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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: October 27, 1950 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 27, 1950, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME MASON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE I MI NIWSPAMI THAT MAKIS ALL NORTH IOWA MS NtlCMIOtS HOME EDITION VOL LVII Pnit ind United PIMM Full LMM Wires CcnU a Copy MASON CIT1 IOWA f KID AY OCTOBER 27 1950 This Consists of Two If Mobilization Pace Eased by Military Release of Guardsmen Reservists by Next Summer Announced By JOSEPH G GOODWIN Washington armed forces appeared Friday to be eas ing off the fast mobilization pace they set following the communist invasion of South Korea There were no signs of any change in this nations announced intent to build a powerful military machine of defense against com munist pressure but there were in dications that for the time being the permanent mobilization base is nearing completion Developments pointing in that direction included 1 Secretary Pace said Thursday that the army hopes to start re leasing mobilized national guards men and reservists next summer in a program which may be com pleted before early 1952 2 The air force announced It will halt immediately the callup of enlisted reserves 3 The navy said it needs no more naval reserve airmen and that its need for reserve aviation ground officers has been substan tially met for the immediate fu ture 4 A marine corps spokesman the corps will be calling only a few reservists from now on be cause the volunteer recruiting pro gram has been proceeding satis factorily Separate Instructions These plans came out as the 4 services set up new procedures covering the recall and discharge of reservists Each issued separate instructions to carry out Secretary of Defense Marshalls directive of Monday outlining an orderly policy for mobilization of reserve units and individuals Marshall had said that reservists must not be kept on active duty involuntarily any longer than nec essary to meet the increased man power requirements The services response indicated that those objectives are in sight At Fort Lewis Wash the com manding general announcedbe had received an order from the de partment of the army to hold up all overseas shipments of enlisted reservists taking refresher train ing there The order affects almost 12000 reservists including 3000 now on the wayto Fort Lewis from the 5th army area More to Europe Pace indicated that more Ameri can troops may begin to flow to Europe soon but he said the army does not plan tosend any national guard units overseas The Marshall directive called upon the services to bring their reserve lists up to date and give all reservists 30 days to report after they are called It also told the services to set up their man power requirements 6 months in advance and to let reservists know when they are not on the current list This move resulted from com plaints against the varying meth ods used by the different services in summoning reservists to duty Procedures outlined by the services to meet the defense sec retarys directive included Nov 10 enlisted reservists will be notified 4 months in advance of an activeduty call unless a material change in the military situation dictates other wise Additional officers of cap tains grade and below will be no tified in November to report for duty in January and February After Jan 1 all officers recalled will be given 4 months advance notice No Advance Estimate far as practicable the navy said reserves in the callup quota for next March April May and June will receive 4 months notice The navy said however that current military requirements do not permit an immediate firm estimate of its manpower needs 6 months in advance Marine officers and enlisted men earmarked for active duty by next June 30 will be no tified individually by the end of December Air addition to discon tinuing immediately the caDup of enlisted reserves the air force an nounced that it will confine the Involuntary recall of air reserve officers to those possessing criti cal skills not available from vol unteer sources With the possible exception of one air national guard support type unit no ad ditional organized reserve or mr guard units are expected to be mobilized SAME DATE folk m S4 ktttt V AP Wirephoto THE ADVENTURES OF BESSIE Bessie a Guernsey owned by Charles Kvietkus stands placidly at the bottom of a 15foot well left on the Kvietkus property at Water bury Conn after plunging through a plank cover while grazing At the right workmen start to pull on ropes attached to Bessie She was lifted from the well after 14 hours Employes of County Seek Boost negotiating com mittee of local union No 1068 of the American Federation of State County and Municipal employes and John W Tawlks of Sioux City business representative of Iowa State Council No 5 of the federation met Thursday with the Howard county board of su pervisors in Cresco This was the 2nd meeting of the local union with the super visors in which the union pre sented resolutions requesting changes local working condi tions for the county employes The first meeting was held here Oct 4 The resolutions request 8 paid holidays sick leave at the rate of 2i days per month with 90 days accumulation and a graduated wage increase of between 10 and 20 cents per hour depending on the kind of employment At pres ent the county employes receive no paid sick leave They are given 2i paid holidays and one weeks paid vacation a year The union further asks that the employes be paid 10 hours wages for 9 hours labor during the win ter months on a 60 hour week basis The new proposed wage schedule would increase the How ard county employes wages from a maximum of 95 cents to per hour E B Richmond chairman of the board of supervisors said that the union was advised that the board had made a survey of other counties the size of Howard and that they feel that Howard county is paying a wage in keeping with the tax that can be raised in counties of small valuation and population Oliver Employes Return to Work Charles City Production employes of the Oliver corpora tion were back at work1Friday following a stoppage to attend a special meeting called by a union bargaining committee Some 1600 employes left their jobs Thursday shortly before noon All but about 300 foundry work ers were back at their jobs by 1 p m The bargaining committee of lo cal 115 of the Farm Equipment and Metal Workers council of the United Electric Radio and Ma chine Workers of America called the meeting Charles Hobbie of Cedar Rap ids international representative of the union said the meeting was called to discuss grievances hav ing to do with negotiations be tween the company and the un ion in connection with the com panys proposed 6 cents an hour wage increase Hobbie said the meeting also took up a cut in piecework rates and complaints that some work ers failed to follow orders of their foremen Building Industry Protests Ban on NonDefense Plans Washington construc tion industry protested Friday that the governments threat to halt all nondefense building has just about wrecked its 000000ayear business A spokesman noted that in banning amusement construction the national production authority made it clear that it intends to limit or forbid all other nonde fense construction when such action is deemed necessary in the interest of national defense This policy the spokesman added has the effect of placing all construction to be undertaken from this date on in serious jeopardy until the NPA rules on each specific case In anotner action Thursday the authority told manufacturers of home appliances radios and tele vision sets that 20 to 30 per cent of their normal supply of alum inum nickel and copper may have to be diverted to military production Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Increasing cloudiness Friday night Saturday mostly cloudy with chance for showers High Saturday 6670 Low Fri day night 4852 Iowa Increasing cloudiness and little temperature change Fri day night Saturday cloudy with occasional showers Clearing and somewhat cooler Saturday night Low Friday night 4852 north 5258 south High Sat urday 6872 South to southwest winds 2530 Saturday morning and northwest 1822 Saturday afternoon and evening Further outlook Partly cloudy Sunday mostly cloudy Monday Little change in temperature turning cooler Tuesday Iowa 5Day Weather Outlook0 Temperatures will average 6 to 10 degrees above normal north and 10 to 12 above normal south part of state Normal maximum 5056 normal minimum 3035 Turning cooler late Saturday and Sunday Warmer Monday turning cooler again Tuesday Precipitation will average one quarter inch or less occurring as showers Monday or Tuesday Minnesota Increasing cloudiness Friday night and somewhat warmer Saturday showers end ing in early afternoon and turn ing cooler Saturday evening Low Friday night 4852 High Saturday 58 north 65 south IN MASON CITY Globe Gazette weather statis tics for the 24 hours ending at 8 a m Oct 27 Maximum 59 Minimum 38 At 8 a m 44 Year Ago Maximum Minimum 54 35 Kidnapping Investigation Is Dropped Wlnterset UR An investiga tion of a kidnaping report by a Winterset automobile dealer has been dropped County Attorney Robert 0 Frederick said the investigation was dropped after it was learned the dealer Russell Cain 28 had bought gasoline for several youths at Indianola during the time he was supposed to have been a prisoner of the kidnapers Frederick also said the dealer and his mother had requested that no charges be filed in the case Cain had told a story of Ijeing approached by 4 men Monday night threatened with a gun and forced into the rear seat of his own car He said he then was driven around for several hours but escaped after the others all got out of the car He said he wrecked his car while fleeing from the men Frederick said it also had been established that no demands for money were made against Cain that night Heavy Storms on West Coast By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS A destructive storm boiled into the northwest from the Pacific Friday leaving one dead scores injured and heavy damage in coastal areas It was one of coastal Califor nias worst storms and another but perhaps lesser blow is due Friday night The freak weather meanwhile left the plains states broiling in summerlike heat The mercury soared to 90 degrees Thursday in Wichita Kans and Tulsa Okla record highs for the date Winds up to 75 miles an hour raked the coast from Santa Bar bara in southern California into Oregon Trees crashed windows smashed and communications lines snapped A deluge of rain ac companied the blow flooding basements The storm hit harbor shipping The coast guard was kept busy by distress calls from boats and ships in trouble Some small boats were grounded or sunk One drowning was blamed on the storm Treees toppled on auto mobiles and homes injuring scores Eight workers were hurt on the San Francisco peninsula when the wind dumped a railway roundhouse roof on them Strong winds pounded Nevada and Idaho as the storm center moved up the coast in a north easterly direction Swedens King Gustav in Serious Condition Stockholm The condition of ailing King Gustav V 92 took a serious turn Friday as a result of increased coughing and a marked difficulty in breathing The king is suffering from pro nounced weariness Report Red Defenders China Strengthened by Marines Defend Training Plan for Combat Washington Gen J C McQueen said Friday that a committee of marine corps officers has found no instance in which a marine reservist was sent into combat in Korea without adequate training McQueen director of public in formation and recruiting for the corps is a member of the com mittee which studied the question for Gen Clifton B Gates marine corps commandant There have been complaints that some reservists were sent into combat without enough training McQueen told a reporter marine reservists were screened as to prior service and training before being ordered from the U S After the screening he added reservists were asked whether they them selves felt they had received ade quate training for combat Find No Cast We have found no case Mc Queen continued where a re servist who felt he had not re ceived adequate training was sent into combat He said an analysis of casualty figures from the 1st marine divi sion indicates that marine regulars suffered more casualties in pro portion to their numbers than the reserves One reason for this in his opinion is the fact that more regulars than reservists are put in assault waves The committee looked into com plaints from Rock Island 111 Nashville Tenn and Shelby Mont Mrs Harold J Lund of Rock Island HL said that her husband received inadequate training be fore he was sent into combat in Korea and killed Once GunnersMate McQueen asked about that case said Sergeant Lund served as a gunners mate in the navy for two years during World war II He said Lund joined a marine reserve engineer company at Rock Island last Feb 1 and attended weekly drills until called to active duty late in the summer McQueen said the sergeant received intensive training at Camp Pendleton Ore and as much training as possible aboard ship enroute to Korea Marine Widow Calls Report Unsatisfactory Rock Island 111 report by Brig Gen J C McQueen that a committee of marine corps of ficers has found no instance in which a marine reservist was sent into combat in Korea with out adequate training was termed very unsatisfactory Friday by Mrs Shirley Lund East Moline widow of a Rock Island reserv ist killed 9 weeks after he left the quadcities The marine corps seems to be sidestepping all my questions she said I hope that Gen Clifton B Cates the marine corps command ant who has promised to look into the subject personally will tell the officers to make a more complete report Mrs Lund has pointed out that more than 5 years elapsed between World war II and the Korean war that her husbands drills as a member of the reserves consisted of movies and features which oc cupied only part of his time as he was put in charge of everything in supply that his unit was called into service Aug 8 and sent to Camp Pendleton where the ex tensive training consisted of lay ing around the barracks until he was shipped overseas landing in Korea Sept 21 as a member of a machine gurj detachment She said his letters to her written aboard ship indicated he was very discouraged over his lack of train ing Reservists Have Grim Little Gripe Among Some Marines Want Limit on Wars Man Has to Fight By BEM PRICE With U S 1st Marines oft Ko rea reservists now catching up with this war have a grim little gripe among them selves It goes like this Somebody ought to set up a system for the number of wars a guy has got to 3 wars to a man and then he can go home and pick up the pieces of his life That leaves one war per man for most regulars and reserves alike And with grunts of resig nation you hear them talking of going to Indochina After President Truman promised material to the French in Indochina and in view of the French defeats the marines are convinced that they will be In the juntle again shortly This is the 1st time in this war that I have been with the ma rines As an exmarine myself I can only sit and compare notes with the marines I knew in World war II These are not the Gung Ho or hellforlcather marines of 5 years ago Perhaps they are the deadlier fighters for it There is a grim realization that they have a job to do And that they will dp it with all the effi ciency possible with least loss of life to themselves War is not a subject of jest anymore They are perfectly aware that a man can expect to survive just so many battles The heroics of the last war are missing Perhaps the most moving of all changes is to be found in the wardroom of this ship the USS Pickaway enroute to a bloodless landing near Wonsan Under similar circumstances in the last war the conversation in evitably was of girls girls girls With a little urging the marines would haul out their pictures Now the pictures are of wives and children But no longer arc they flashed freely The longing for home was deep in he last war But it was overshadowed by the great ad venture Now it is steeped for these men in bitterness They now know that adventure is dirt and disease and death As professional or semiprofes sional fighting men they realize that there is a job to do and they are doing it But underneath there is a belief that they cannot should not be expected to do it all the time There is considerable unhappi ness among the reservists over the way many were shoved into com bat without an opportunity to brush up on latest technics and to get in physical condition Aboard this ship with one battle already behind them are men who during the 1st week of August were peaceful citizens thinking mostly of putting their kids in school There are men aboard this ship who arrived in camp one day and were ordered overseas the next men who wore soft from battling desk jobs for 5 years In some measure if you probe deep enough these men seem to feel they have been forged into cannon fodder Thinly Clad Allies Fight Snow Peaks Few Enemy Troops Found Near Border Guerilla Bands Met From Wire Services AP Wirephoto REDS READY NEW DEFENSE Broken line shows where South Korean intelligence officers said North Koreans are setting up a hew defense line for a last ditch stand South Koreans were meeting stiff resistance in the OnjongUnsan Some reports said the at tackers were contingents of Chinese reds who crossed into Korea from communist Manchuria Troops landed at Won san were being hurried to Hamhung and Hungnam brok en arrow to bolster South Korean troops advancing to ward Manchuria Black arrows indicate allied positions Find 29 More Vonfa Bayonet fed by Reds By JOSEPH QUINN Unsan North Korea The bodies of 29 American war prisoners shot bayorietted and burned by the Nofth Ko rean reds have been found beside the wreck of a longsought prison train a U S medical officer said Friday About 180 American prisoners were on the train when it ran off the rails last tured about thesame time while serving with company I of the 24th divisions 21st regiment Both Whitcomb and Slater were taken south to higher military headquarters for medical care restand interrogation near t h e small Chongchon river town of Kujang 64 miles north of Pyongyang Communist guards took 30 prisoners who were too badly wounded or ill to walk lined them up along the tracks and methodic ally shot and bayonetted them Only one man L Jones of Lubbock Tex Two Others Escape to Tell Then the reds set fire to the wrecked train and marched off the remaining 150 prisoners toward the Manchurian border However two escaped and told the grim story of the massacre to Lt Worsham B Roberson of San Antonio Tex The two escaped men Walter R Whitcomb of Buffalo N Y and Elmer N Slater of an unidentified town in Illinois said that another prison train which ran just ahead of the derailed section was carry ing other American prisoners toward Manchuria Among the prisoners on this 1st section they said was at least one highranking American officer The two sections were believed part of the same train from which communist guards removed near ly 100 other feeble American prisoners at Sunan 12 miles north of Pyongyang a week ago Friday and machinegunned them Nearly 80 were killed but 21 survived that massacre The two survivors of the latest atrocity were found by the U S 6th tank battalion which was dashing north toward the Man churian border in search of the missing train Survivor Found Nearby Roberson said cars of the wreck ed train still were burning when the tank forces reached Kujang The bodies of the 29 slaughtered prisoners were found heaped near by some of them charred from the fire Sixty yards from the wreckage Roberson said he found Jones the sole survivor He said Jones told him he was captured July 27 while with com pany B of the 29th infantry regi ment on the southwest sector of the Pusan beachhead Whitcomb was captured the same day while fighting with company K of the same regiment Slater was cap ing the month of September Study Northern Gas Rate Increase Plea Washington power com mission hearing on a request by Northern Natural Gas company for a rate increase was recessed Fri day until Feb 19 The hearing opened Monday Involved is Northerns request foi a 14 per cent increase in its whole sale rates to 28 companies which serve 230 communities in Nebras ka Kansas Iowa Minnesota and South Dakota It was estimated by the company that this would bring in in additional revenue for the year ending in October 1951 The firm formally filed Friday with the commission a request for an additional 1546 per cent in to bring in an additional in the same period Alvin Kurtz commission coun sel asked for the recess so could study the companys re quest for the 2nd increase He said the two increases asked rep resent the largest increase ever filed with the commissionr1 Examiner Sam Jensch said it will be up to the commission it self to decide whether the requests for the two rate increases will be considered together after the hear ing resumes He also said it will be up to the commission to decide whether the hearing should be resumed in Omaha Northerns headquarters as requested by counsel for var ious cities and companies EMBEZZLEMENT CHARGED Cedar Rapids Mrs Harriet Bascom 33 has been bound over to the grand jury on a charge oi embezzlement She is accused of taking from the Davis Clean ers where she was employed dur LAST CHANCE In order to vote in Mason City at the general election Nov 7 anyone who has Changed name by marriage or otherwise Changed address even within the same precinct Failed to vote in the last 4 years Become a citizen either by naturalization or becoming 21 years old must register at the city clerks office in the city hall be fore noon Saturday allied trobpa trudged over snow and tortu ous summits Friday night to ward Manchurias communist frontier The forward troop move ment was from the Korean west coast across the spiny peninsula to the Seaof Ja pan The shivering troops braved wintry blasts but met few eri emy troops near the borderv Behind the forward most troops however red forces put up a fight A U S 8th army spokes man here said the South rean 1st division had beaten back an attack by a red force containing and NorthKorean elements 50 miles south of the border The battle raged all day around Unsan directly south of Chosan the only Manchur ian border point reached by United Nations Enemy Driven At nightfall a U S 8th army headquarters spokesman said the South Korean 1st divisionhad beaten bade the attadtjztr driven them West of the town At Chosan where the ttOK 6th division was perched on the banks of the Yalu river opposite Man churia not an enemy soldier was visible The river forms the boundary But bands of bypassed North Koreans popped up in scat tered areas Resistance Strong Fifty thousand allied troops which landed at Wonsah are rush ing to the aid of South Koreans who are meeting strong resistance in the northeast sector A battalion of North Koreans was putting up a stiff fight against ROK Republic of Korea units seeking to capture the Changjin and Pujon reservoirs which sup ply 8 hydroelectric plants A spokesman at Gen MacAr thurs headquarters s aid non Korean troops would be used any where to wipe out the North Ko reans Earlier there had been re ports that American British Fil ipino and Turkish troops would leave the Marichuriarr border area to the South Koreans on the theory that uneasy munists on the border would less likely to be aroused Forty thousand Chinese com munist troops have entered Korea Maj Gen Yu Hae Heung com mander of the 2nd South Korean corps said Friday Russian Advisers American officers of the Korean military advisory group assigned to the 2nd corps said communist prisoners also had reported that the Chinese have Russian with them Heung said the Chinese troops assigned to the Chinese 40th corps were thrown into the fight at Un san 64 miles north of Pyongyang and 55 miles from the Manchurian border I believe they are here for several reasons he said The most important tactical reason is the protection pf the large num ber of electrical plants in north west Korea along the Yalu river The Yalu river formsthe fron tier between Manchuria and Ko rea The electrical plants include one at Suilio bridge which is larger than Boulder dam and pro vides power for Manchuria and Siberia as well as Korea Heung said the South Korean forces intend to take the electrical plants His 2nd corps includes both the South Korean 1st and 6th di vision Names Chinese Units The general said the Chinese units included the 118th 119th and 120th regiments They were armed with 120millimeter mor tars 120millimeter howitzers machineguns and small arms he said Three battalions of Chinese troops arc fighting as a part of a North Korean division which has surrounded the 2nd regiment of the South Korean 6th division Heung said However a South Korean spokesman said the regiment al ready was breaking out of en circlement He predicted the sec tor would be cleared by 4lurday   

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