon briefing Residents of the partially wooded rea about one mile from kirtsof Des Moines said they aw the animal during the past 3 lays They were not panicky icwever and planned to send heir children to school and con uct their business normally Van Rees led a small party iirough Sunday and re torted finding plenty of tracks ing for a 10mile withdrawal along parts of the front After smashing through com munist opposition outside the walled city of Kapsan the lth regiment of theU S 7th sion rolled through and pastthe city with ease The communists had set a trapJtor the oncoming allied tank column Ambiuh Spotted But communists fearful of measured more than 4 nches across Sonderleiter said hey were less than an hour old Mrs Glenn Sanborn a house vife said she saw the animal bout dusk Saturday evening when ie was out walking with her two mall sons It was running through a bunch of leaves in a she said I knewit was a panther and I screamed It seemed to travel kind of slow but it was a great big thing Martin Heitkamp said he saw the animal run through a neigh bors yard It was no big dog or cat he said Ive seen panthers before It was 6 feet long including its tail Van Rees said the hunt would be conducted as quietly as possible so as not to arouse residents fears He said he would not permit curi osity seekers in the area when the hunt was being conducted DIE AFTER GAME Iowa City persons died both apparently of heart at tacks within 45 minutes of each other at the lowaNotre Dame football game here They were Dr Earl Morgan 57 ofSioux City and Mrs Angeline Gerwe 48 of Davenport American armor jumped from thenfoxholes arid disclosed their ambush Tanks opened up on the hillsides and U S doughboys moved Sin The battle lasted but 30 minutes Sixtyfive reds were captured when the trap collapsed others fled Chinese communist prisoners have told allied intelligence of ficers they were unused to meet ing such heavy fire power nor low strafing They said their mor ale hadbeen high until they cama head on with UN Nov 5 The prisoners said the Chinese were having trouble keeping sup plied with food arid with ammuni tion for their motley collection of Russian Japanese Canadian and American weapons Manly Soldier Is Wounded Washington The defense department Monday announced the following Iowa casualties in the Korean area Killed in Army Pfc Henry M Bailey son of Mrs Dor othy M Bailey Red Oak Wounded Army Sgt Jesse J Aguilera son of Mrs Guada lupe Maria Aguilera Manly Sgt Ralph J Schetgen husband of Mrs Ethel J Schetgen Dubuque Pfc Paul J Scott grandson of Mrs Elda Scott Cedar Rapids SAME 5tT flif Si Ittfflt   

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