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Mason City Globe Gazette: Wednesday, September 6, 1950 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - September 6, 1950, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWA DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME MASON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE T H I NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS HOME EDITION VOL LVI Press and United Press full Lease Wires Five Cents a Copy MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 6 1S50 Paper Consist ol Two No 284 UN Troops Form New Line Near Taegu Russia Claims Plane Unarmed Slap Truman at Marines Stirs Row Republicans Rush to Corps Defense President Attacked Washington UR President Truman probably will send a letter Wednesday to the Marine Corps League convention here explaining his letter asserting that the marines have a propa ganda machine almost equal to Stalins The white house had no comment otherwise on the situation By ELTON C FAY Washington IP President Trumans badlyphrased statement that the marines have a propa ganda machine almost equal to Stalins Wednesday stirred up 1 both wrathful reaction and curi osity about how it came to be made The president chose an odd time to write to a republican congress man chiding a service around which has grown something akin to legend It came in an election year on the eve of a convention of the marine corps league in the midst of a war in which the marines are fighting Also the letter followed closely on a series of incidents which had showed up sharp di vision between white house think ing and that by some high military officials The presidents comment about marine propaganda was con tained in his answer to a request by Rep McDonough RCal for equal representation of the marine corps in the joint chiefs of staff In turning down that idea the president said the marine corps is the navys police force and as long as I am president that is what it will remain He added how ever nobody desires to belittle the efforts of the marine corps i Silence Not Shared The marine corps retained an official and discreet silence not shared in other capital quarters Senator Aiken RVt labeled the letter indiscreet incorrect and uncalled for Senator Thye R Minn called it shocking and incredible to Senator Hicken looper RIowa it was astound ingly insulting Senator Kefauver DTenn said it was a very un thoughtful letter A measure of defense of the president came from Senator Douglas a marine corps officer in World war II Douglas said he disagreed with virtually everything in the letter but he said he is sure it did not represent Mr Trumans real judgment Once in a while boners are made Douglas observed Douglas said the letter might have been written by someone else and signed inadvertently If Mr Truman did write it he said it was in a moment of tempo rary irritation White house officials caught by surprise when the letter be came public through the Con gressional record discounted the theory that someone else may have written it Written Himself These sources who asked not to be named said the president had undoubtedly written the let ter himself They noted that the language was typically his If uniformed members of the marine corps felt constrained marine veterans and friends of the marine corps did not Clay Nixon commandant of the league said a presidential retvae tion was in order that the presi dent had vilified and insulted the marines and damaged the spirit of marines fighting in Korea He called the letter an insult to the marine corps which stepped into the breach at this critical time when that service alone was ready for emergency combat de spite its inadequate numbers and appropriations The marine corps reserve of ficers association issued a 3page report The fundamental tragedy cf this illtimed statement is that it is quite obvious that there is no one available in high places to advise the president as to the mis sion and functions of the marine corps the association said It is quite evident that the presidents thinking is only a re flection of current Pentagon re actions to the marine corps The leagues resolutions com mittee rushed through a formal SENATOR ACCUSES CABINET OFFICER drew F Schoeppel left Tuesday night in Washington accused Secretary of the Interior Oscar L Chapman right of an alliance with the Russian cause He told the senate that Chapman had associated with communist front groups and suggested that Chapman may have resigned from such organizations and gone under ground to preserve his official position Drepare Probe of Chapmans Connections Washington senate interior committee will begin public hearings Thursday on charges by Senator Schoeppel RKans that Secretary of In terior Chapman once belonged to communist front groups By G MILTON KELLY Washington charge that Secretary of Interior Oscar L hapman was once closely allied vith the Russian soviet caase appeared headed Wednesday for an early senate investigation Senator Schoeppel RKas made the accusation in a senate peech Tuesday night He said the abinet officer had associated with Communist front groups and may lave left them only to preserve lis official position Senator OMahoney DWyo announced he offer an im mediate inquiry by the senate in erior committee he heads Chap nan he added is anxious to estify and Schoeppel will be in vited to attend Democratic senators had termed Schoeppels accusations politics Schoeppel told the senate Chap mans record is replete with references which show conclu ively the strong and close per sonal alliance between the Russian soviet cause and the present sec demand that Mr Truman retract his untrue statement and planned to lay it before the convention Wednesday afternoon The chairman of tne committee Harvey Helman of Indicott N Y predicted overwhelming approval of by what he described as peeved and disgruntled mem bers Nixon had said some members were so angry that they wanted to throw Mr Truman out of their organization But Helman said the resolutions committee considered no expulsion proposal No Comment There was no comment from the white house Presidential Secretary Charles G Ross told newsmen who asked about the letter There is nothing I can say about it I havent had an op portunity to talk to the president It was evident that the incident had stirred up feeling among ma rine veterans and their friends The white house switchboard acknowledged a big volume of in coming calls One aroused citizen William C Baxter of Newton Conn called the Washington bureau of the As sociated Press He said he hadnt MARINES AT TRUMAN LETTER With U S Marines in Korea Fighting marines were angry and profane Wednesday on learning of President Tru mans remark that the marine corps has a propaganda ma chine that is almost equal to Stalins None would be quoted by name on what their commanderin chief had to say Their imme diate reaction generally was stunned surprise They apparently got their first word ot the presidents statement through war corres pondents and the armys service newspaper Stars and Stripes Most marine officers were re luctant to comment on Presi dent Trumans letter to Rep Gordon McDonough RCal which was made public in the United States The officers said they believed anything they might have to say might affect their relations with other U S fighting forces in Ko rea The nearest thing to a reply came from a field officer who was asked for his views I think he replied it 5s very unfair to ask me to com ment on such an unfair state ment been able to get through to any one at the white house anc wanted to tell someone how he felt Im really plain burnt Baxte said Nobody will listen to me I think its time for little Joe Cit izen like me to speak up I jus plain resent the whole damnec thing In private conversaticn marine and their friends were of severa schools of thought about the let ter One was inclined to the be lief that it might have been writ ten in a moment of pique An some thought Mr Truman mean exactly what he said if somewha untactfully retary of interior OMahoney said Schoeppels charges were similar to ones checked in 1948 by a house labor subcommittee which he said gave Chapman a clean bill Schoeppel coupled his attack on Chapman with a broadside against persons pressing for statehood for Alaska He said he favors state nood for both Alaska and Hawaii but not as adjuncts of the de partment of interior I do not want to wake up and find a socalled American Quisling doing a job that Height be serving the purposes Rnceta of soviet Russia He accused Alaskan Governor Ernest Gruening and Delegate E L Bartlett who represents the territory in congress of having been instrumental in hiring to lobby for Alaska statehood a former public relations counsel for communist Poland He identified the lobbyist as John Hampton Randolph Feltus who he said was a registered agent of the kremlin via Warsaw for 3 years before taking the Alaskan job Bartlett offered to appear before OMahoneys committee to reply William Dougherty interior de partment spokesman character ized Schoeppels remarks as an attack on Alaska statehood He said Chapman was studying the speech and would have a full statement Wednesday STEAL SHOW MODEL Cherokee fP A model sports sedan new 1950 was taken from the show window of the En gsl Motor Sales company The car had been on display in full view of the sales window The thieves drove another car into its place to make the theft less ap parent Moscow Says We Shot Craft Without Cause Lake Success Russias Jakob A Malik Wednesday handed the United Nations a note saying the soviet plane shot down off Korea Sept 4 was an aircraft on a training flight London Russia de clared Wednesday a plane shot down by United Nations forces Monday was a soviet craft on a iraining flight and that it was at acked without cause The Moscow radio broadcast ng a note to Ihe United States declared 3 Russian pilots died in he destroyed plane Moscow said ts plane carried neither bombing nor torpedo armament The soviet government lays on he United States government all he responsibility for the criminal action of the American military authorities Foreign Minister An drei Y Vishinsky asserted Vishinskys note was a reply to a United States charge brought oefore the UN that a twinengine Russian bomber fired on a United Nations fighter patrol off Korea and then was shot down by the patrol in returning the fire The body of a soviet lieutenant was found in the plane the U S charged The Moscow broadcast said U S Ambassador Alan G Kirk refused to accept the soviet note insist ing the question must be exam ined in the United Nations and not by the United States govern ment The broadcast added that Foreign Minister Vishinsky pointed out to Mr Kirk the com plete groundlessness of such rea soning Claims Responsibility Ours Vishinsky insisted the incident is in no way related to the mili tary operations in Korea He contended that since the soviet plane was shot down by Ameri can fighters the responsibility for their actions lies exclusively with the American military authori ties The soviet note warned of serious consequences of such incidents The U S said the incident took place off the west coast of Korea near the 38th parallel The Rus sian reply said the plane was en route to a soviet base 87 miles off the shores of Korea Moscow said 2 other planes on the same flight provided eyewit nesses to the attack It added that the soviet twinengined plane fell burning into the sea Moscow said the plane was fly ing from Port Arthur to the area of HaiYunTao island part of the frontier of Port Arthur naval base and situated 140 kilometers about 87 miles from the shores of Ko rea The island is approximately on the 39th parallel midway be tween Korea and Port Arthur The plane without any grounds or pretext was attacked and fired on by 11 fighters of the United States military air force the note said It described this as an out rageous violation of generally recognized rules of international law The note demanded a strict in vestigation and the punishment of the persons responsible It also demanded compensation for the loss caused by the death of the crew consisting of 3 pilots and the destruction of the soviet plane Serious Consequences The soviet government also con siders it necessary to draw the at tention of the United States gov ernment to the serious conse quences which such actions on the part of the American military authorities may have the note added The Russian reply to the Amer ican protest reversed the circum stances of last April when an American plane was shot down over the Baltic sea The Soviets at that time claimed the American was a B29 bomber violating Rus sian territory over Latvia The Americans said the plane was an unarmed navy privateer Russia rejected American protests Toll a Weekend Record Chicago nations vio lent death toll for the Labor day weekend was a record 565 A breakdown of the accidental deaths showed 389 killed in traf fic mishaps 78 drownings and 98 deaths caused by accidents of mis cellaneous nature The record toll compared to the previous high of 550 over the 1940 Labor day holiday The traf fic fatalities were under the 435 predicted by the National Safety council and also under last years all time high of 410 Ned H Dearborn council presi d e n t termed the traffic death count the most encouraging holi day traffic record since the war The count covered a 78hour 6 p m last Friday to midnight Monday Say December Draft To Top 70000 Mark By DAYTON MOORE Washington armys December draft call probably will lop the new request for 70000 in ductees in November informed ources said Wednesday The speedup in the draft rate coincided with reports that the number of regular army divisions may be increased from 10 to 18 and the marines may be per mitted to put a third fullstrength ground division under arms These developments were in line with President Trumans an nouncement last week that the armed forces would be increased to nearly 500000 more than the previous goal The defense department an nounced the new draft call Tues day It ordered the selective serv ice system to provide 70000 in ductees in more than the September and October quotas See New Divisions The army now has 10 regular army divisions It has asked con gress for money to pay for 11 di visions The marines have an nounced plans for 2 fullstrength divisions and may be authorized to add 1 more The marine the navy and the air not plan to Allied Troops Retake Yongchon in New Drive ask for draftees All 3 services expect to meet their manpower quotas with volunteers In addition to 170000 draftees the army already has called up 119000 unorganized reserves 4 national guard divisions and 2 regimental combat teams plus an Unspecified number of smaller or ganized reserve and national guard units The navy has called up 88000 reserves 1400000 lAs The air force has ordered to active duty 50000 unorganized re serves and an unspecified number of organized reserve and national guard outfits The marines have called up 50000 unorganized reserves and some organized reserve units Faced with steppedup demands for more military manpower se lective service officials were un able to predict how long their 1400000man pool of eligible lAs will last North lowans Among Reservists Called to Fort Hood Tex Des Moines of Iowa army and marine enlisted reserv ists continued Wednesday as the Iowa military district announced active duty orders for another 140 reservists bringing the total re called in August and September to 1020 The marines recalled another 12 enlisted men All marines ordered back to duty are to report first to the ma rine recruiting station here for physical examinations then are to report to Camp Pendleton Cal by Sept 22 Army reservists recalled in cluded the following North lowans to report to Fort Hood Tex Sept 29 Charles Roy Peterson Mason Charles F Bower Pfc Eugene R Kriegcr Sgt Themistocles Zanios Cpl Lee M Maddocks PRESSES FOR STATEHOOD Washington Truman prodded congress again Wednesday to vote statehood for Alaska and Hawaii and Demo cratic Leader Lucas I1L said the senate may consider next week statehood bills already passed by the house Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Fair and dry through Thursday Low Wednesday night 42 High Thursday 80 SubIowa Fair and somewhat warmer Wednesday and Thurs day Low Wednesday night near 45 east and 4550 west High Thursday 82 8G Southerly winds 2025 MPH west and 15 20 east Thursday Further out look Mostly fair and rather warm Friday and Saturday Low Thursday night in upper 50s High Friday 8488 Minnesota Fair and somewhat warmer Wednesday night Thursday fair and rather warm Low Wednesday nifiht middle 50s High Thursday middle 80s IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette Weather statistics for the 24 hours ending at 8 a m Wednesday Maximum 74 Minimum 41 At 8 a m 57 YEAR AGO Maximum 77 Minimum 52 AP Wirephoto REDS DRIVE NEARER TO Korean break through in northeast A has pushed back the allied de fense line Pohang has been retaken by the reds but Kyong ju main highway junction to the southwest of the port was still in allied hands Battle raged at Yongchon 20 miles east of Taegu Another enemy thrust B from north of Taegu was within 10 miles of the city In the south C U S troops battered 3 enemy battalions which infiltrated lines in MasanHaman area Yanks have pushed 5 miles west of Yongsan Largest red bridgehead is at Hyonpung southwest of Taegu Acheson Backs by Germany Washington of State Acheson said Wednesday it is highly desirable to find an ap propriate Way for Germany to aid the defense of western Europe He also told a news conference the meeting of the western foreign ministers at New York next week will cover almost every major world problem Acheson further said that the defensive preparations in the At lantic area have reached a stage where plans must be speedily translated into action He said it is time now to get the actual men equipment and command structure so that defense forces will be ade quate In discussing Germanys future defense role Acheson backed up the stand of John J McCloy high commissioner for Germany Mc Cloy said at the white house Tues day that the Germans should be enabled if they so desire to de fend their own country Acheson said McCioy was stat ing a very obvious and proper ob jective The secretary added that pur current purpose of strengthen ing the forces of western Europe is to protect the whole area includ ing the German people from ag gression Therefore he added it is highly desirable to find an appropriate way by which Germany can con tribute to the defense of western Europe Acheson did not say in what manner the western Germans might be given a part in the de fensive setup In response to a question he also said he did not know whether a decision on the problem will be reached at his Now York meeting with British Foreign Secretary Bevin and For eign Minister Schuman of France Cedar Rapids Bus Lines Hit by Strike Cedar Rapids Rapids city lines buses were idle Wed nesday after 60 drivers and 10 shopmen went on strike at mid night Tuesday night in a wage dispute All the striking employes are members of the AFL bus drivers union The union seeks a 10 cents an hour wage boost Pat Ganley international repre sentative of the union from Chi cago said a union committee re jected the companys final offer of a 3 cents an hour wage increase plus an additional 4 cents an hour boost if the city council would approve a fare iijcrense Most residents who normally ride buses got to work by riding with friends The school district has its own buses II Drive Right Brings Drop in Accidents DCS Moines Drive Right campaign of the past 2 weeks brought a decrease of 5 deaths 254 injured and 144 acci dents over the corresponding pe riods in recent years the Iowa Safety congress reported Wednes day to Gov William S Beardsley The report termed the campaign highly successful and a most ef fective demonstration of the pos sibilities of reducing the traffic toll in the state by individual ef forts to drive right The final figures for the 2 weeks showed a reduction of 5 from the average for correspond ing periods in the last 3 years down 254 from the average of the past 2 years Total down 144 from the average for the last 2 years All this the report said was ac complished in the face of a general 10 per cent increase in Iowa traf fic over the same time last year making the past 2 weeks the pe riod of highest traffic volume in the history of the state With an estimated 50000 more motor vehicles registered over year the Iowa state fair and Labor day holiday as normally added traffic hazards the report noted that the drive right campaign apparently reversed a trend which brought 4218 more accidents in the 1st 6 months of 1950 over the same halfyear in 1949 Of the 22 deaths the report said 9 occurred in collisions 10 when motor vehicles ran off roadways and 2 in traincar encounters One was a pedestrian victim Seven of the 22 occurred on county roads 10 during daylight hours and 12 during the night Teenagers often blamed in Iowa accident reports for respon sibility for a large share of acci dents fared well in the drive right efforts summary No teen agers were involved in the fatal accidents and Chief S N Jesper sen of the Iowa highway patrol commended the youngsters as hav ing done well during the cam paign Pattons Meet Enemy Thrust in Northeast On the Taegu Front Korea and South Ko rean troops withdrew to a new line of defense north of Taeru Wednesday The 1st cavalry di vision gave up Z hills in an at tempt to tighten the line against communist forces which were probing the front f By RUSSELL BRINES Tokyo troops retook Yongchon Wednesday in a counter attack that stop ped red Korean thrusts at Taegu and regained some lost ground But the reds threw 84 new Russianmade tanks on the northern and eastern Korean battlefields where new U S Patton tanks made their war appearance a few days ago A big tank battle seems imminent with the al lied side having some demon strated advantage through airplane support Good weather unleashed U S 5th air force bombers and fighters on the enemy tanks By dusk Wednesday 17 red tanks were knocked destroyed and 7 damaged by aerial attack Night fighters and bombers con tinued the attack Wednesday night Lose Anchor But the allied eastern sea an chor line on the 120mile Korean warfront had collapsed That allowed communist troops and tanks to spew toward Taegu hub of the northern and western front and southward toward Pusan the chief allied port in the southeast Pohang No 2 allied port on the SITUATION SERIOUS NOT DISASTROUS Washington defense department described the situa tion in the northeast sector of the Korean battle front Wed nesday as serious but not dis astrous Briefing officers at the Penta gon said there had been no gen eral breakthrough by the Ko rean reds An army spokesman said the reds had achieved important ad vances iji the critical area be tween Pohang and Taegu but that nowhere had the enemy been able to push to any place where he did not come up against allied opposition SAMU Blitk iettk ia iMt Sea of Japan coast fell to the reds Allied fire bombs in Wednesdays air attacks set the city aflame It has changed hands twice in the 10 weekold war Yongchon a major battle goal 20 miles east of Taegu was seized by communist guerrillas Tuesday It was retaken by an allied coun terattack Wednesday morning American aerial observers told AP Correspondent Leif Erickson the function was in al lied hands late Wednesday The fate of Taegu depended upon the battle for Yongchon and the highway between the 2 cities Taegu Calm Correspondent Erickson said Taegu was calm while battles flared to the east and north of it The rail hubis the largest city left in the allied sector of Korea The allied east wing first fell apart Tuesday near Kigye 9 miles northwest of Pohang Reds poured through that hole toward Kyongju 18 miles south west of Pohang But that important rail and road junction was saved by stiffening allipd defenders who shoved back the advancing reds Wednesday The communists moved 2 miles nearer to Taegu down the Kumh wa bowling alley They took the town of Tabu and held posi tions 10 miles north of the allied supply center These advances and grinding American gains west of Yongsan 32 miles south of Taegu cost the reds 2035 dead and wounded in the 24hour period ended at noon Wednesday General MacArthur reported the red losses in his war summary A U S 8th army communique Wednesday night reported that al lied forces fighting eastward of Yongchon and northward of Kyongju were halting the com munist exploitation of his break through south of Kigye Correspondent Erickion in Tae gu said allied aerial   

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