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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: November 15, 1950 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - November 15, 1950, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH DAILYPAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME CITY GLOBEGAZETTE THI NEWSPAMR THAT MAKiS ALL NORTH IOWANS N EI C H I 0 ft S HOME EDITION PTM ud ontttt Full LMM Wira Five CcnU Copyl MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 15 1950 This Paper oi Two Sectiowloction Enemy Throws Back Allies at 2 Points Demo Fight on Acheson i But Observers Believe I Truman Will Not Fire I Secretary of State By JOHN M HIGHTOWER Wwhinciou IP A struggle ever Bean Acheson s tenure as secretary of state appeared Wed nesday to be building up behind thescenes of the Truman adminis tration In the aftermath of last weeks democratic election reverses of ficial informants who cannot be named said that two conflicting lines of advice are being directed toward President Truman In their simplest forms these are 1 Acheson must go because he Is a political liability and 2 He must be kept in office under re publican fire because to let him go now would jeopardize the for eign policies for which he stands hurt the president politically Close Friendship At the moment there is every indication that Mr Truman does not intend to let the secretary out The president has declared his support of Acheson in the past and associates say the two maintain a close friendship based on mutual admiration Acheson himself has declared he has no intention of The argument that he should go now reportedly pressed by Ache ions critics within thedemocratic party holds that the congressional elections proved the secretary to be a political handicap that he lacks popularity if not the confi dence of much of the country and thatihe president should permit ask step aside Political observers in touch with Sentiment in the democratic na tional committee and among dem ocratic senators say foe weight of Opinion in those quarters is against Acheson Burned tor Statement The democratic politicians are laid to believe that his usefulness has been greatly impair ed by his famous yearold he would not turn against AlgerHiss Hiss had just been convicted of perjury in connection with charges of turning over secret papers to communists They contend also that Acheson has been harmed by Senator McCarthys RWis campaign allegingcommunist in fluences in the state department 11 The opposite viewpoint comes from Achesons friends in the ad ministration and particularly from some of his department associates Their argument is that republican election victories were not a re pudiation of the broad lines of American foreign policy Mr Tru man is responsible for that policy and Acheson to a large extent is its architect the president let Acheson go according to this argument he would be handicapped in continu ing 4o develop and carry out poli cies which have wide acceptance Chicago Picks Police Chief OConnor Succeeds John Prendergast Chicago The new boss of Chicagos 7000 policemen is Tim othy J OConnor 48 who rose inf the ranks from patrolman to commissioner in 23 years OConnor was named commis sioner Tuesday by Mayor Martin HKennelly who told him you are going into this job with a rec ord for honesty OConnor succeeds John C Prendergast 67 commissioner for nearly 5 years and in the depart ment for 43 years His resignation was accepted reluctantly by Kennelly who said Prendergast had asked to resign several times during the last two years The Chicago crime commission a private group has charged that although Prendergast was honest he had not demonstrated ability to stop crime or to keep the department free of connections with racketeers OConnor told reporters he had no specific plans for changes in the department which he termed the best in the country Several police captains were questioned recently by senate crime committee investigators in efforts to determine their financial condition 0ne captain Daniel Gilbert who resigned Monday told the com mittee he was worth and had made considerable money in jtock market investments and in betting on sporting events Gilbert a democrat was defeated In last weeks election for the of of Cook county sheriff and fttigned his ptyrt as chief inves tfi for the states attorney Sees Use of A Bomb Against Chinese Rjds an Eventuality By JOSEPH L MYLER Washington UPJ United States never thought of using atomic bombs against the North Korean reds but against the Chi nese As Senator Richard B Russell DGa said this week If things got serious we might have to An official close to atomicmil itary developments agreed todaj that if communist China launches allout war against the United States we could reasonably be ex pected to retaliate with our No 1 fMnnri v j We are not inviting attack we never have invited attack he said but if we are attacked nev ertheless it seems reasonable to suppose we will fight back with our biggest club Russell was talking of the pos sibility of Abombing things got serious enough Bu there is one important segment o the army that sees the atomic bomb as a potential field weapon too Study Tactical Use Heading this school is Gen J Lawton Collins army chief oi staff He disclosed last summer that the army is trying to de velop an artillery shell with an atomic warhead This work plus study of tac tical uses of existing atomic wea pons is going ahead The Abomb r in the past has been touted as primarily a stra tegic weapon against vital produc tion or transportation centers But army thinkers on the sub ject can imagineplenty of cir cumstances in which it might be a victorysaving field weapon With its large radius of almost total a mile for the obsolete models of World war Abomb they say could smash a dangerous bridgehead stop a concentrated offensive or wreck an invasion armada as i converged on a beach NotTooCortly Proponents of the Abomb as a field argue that it would be more effective than massed ar tillery and in the mathematics o war not too costly In any case if the Chinese com munists decide to date atomic retaliation by committing war upon theUnited States there would be plenty of strategic tar Sworthy of the Abomb In easy B29 range of many a J S far eastern base lies the vast Manchurian re ion which is by far the greatest n that part of the world There s the Yalu river power complex tselfAnd there are Mukden and Changchun not to mention Port Arthur and Dairen But as the official said this country hopes it never will have o dip into its steadily growing Abomb stockpile The U S army neverstarted a said Its not going o start one now Waterloo Votes Not to Extend Rent Control Waterloo IF The Waterloo ity council Tuesday night voted down 4 to 2 a motion to extend ent control hi the city 6 months after Dec 31 The action was taken after the ouncil heard a resolution by the owa State Buflding Trades coun il urging continuance of controls and read petitions signed by 592 itizens urgingdecontroland 363 urging extension of controls Weather Report FORECAST lason City Windy and cooler Wednesday night with low near 32 Fair and coldThursday with high 40 owa Cloudy windy and mild with occasional rain Wednesday night Partly cloudy sftid colder northwest and cooler southeast Thursday Low Wednesday night 30 to 35 35 to 45 southeast High Thursday 38 to 43 northwest 45 to 53 southeast Further outlook Cooler Thurs day night with low 28 to 38 Generally fair with little change in temperature Friday Saturday increasing cloudiness and warm er Minnesota Cloudy with occasion al freezing rain changing to snow Wednesday evening Cloudy with rain south portion and snow north portion Wednes day night Rain changing to snow south portion early Thurs day Cloudy occasional snow flurries entire state Thursday Little change in temperature north andcolder south Thurs day Low Wednesday night 2530 north 3238 south High Thurs day 2632 north 3238 south IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics or the 24 hours ending at 8 a m Wednesday Maximum Minimum At 8 a m Precipitation 54 45 53 Trace A f Brines Tells Editors Long War Is Here Atlanta Chinas decision to fight in Korea was directed from Moscow Associated Press Tokyo Bureau Chief Russell Brines said Wednesday Having once started Russia cer tainly will continue a program of conquest and attrition to tear us down said Brines The veteran fareastern corre spondent addressed about 500 newspaper managing editors at the 17th national convention of The Associated Press Managing Editors association The news executives spent most of the morning praise for achievements and criti cism for news report provided more than 50000000 readers The broad theme was for more digging underneath the surface more and better explanations to make the worlds news both inter esting and understandable Brines said we already have seen the starting of a prolonged war in Asia Even solution of the Korean problem would bring no peace he said Nobody in Tokyo considers Chinese intervention in Korea a Chinese decision The Chinese hate the Koreans and here they are fighting they say to protec Korea Brines continued Russia hasnt lost a man yet We can continue killing a hundrec communists for every American for many vyears and still Russia would be winning Bricks Hurled as Pickets Stop Deere Vorkers ttoioes Bricks were groups of pickets halted a sched uled backtbwork movement al the strikebound John Deere Des Moines works Wednesday and plans to seek an injunction against the picketswere announced One nonunion worker wasin jured slightly and several auto mobiles were damaged in isolated outbreaks of violence near the plant gates In a day of fastmoving action in the lengthy labor dispute these developments occurred 1 The Waterloo John Deere Tractor works announced it would reopen its doors at 7 a m Thurs day to all workers who wish to return 2 Des Moines Deere plant of ficials announced they would seek an injunction to safeguard em loyes from further violence Injunction Asked 3 Neil Garrett Des Moines at orney for a backtowork group of John Deere employes said the workers had asked him to take steps to secure a court injunction enjoining the pickets and those assisting them from interfering with or molesting these employes when they go to work and enter the John Deere premises 4 At Moline 111 negotiations Between Deere and the union con inued with no progress an AP Wlrephoto REDS ACTIVE ON TWO communists drove South Korean troops back 4 miles near Tokchon on the western front and in the extrenife northeast open ar rows launched violent assaults 90 miles fromthe soviet border latter battle UN troops did not lose any ground Along other portions of the frigid battlefront UN forces black arrows advanced slightly against negligible opposition Explosions Rock Port Flames Shoot 200 Feet Into Sky Port Arthur Tex explosions rocked aGulf Qilcom shot 200 feet into the fogladen sky JFiremen fought the ensuing fire for more than 5 hours before bringing it under control They stopped the flamesjust short of the refinery distilleries Ifthose distilleries we would have had a blast that would have been felt in Beau mont 25 miles from here a Gulf spokesman said 3 In Hospital Many refinery workmen and iremen suffered minor cuts and jruises in the explosions and fire jilt onlythe 3 seriously injured were hospitalized Flames shot from the high pressure area where the explo ions occurred to the interior of nounced No Plans 5 At Dubuquea union official said the no knowledge of employe demands that the plant e reopened M L Fraher man iger of the Dubuque plant said Wednesday a number of workers are asking if the plant is going to No reopening plans have been announced at Dubuque In Des Moines Attorney Garrett aid 3 or 4 test carloads of back employes were prevented 3y pickets from entering the plant and that the main group wishing o return consequently refrained rom approaching the gates Bans Saloon Jar Construction Washington ff The national roduction authority Wednesday anned the construction of bars nd saloons The defense rinking places agency to its added list of amusement facilities whose con truction is prohibited to conserve materials for defense Night clubs were barred by the ri g i n a 1 order Wednesdays mendment added to the list buildings or stfuc ures where the predominant busi ness carried out therein or in con nection therewith shall be the sale or consumption on the premise of alcoholic liquors The order also was expanded to nclude certain structures as well as buildings This brought under he ban golf courses swimming ools tennis courts and yacht ba ins if the construction cost ex ceeds in any 12month period he main plant A distilling unit lay directly in the path of he fire had leen shut down only ast Sunday The first explosion cause of which was not determined shook lomes throughput the area and hattered a window pane in a grocery store more than a mile away Fed by Oil Officials said the fire was fed by a crude oil product that was pretty near to being gasoline in volatility Firemen used chemi cals and other special equipment to controlthe flames No estimate was available of damage to the plant The fire destroyed atleast one pump house and several feeder lines The Gulf refinery is adjacent to a Texas company refinery where a similar blaze several weeks ago caused more than 000000 damage Retail Food Prices Drop Washington The govern ment reported Wednesday that re tail food prices droppedabout 4 per centduring the last twoweeks of October Lower prices for fresh fruits and vegetables were mainly re sponsible for the small drops were decline but reported in prices of meats poultry coffee and sugar Higher prices were re ported for eggs dairy products fish canned and dried fruits and vegetables Prices were lower for 21 foods higher for 21 and nochange was reported for 8 others covered in a bureau of labor statistics sur vey On the basis of a special sur vey of 50 food items in 8 cities the bureau estimated that on Oct 30 food prices stood at 2081 per cent of the 193539 average or than double That would be a rise of about 16 per cent since June 15 before the Koreantlight ing began Snyder Proposes 75 Per Gent Profits Tax on Corporations Washington ff Secretary of the Treasury Snyder Wednesday proposed a 75 per cent excess profitslax on corporations to raise aBvii for the expanding defense effort Snyder said he is the proposal a modified and softer version of the 85S per cent excess profits tax on World war be passed at the short sessionof congress openingNov 27 The treasury chief appeared Before the taxwriting house ways and means committee to back up Mr Trumans plea Tuesday for a profits levy retroactive to July 1 as part of a sound program of defense taxa ion The said profits are soaring under the rearmament program Prospects Not Bright The committee called in Snyder o give details on Mr Trumans request as it began hearings under a mandate for congress to try to produce an excess quickly as possible levy bill as Mrk Truman also has asked for peed but prospects for action this rear are none too bright Senti ment has been building up for ither methods of boosting govern ment revenue including further ncreases in individual income axes and ordinary corporation axes Snyder proposed that corpora ions as in World war II be given he alternative of figuring their axes through a base period earri ngs credit or an tal credit invested cap Either system would set a level f earnings on which the regular orporate income tax which anges up to 45 per cent would pply and leaveall profits inex ess of that sum subject to the 75 er cent rate Balanced Tax Essential R ef e rr ing administration lans to present a bigger and more omprehensive taxhike proposal o thenew congress that will con next Jan 3 Snyder said Aproperly designed profits tax s essential for a balanced anti inflation program since economic ontrols and higher taxes on in ividuals would be unfair unless ligh corporate profits carry their air share of the tax load May Control U S Defense Washington The nations metalusing industry may be har nessed by next July 1 under a controlled materials plan military demands mount as now foreseen a top National produc tion authority official said Wed nesday The plan contemplates complete allocation of basic met als under study willbe needed if the defense budget ap proximates to 000000000 a year it was said Manly Heischmann genera counsel ofNPA who told reporters of the plan said he did not know whether itmight involve some consumer rationing He did say the production of au tomobiles necessarily would be choked down by curbs on meta and I should think rationinj would have to be I simply do not know Figures as high as 62 billion have been used in estimates of the possible defense budget for fisca 1952 starting next July 1 In the meantime Fleischmann said there will be increasing num bers of more limited controls al locating steel and other metals for refineries power plants and other defense supporting industries as well as regulations curtailing ci vilian use of copper and other metals A 35 per cent cut in alum inum becomes effective Jan 1 Wednesday the NPA al located 10000 tons of steel month ly to build 12 new Great Lakes ore carriers and other cargo ves sels It saidthe ships would sup port the planned expansion of steelproducing plants Ancient Elk Antlers ound in Iowa Creek DCS Moines antlers of n elk that may have roamed cross this country perhaps 25000 ears ago have been found R A Collister of Liberty Center ound the antlers in Otter creek n Warren county Jack Musgrove state historical museum director said the animal may have weighed 1200 pounds or more The base of the horn known as e rosette is 4 inches across The Ik that lived in Iowa 90 or 100 ears ago had a twoandahalf or inch horn base These antlers apparently were reserved for thousands of years n gravel sand or clay Musgrove aid The action of the creek water robably uncovered the antlers ExKu Klux Klan Chief Arrested in Minneapolis Minneapolis man iden tified as theformer Old Man of the Ku Klux Klan in Indiana wanted for parole violation was appreherided Wednesday in Rob binsdale Minneapolis suburb by sheriffs deputies W H Fabriz chief of detective and civil divisions in the sheriffs office said the man was positive ly identified as David C Stephen son who once boasted he was the law in Indiana Stephenson 58 is wanted for parole violation He was sent to Indiana state prison Michigan City Ind in 1925 for a life term after being convicted of murder He disappeared from his Carbon dale 111 rooming house Aug 30 The former grand dragon of the Klan wasworking as a printer for the Post newspapers in Robbins dale the past week M O Ship ley president and general man ager of the newspapers said he gave his name as Frank Wright Six TankLed Outfits Rip Holes in ROK Une By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Red battalions smashed back South Korean troops at two widely separatedpoints on the United Nations line Tuesday night and Wednesday Attacking communists drove the Kepublic of Korea 8th division back 4 miles near Tokchon on the westernfront The attack in battalion strength began Tuesday night and continued Wednesday morning By noonthe ROK 8th had withdrawn to the south bank of the Taedong river 4 miles east of Tokchon This is on the right flank of UN western front f On the extreme northeastern P I fl fir rAI It P front 6 tankled North Korean as WIIVVn sauit battalions tore 5 holet through the ROK Capital division line late The South CIO Pickets Police for 2 Hours NonStrikers Finally Reach Their Jobs in Philadelphia Clash New York 250 pic kets fought a sporadic twohour battle with police in Philadelphia Wednesday as they tried to pre vent nonstriking telephone work ers from entering a BellTelephone company exchange After repeated the strikers picket lines permitting the nonstrikers to reach their jobs It was the 2nd successive day that pickets and police clashed in Philadelphia in violence kindled by the44state strike of telephone equipment workers Four times police reinforce ments charged circling picket lines massed outside the exchange Each time the charge opened a narrow gap in the strikersranks enabling a handful of workers to filter into the exchange The non strikers are members of an inde pendent union Defends tickets A spokesman for striking C I O Communications Workers said the pickets were with drawn because the union didnt reans counterattacked closing gaps the U S 10th corps said Hold Ground Here Violent red assaults were con tinuing in the area 90 miles south east of the sovietborder But a spokesman said no ground lost These communist attacks wert in sharp contrast to lack of op position encountered by other UTf troops advancing carefully in North Koreas bitter cold troops reached the shores of North Koreas two largest reservoirs which produce power also from Manchuria Theysent patrols inside the ancient walled city of Yongbyon and probed in front of their lines The British commonwealth 27th brigade ad Seporate Chinese From North Koreans U S 8th Army Healqturtenr Korea thebr WB pro tection captured Chinese com munist have been ten anted from their red North Korean jjtttMnen of A The Korean we at the Chinewe for entered The new flareup came as the partial coasttocoast telephone strike neared the end of its 1st week with tension mounting on aicket lines x The tension reflected the strikes1 inconclusive effect on national phone service the unbroken dead lock at the bargaining table and the huge Bell systems growing countermeasures against the walkout In addition to the original is sues of pay and contractduration iie C I O Comunications Work ers of Americanow accuses the company of a lockout and unfair abor practices It also is contest ng picketing injunctions in at east 10 states Denies Lockout The company strongly denied he lockout charge A company spokesman said long distance service was normal Wed nesday in the 14 cities where long ines exchanges are located Local service was described asslow in 10 to 45 communities In New York City for the3rd successive day shifts of non striking operators reported for vork at the companys long lines left after a few min utes They said they sent icme when they insisted they would continue to respect picket ines Pickets had been withdrawn rom the building Operators Refuse Work at Omaha Omaha telephone vorkers set up picket lines in Omaha again Wednesday and a nion spokesman 95 er cent of the girl operators re used to cross the lines A company spokesman termed lis figure way above what the acts are Service is affected owever NAVY PLANE CRASHES Page Okla twoengine avy plane crashed and burned top a heavily wooded mountain op near this small eastern Okla oma town Tuesday night killing occupants DIES AT COSSING Burlington Lind 1 89 retired Burlington con ractor died Wednesday morning Eter his auto was struck at a owntown crossing by the east ound Burlington Zephyr tered Fakchon on the northwest front 1 They found wellprepared abandoned defenses that Chinese communists recently had left them Some pointi wenT abandpnedASOhurriedlythat am munition supplies and individual packs wereileftbehind Chlnew a Ittyitery An intelligence spokesman at General MacArthurs headquarters said hadho idea why the Chinese were abandoning their sitions A U S 1st corps spokesman on the western front said the are using screen to fighfciUN troopswhile Chinese xedsJprepare stronger dey fense lines to the rear He said Chinese are reorganizing remnants of the North Korean army into effective fighting There was of why little noopposition was encountered around the great Changjin and Tujon reservoirs Defense of these two vital damt earlier had beencited as one prob able reason Chinese red troops poured into Korea Parkaclad marines wind ing through gorges so narrow that their artillery could not follow took Hagru at the southern tip of Changjin reservoir without op position To the northeast the U S 7th divisions 31st regiment hauled its guns and supplies on sleds to the northeastern shores jon reservoir 7th divisions 17thvregiment ran into some artillery mortar and rifle lire in a twomile ad vance that carried it within 28 air miles of the Manchuriaiibor der to U S tank was knocked but Cold Is the Enemy But Maj Gen David Barr di visional commander said The biggest enemy is this cold miserable subzero weather He said he wastold 6 of his men waded the Ungi river and came out with their clothing frozen SAME Itaf traffic Temperatures as low as 6l de grees above zero have frozen much of the battlefront The forecast was warmer Friday with perhaps the 1st general snowfall of the season this weekend The air war didnt wait for weather to warm up Thirty B29s firebombed Hoer yong in northeastern o re a northernmost target ofthe war An air spokesman said the com munications and military sjipply base once a major link ih Jap ans military network in Korea was left a mass of smoke and flames Hoerybng a city oJ 450000 on the Manchuritn border It is the hub o 5 highways link ing Manchuria with Korean sea ports mining awaij and the pres ent snowcovertd northeastern battlefront   

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