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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: October 20, 1950 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 20, 1950, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER FOR HOME MASON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE THI NIWtPAPIR THAT MAKIS ALL MORTH IOWANS HOME EDITION GREATER MASON CITY DAYS October 19 20 21 VOL LVU Prat writ PraM LMH Ciate MASON CITY IOWA FRIDAY OCTOBER 2t Thto Paper Cooiisu of Two OM Mason City Assured Direct Airline Service to Chicago Direct airline connection with Chicago with two flights daily in each direction was assured Mason City Friday by a ruling of the civil aeronautics board The board granted MidContinent airlines temporary au to stop at Mason City on its ChicagoSioux City line until MAYOR BRUCE ELECTED Mayor Howard E Bruce of Ma City was elected president the League of Iowa Munici palities at the ctotinc of the organization convention In DCS Moines Thursday Hoover Asks Aid Stop Until Europe Arms By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Americas only living expresi dent an allied military leader in World war IIand an elder states man offered to the nation Thurs day night their advice on keeping this country strong in a tension packed world The advice came from Herbert Hoover Gen Dwight D Eisen hower and Bernard M Baruch presidential adviser in two World wars Mr Hoover called for military iclfhelp from western Europe and reorganization of the United Nations to take the worlds mili taryeconomic burden off the of the UnitedStates In a foreign policy address broadcast fronr New York Mr Hoover said We cannot carry the load for long without filfilling Stalins hopes of bleeding us economical ly to impotence He asked the democratic na tions of the world to specify what they will join with and when in a united military and economic front against communism Calls Loans Gifts Since the end of World war II he said this country has spent al most 520000000000 in western Europe with gifts and loans which are also bound to be gifts We should say and at once that we shall provide no more money until a definitely unified and sufficient European army is in sight And further that 10 American divisions will not be landed until then he said If the United Nations including western Europe fail to take up the major burden of their own de fenses he said We had better quit talking and paying and consider holding the Atlantic ocean with Britain if they one frontier and the Pacific ocean with an armed Japan and other islands as the other frontier Dislikes Preventive War In Pittsburgh Gen Eisenhower said America must be strong enough to meet her worldwide obligations but stay out of a pre ventive war because war begets conditions that beget further wars Eisenhower president of Colum bia university spoke at a founders day program at the Carnegie In stitute of Technology Concerning universal military training he said It will demand sacrifice but can any sacrifice be considered too great if it guar antees a lifetime of freedom Although more than a token contribution of men and arms must come from the U S he said each of the Atlantic Pact nations must capitalize on its particular capacity for exertion or endur ance Our own job is produc tion and the ability to move strong and destructive power quickly over great distances Eisenhower said the times may demand a sudden and tremen dous increase in the budget for defense but he warned against reckless extravagance and selfish grabbing which will mortgage the future of America DATE flif in t4 airport facilities at Fort Dodge are adequate to permit a stop there MidContinent already has joined with Mason Citys airport commission however in a request that the CAB add Mason City as a permanent stop on the Chicago Sioux City route so that the air line later will be able to serve both cities Hemrinr Oct 31 A hearing is scheduled Oct 31 on the airport commissions re quest Meanwhile according to Presi dent J W Miller of MidConti nent service is expected to start in Mason City in 3 or 4 weeks He said preparation and filing of tar iffs and schedules would require some time The ruling Friday represented the culmination of more than a quarter of a century of intensive efforts by Mason City businessmen to get airline service to Chicago This effort has been pushed by the Mason City airport commission ever since its creation Chairman Emil Koerber City Attorney Ray E Clough and H C Timberlake Minneapolis airport consultant represented the com mission in a series of meetings with government officials in Washington Oct 5 which led di rectly to the ruling Friday Plead Citys Case At that time Koerber said Sen ator Guy Gillette of Iowa made it possible for the 3 to see both Act ing CAB Chairman Oswald Ryan and Board Member Josh Lee in order to plead Mason Citys case At that time they were assured that the application would be granted since it was noncontro versial and had the approval of the CAB examiner The 3 Mason City representa tives also are expecting to attend the hearing on the permanent stop Oct 31 and evidence now is being prepared to be presented Koerber said A group of representatives of 12 cities in Iowa and Minnesota near Mason City earlier this month joined in asking the CAB to grant the temporary authority to landat MasonCityinstead of Fort Dodge Chairman Koerber Friday ex pressed his gratitude to them for their cooperation and also to Sen ator Gillette who did a wonderful job for Mason City AP Wirephoto VEEP GETS DOWN TO ESSENTIALS ON a full day of traveling and making speeches Vice President Alben Barkley comfortable in gray pajamas and with bare feet on the floor of his chartered plane studies speeches for the coming day Place where the picture was taken was not revealed Hickenlooper Sees Violation byPMAOfficial HarUn ff U S Senator Bourke B Hickenlooper republi can candidate for reelection charged in a speech here Friday that paid employes of the U S de partment of agriculture are violat ing the spirit and letter of the Satch act by campaigning for his democratic opponent Al Loveland Hickenlooper said that on Oct 18 Paul Benner of Marshaltlown district fieldrnan for the produc tion and marketing administration ivas quoted in a news story in the Rapids Gazette as saying hat farmers must elect Loveland to hold the farm program they have gained in the last 17 years Cites Statement Hickenlooper said Benner made the statement in a speech to Linn ounty PMA committeemen In Des Moines State PMA Chairman H E Hazen said he was ure that Benners remarks had 3een misconstrued and added that he PMA as an organization or in its organization meetings has stayed away from anything po itical Benner could not immediately be reached for comment State committeemen and field men are employes of the federal overnment Hazen said but coun y and township committeemen are not Hickenlooper told his Harlan audience I have fought and will continue o fight to keep partisan politics out of the farm program the enator told his audience We dont want to see the farm pro ram dragged through the mire of partisan politics But the bureau rats have injected politics into he farm picture by their admitted political activity in the state We the paid PMA workers knee deep in politics violating the rlatch act by trying to dictate to the electorate who shall represent Iowa in congress Hand Picked Hickenlooper said that Loveland was the hand picked candidate of Secretary of Agriculture Charles f Brannan and he asked Who shall write the farm pro gram the farmers themselves or he bureaucratic planners in Wash ington The senator said it the re publicans in the 80th congress who passed the first and only long range farm program for ag riculture Hickenlooper also discussed the farm program at Marshalltown Thursday night when he spoke at a G 0 P rally thcrt U S Ready for 5Power Talks on World Peace Lake Success United States announced Friday it was prepared to take part in a 5 power meeting on problems threatening world peace This announcement was made in thev political committee by John Foster republican policy adviser to the state department He warned however against underestimating the complexities of the problems involved and said the United Statse would insist on agreements based on justice Dulles backed the objectives of a SyrianIraqui resolution calling for big power consultations The 5 major nations would report back to the current session of the general assembly any progress achieved Britain and France supported the basic aims of the resolution Russia has not participated thus far in the debate A flood of suggested changes some of them largely of a draft ing nature were brought in by various delegations backing the goal sought in the resolution The committee adjourned until Satur day morning to allow Iraq and Syria time to confer with other delegations Qn the incorporation of amendments Clear Lake Sewer District Is Approved Clear Lake The Clear Lake sanitary sewer district was ap proved Thursday by voters of the Clear Lake town of Ven ami theresidents within the watershed of the lake itself in cluding the favoTi of establishment of the pro posed district Clear Lake voters were 740 for and 223 against the proposal All other voters balloted 186 for and 42 against it The approval makes it possible to elect trustees who will then study the financial needs and pro pose the amount of the bond issue necessary to finance building of the sanitary sewer district The voters then will ballot again to decide whether the bonds shall be issued Pollution of the lake and the necessity for a new disposal plant for the city of Clear Lake were factors in the proposal to estab lish the district SHuOTXOCAL DUCKS New York hunters of 8 states including Iowa will have to rely largely upon locally raised ducks for their targets Ducks Unlimited Inc says The waterfowl season opened at noon Friday Ducks Unlimited reports that the main migration from Canada is not yet under way AmericanChutists Make Landing Behind Red Line Seal Off Enemy in Pyongyang Tokyo AP Thousands of American parachute troops leaped deep into red Korea to clean up the war Friday They had two missions To finish the UN war and rescue mistreated captive A m e r i cans General MacArthur himself directed the spectacular aeri al assault the 1st parachute offensive of the Korean war from his plane overhead The paratroop operation 22 miles north of the captured communist capital of Pyong yang cut the escape of die hard red troops still around the north rim of the city Complete Surprise After flying over the scene MacArthur said I didnt see any opposition It looks like it was a com plete surprise It looks like we closed the trap Closing the trap should be the end of all organized resistance The war is very defi nitely coming to an end MacArthur did not amplify his appraisal that the war was at an end The parachute landings were in twobattalion strength The number of chutists was not reported But with 120 planes dropping 35 men each the tota The paratroopers fanned ou toward the towns of Sukchon am Sunchon The maneuver was a complete surprise and the Amer icans appeared to be meeting little resistance Artillery including such equipment as heavy 105mm howitzers was dropped to the men who went into action immediate ly Closing Chapter As pictured by MacArthur the closing chapter in the historic United Nations campaign has be gun The war started last June 25 when North Korean commu nists invaded the westernrecog nized South Korean republic The aerial climax came less than 24 hours after United Nations troops seized Pyongyang After the paratroopers took off for their mission to the north of Puongyang Gen MacArthur land ed at an airstrip in the center of the city He gave orders to U S 3th army commander Lt Gen Walton H Walker to send South Koreans racing towards the Man churian border to complete the al lied victory The South Koreans DOVN ON THE Cavalry troopers Cpl Jimmy L Scellato milking cow held by Pfc W J Brown Oklahoma City decided a break in field rations would be welcome after capture of Kumchon North Korea An unidentified GI in back ground walks off with a brace of ducks AP Wlrephoto Allison of Ottuntwa as he appeired Thursday in the Monroe county jail after belnt arretted and charred with the murder of his wife He admitted guilt In po lice court pushing out from the city of Ham hung have already reached within 92 miles of communist Chinas border Only a few stray shots echoe in the bombpocked streets o Pyongyang as South Korean troops moved into the city propei to clean up the last of the diehard communists Associated Bress Cor respondent Tom Lambert report ed the finish of the occupation o Pyongyang was accomplished against only light opposition Some 6202 communists sur rendered during the fight foruth capital bringing the UN total o North to fcpOOO Red Premier Fleet CommunistPremierKim IISung and members of his gpverrimen had fled They were said to have taken refuge in far North Korea or across the border in either Manchuria or soviet Siberia Correspondents said the main part of the city was not badly damaged Civilians cheered the American and South Korean troops Many waved South Korean flags and some had United Nations banners Some buildings already bore streamers reading Welcome to United Nations Forces Ed Kelly Former Chicago Mayor Dead at 74 Chicago Mayor Ed ward J Kelly 74 democratic na tional committeeman from Illinois died Friday He was stricken in his suite a the Ambassador East hotel and died on the way to a doctors of fice His death was a shock to his friends He had been active anc during recent weeks had appeared at several democratic rallies He was Chicagos mayor from 1933 to 1947 longer than any other mayor and one of the lead ng political forces contributing to he elections of the late Franklin D Roosevelt as president Kelly called himself boss of Chicago politics and never made any bones about having a power ful machine Weather Report FORECAST City Fair and mild Friday night and Saturday Low Friday night in mid40s High Satur day 70 Iowa 5Day Weather Temperatures will average 3 to 6 degrees above normal Little or no precipitation Normal high 59 Normal low 37 Temperatures fluctuating daily from above to near normal Iowa Generally fair Friday night and Saturday Not so cool Fri day night Low Friday night 46 to 52 west 42 to 48 east High Saturday 60 to 66 northwest 66 to 74 southeast Shifting winds becoming west northwest 2025 MPH Saturday Further out look Generally fair with little change in temperature Sunday and Monday IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics or the 24 hours ending at 8 a m Maximum 67 Minimum 33 At 8 a m 43 YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum 65 55 Murder 280 Americans in Deafh March From Seoul to Red Capital By TOM LAMBERT Pyongyang American survivors said Fri day 280 U S prisoners of war were beaten and murdered on a red death march from Seoul to Pyongyang the captured red capital The 3 survivors made no immediate mention they the fate of Maj Gen William F Dean U S 24th division commander who dis appeared late mJulyJin fall of taejori the big South Ko rean town below Seoul V Swinging down the main street of completely occupied Pyongyang arm and arm with 3 Korean stu dents the bearded and long haired trio told of the Americans being beaten and murdered on the tor ture march by their red captors They are Air Force Capt William Locke 30 Enfield Ga an F51 pilot whose wife and 9monthsold Jumping Operation Is Perfect By HAL BOYLE In a 5th Air Force Plane North of Pyonryanr battalions of American parachute troops dropped deep behind enemy lines Friday afternoon as Gen Douglas MacArthur circled overhead in his constellation Scap One battalion jumped nearSuk chon 23 miles northwest of the fallen North Korean capital The jumps began promptly al 2 p m after being twice post poned by bad weather during the day The objectives were to seite the two towns and set up roadblocks to cut off any enemy troops atill fleeingthe Pyongyang area and to free any American prisoners o r tbevicinityfi General Watcher The operation went off without a hitch MacArthur watched for almost an hour as the varicolored parachutes floated down with sup plies and men of the 187th regi mental combat team of the llth airborne division Afterward Mac Arthur landed at Pyongyang east had been secured less than 4 hours person ally congratulated Maj Gen Wil liam A Tunner commander of the far east air forces combat cargo command After warmly greeting Lt Gen Walton H Walker and Maj Gen Earle E Partridge who met him at the field MacArthur shook hands with Tunner and said A magnificent performance you put on today The supreme commander wore a leather jacket and the famous battered garrison cap which his troops call Old Stinky He ap peared stirred by the experience of seeing his airborne troops launch their 1st combat landing in Korea He was accompanied by Lt Gen George E Stratemeyer and other high ranking officers In the galaxy of field brass waiting for him at the airport was Maj Gen Hobart R Gay commander of the 1st cavalry division which was 1st to enter the North Ko rean capitaL Pyongyang Cleared MacArthur strolled smiling up and down the runway during a private conference with Walker the 8th army commander He left for Tokyo after a 35minute stay at the which he was informed his troops had cleared Pyongyang of the enemy during the morning Even before the last paratrooper iad been dropped in the daring op eration behind enemy lines Tun ner who commanded the Berlin airlift and the ChinaBurma hump operations already had started a new airlift It is to Pyongyang field to ferry up supplies of food gas oline and ammunition for ground ask forces set to break through he trapped enemy north of here ind link up with the paratroopers Before noon 10 C54s had un oaded 90 tons of supplies on the field as ROK South Korean nfantry mopped up snipers in the learby hills Anxious to Jump The airborne troops for days had been complaining against their in action and an officer said If these boys dont get a chance o jump soon theyre going to tear omething apart MacArthur gave them their daughter Karon were at Yakoda air base hi Japan when he crashed in North Korean territory near Waegwan Aug 17 Army Lt Alexander Makafou mis 27 Lowell Mass of company I 29th regiment captured near Hadong July 27 Army Sgt Takeshi Kumdai ot Honolulu headquarters company 34th regiment division cap tured July 20 when the reds took Taejon Found by Ncwtmen They were found by a ot correspondents as they walked down the street arm in arm with 3 Nor urday The 3 were only sur V hance in the kind of battle tac ic he likes bold and sur rise attack He came himself to ce what may be the last large cale operation of the war They vere flown to their jump sites in 20 C119s and 40 C 7s With them their heavy equip ment parachuted MM uns 105 MM Howitzers 42 mortars trucks weapon carriers nd jeeps vivors of a group of 283 American prisoners of war marched here from Seoul in late September and early October The 3 Americans had hidden under a school and had been fed by the 3 students They came out Friday as the city fell to American and South Korean troops The trio said the red Koreans told them they were being moved from Seoul to Pyongyang for safety Captain Locke said he pleaded with North not to move the men and to give medical attention to the wounded The airman said the North Ko reans replied We already got enough atroc ities listed against us so a few more wont makeany difference Die Like Flies Captain Locke said that during the death march Americans died like flies from starvation cold pneumonia and dysentery Seventeen in the group were wounded when an American plane strafed their column obviously mistakingthem for reds The 3 survived because thev had hidden under the school They said others of the group were marched north as the United Na tions forces approached Pyong yang Their fate was not known On the trudge from Seoul to Pyongyang the trio said the reds shot those Americans who could not walk Said one Some of the men were carry ing their buddies on their backs uys who fell down were beaten and bayonetted by the red guards Captain Locke said the guards dlled those Americans who could not continue marching Kumdai said the North Korean guards told him earlier the Amer cans were to be taken to jojin which is located along the Yalu river on the KoreanMan churian border In Fair Condition The 3 survivors seemed to be in air physicial condition They said they were in better shape than any of the Americans who were marched out of here Saturday First thing the 3 asked for was anything sweet They ate heartily of army ration jelly and cookies They gulped army ration spa ghetti and hamburger Since their capture they had lived on scant rations of rice and water plus food given them by civilians who visited the school All 3 accused the North Koreans of starving American prisoners and failing to give them necessary medical treatment Captain Locke said 373 Ameri cans were moved out of Seoul on Sept 20 as the Americans ad vanced on the city He said many of the prisoners were suffering from hunger Something Up The American prisoners could hear artillery fire and knew   

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