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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: August 14, 1950 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - August 14, 1950, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME MASON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS HOME EDITION VOL LVI Associated Press ond United Press Full Lease Wires Five Cents a Copy MASON CITY IOWA MONDAY AUGUST 14 1950 This Paper Consists of Two One No 264 One Mans Opinion A Radio Commentary By W EARL HALL Managing Editor Outmoded Calendar Is Expensive Luxury AFTER successfully meeting every other argument raised against adoption of the World cal endar its proponents now are able to present proof that clinging to the present outmoded Gregorian calendar is an expensive luxury Its dollars out of our lots of added day we cling to it This showing was accomplished by a referendum conducted among businesses ranging from manu facturing plants of all kinds to banking and insurance with doz ens of lines in between The testi monial of a majority was Wed be helped financially by an improvement on our present calendar Complaints Are Listed And here are some of the things that were in their mind in report ing on their dissatisfaction with the present bguess and bgosh calendar Theres a variation in the num ber of weekdays per month This makes comparisons by months im possible Theres a variation in the length of the quarters again making it impossible to draw intelligent comparisons Holidays hop all over the week from year to year falling in mid week some years and at weekend in other years The same thing that makes a holiday do the grasshopper act causes a given date and day one year to differ the next year with no two successive years alike in this regard Expenses Pushed Up These weaknesses in the Gregor ian calendar manifest themselves in a number of ways mostly un satisfactory to both management and labor For example a travel ing salesmans expenses are ap preciably boosted when he must lay over at some point in his territory because of a midweek holiday Losses result from illtimed ad vertising because of calendar vari ations operations in a factory are crippled by holidays which invite overlong weekend A 4th of July falling on a Tues day for example has the effect of making the Monday of that an extremely unsatisfactory work day 6 Isolated Days in 1952 In 1952 alone there will be 6 such isolated weekdays New Years will fall on Tuesday isolat ing Monday The same will be true of Lincolns birthday on Tuesday Feb 12 Armistice day will fall on a Tuesday too Then at the other end of the week Washingtons birthday will come on Friday likewise Memo rial day and Independence day This means that Saturday will be set off by itself with many if not most of oui workers doubting that its worth while showing up for duty on that one isolated day The total loss chargeable to an antiquated calendar in this single year 1952 is estimated at 723328 Thats awfully close to a half billion dollars How accurate the estimate is I cant say I only know that the estimate is offered by people who dont ordinarily go off halfcocked Borne Out by Government The office of business economics in the United States department of commerce was consulted to deter mine if this is a reasonable and accurate economic projection Its response We have checked the basic fig ures on employment and hourly earnings used in the calculations of the direct loss to labor and they Reds Place Bridges Under Water GlobeGazette photo by Musser MORE IMPORTANT THAN HYDROGEN Gen Leif Jack Sverdrup right member of a board that will select the site for the new hydrogen bomb plant now in the midst of training the 102nd reserve division at Camp McCoy Wis for possible duty in Korea was mainly interested in another subject at Indianhead home of Gen and Mrs Hanford MacNider over the weekend He and Gen MacNider are shown admiring the latters 1st grandchild Elizabeth Radar Screen Now Protects Vital Cities in agreement with official data of the government These wandering workdays are the enemy of both industry and labor They will be with us as long as we cling to our outmoded cal endar World Calendar Described But the problem would be al most 100 per cent solved by adopt ing the World calendar the chief marks of which are these The World calendar retains present 12 months all names re tained The World calendar provides 4 quarters of identical months 13 weeks 91 ways the same never changing The World calendars months all have 26 weekdays plus Sundays The World calendars quarters all start with a Sunday January 1 is always a Sunday The World calendar every year would have an extra day follow ing every Dec 30 and preceding each Jan 1 It would be known as Worlds day The World calendar once every 4 years would have a leap year day between June 30 and July 1 1 Too Many Days Each Year Our present calendar hodge podge grows out of the fact that 365 the number of days in the year isnt exactly divisible by 7 the number of days in a week Fiftytwo times 7 is 364 That leaves one dangling troublemak ing day to mess things up gener ally By FRED MULLEN Washington UR Areas most vital to the nations security and industrial potential now are fully protected by a network of radar stations and air bases for intercep tor planes it was learned Monday An air force spokesmansaid the emergency radar network was set up with World war II equipment He said it could serve effectively until the projected permanent radar network has been com pleted It does not give complete cov erage of the nation he said but it is concentrated on those areas most vital to the security and in dustrial potential of the nation he said The radar network consists of two defense rings The outer ring extends along the Canadian bor der and at least halfway down the Atlantic and Pacific coasts The inner rings provide specific pro tection for individual industrial cities in the northeast central and northwest The air force is alread3r operat ing the emergency network 24 hours a day in an effort to make sure that this country is never again caught unawares as it was at Pearl Harbor In the meantime it is working hard on the permanent aircraft and radar control system author ized by congress in March 1949 Though the act authorized an ex penditure of for the project congress has not put up any funds specifically for it The lawmakers however have authorized the air force to take from its regular appro priations and use it to purchase sites and facilities for the net work House May Cancel Postal Economy With New Bill Washington house re versed itself Monday and decided tentatively that it doesnt want to save money by cutting postal service It voted 248 to 81 to take from its rules committee and bring to a house vote Tuesday a bill can celling a postoffice department order to reduce home deliveries to one a day and limit other service The rules committee had kept the bill from a house vote The size of Mondays ballot forcing the bill to a test indicated that it would pass Tuesday and go to the senate If it passes the senate the bill then would have to get President Trumans approval before it be came a law The postal curtailment order was issued on April 17 almost one month after the house appropri ations committee had suggested that the department try to save some money by cutting down on service including a reduction of the number of deliveries per day to many areas Two Division Commanders Confer Here War experiences in the Pacifi and possibly in the futur discussed here Sunday b two outstanding veterans o General MacArthurs World wa II campaigns They were two major generals and reserve division commanders J Sverdrup of St Louis and Hanford MacNider of Mason City Gen Sverdrup was immediate ly concerned with two huge de fense projects He is a member of the board that will select the site for the new 200 milliondollar hydrogen bomb plant He was amused by a Sunday news dis patch from Little Rock Ark stat ing the plant had already been located in Arkansas To Operate Center J S Seeks to Revoke Bail of Top Reds Convicted Communist Leaders Declared To Be a Security Danger Washington The govern ment announced Sunday it is seek ng to have the bails of the na 5ons top 11 convicted communist eaders revoked on grounds their conduct and activity is dangerous o the security of the United States Attorney General J Howard McGrath said Federal Judge Thomas W Swan has issued an order requiring the communist leaders to show cause in New York on Aug 17 why the bails should not be revoked sending them to jail Convicted In October The communist leaders were convicted in New York last Oct 14 on charges that they conspired to advocate the violent overthrow of the U S government All except one have been free on total bonds of ing from to efich The convicted leaders are Eugene Dennis John B Wil liamson Jacob Stachel Robert G Thompson Benjamin J Davis Jr Henry Winston John Gates Irv ing Potash Gilbert Green Carl Whiter and Gus Hall Dennis is already serving a prison term for contempt of con gress McGrath said in a statemen that the decision is to ask the court to send the group to jail was after he had conferred Aug 10 with Irving H Saypol U S attorney for the southern distric of New York Reasons Given The attorney general said Say pol prepared and executed an affidavit stating reasons why th justice department deemed the action necessary On the basis of this action Sat urday McGrath said Judge Swan issued his order for the defendant to answer Aug 17 in New York in the 2nd circuit court of appeals McGrath said the grounds stated in the affidavit were There does not exist any sub stantial questions as to the judg ment of conviction herein and the defendants have pursued and will continue to pursue a course of conduct and activity dangerous to the public welfare safety and na SOUTH ST PAUL HOTEL BURNS St Paul UR The 5story Jewell hotel was a partially crumbled ruins Monday as a re sult of a fire which swept through it late Sunday Under the World calendar ap proach the one orphan day that so much trouble under our Continued on Page 2 Girl Killed When Auto Hits Bridge Ites 17 daugh er of Mr and Mrs Ed Ites of near Buffalo Center was killed and hnr companion Morris A VVortman 19 of Lakota suffered cuts and bruises when a car driven by the latter crashed into a bridge on highway 9 two miles northwest of here at a m Monday According to highway patrol men who investigated the acci dent Wortman went to sleep at the wheel and hit the bridge on the right side The car came to rest crosswise with the highway Miss Ites is believed to have been killed instantly First at the scene of the acci dent were Henry Hippen and Stanley Stecker of Lakota who notified authorities The injured young man was taken to a hospital at Buffalo Center The two were returning home from a trip when the accident oc curred The young man Is a son of Mr and Mrs Ernest Wortman of La kotn Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Considerable cloudi ness Monday night Tuesday partly cloudy Low Monday night 60 to 65 High Tuesday 80 to 85 Iowa Partly cloudy Monday night with low 60 to 66 Partly cloudy Tuesday with high in mid80s Further outlook Partly cloudy and a little warmer Wednesday showers likely west portion Wednesday night and over most of the state Thursday Turning a little cooler Thurs day or Thursday night Minnesota Partly cloudy Monday night and Tuesday Scattered showers northwest portion Tuesday afternoon or night Warmer near Lake Superior Tuesday Low Monday night 5560 west and north and 60 A subsidiary of Sverdrups firm Sverdrup and Parcel named Aro Inc has been engaged by the air force to operate its 100 mil lion dollar Arnold Engineering Development Center now being built at Tullahoma Tenn The Tullahoma Center blue prints for which were drawn by Sverdrup engineers will be ready for operation Jan 1 1952 The job of operating it will take some of the top men in his engineering firm which has its headquarters in St Louis Sverdrup said MacNider Division Next Gen Sverdrups 102nd infantry division made up of units in Missouri and southern Illinois has just finished one week of its AP Wirephoto YANKS COUNTER ATTACK AS REDS MASS FOR TAEGU arrows locate major American and South Korean action against North Korean drives solid Americans launched a counter attack at Changnyong A against reds trying to break out of their bulge east of the Naktong river To the north reds massed on the rivers west bank on both sides of Waegwan B for a drive on Taegu At Pohang on the east coast UN forces fought a holding action and on the south coast front U S marines moved to the outskirts of Chinju Raid Close to Soviet Border Token of U S Determination By ELTON C FAY AP Military Affairs Reporter Washington United States has given Russia a new and unmistakable token of its determination to fight the Korean war even at the risk of open soviet intervention A mission of American air force Superfortresses in a strike on a North Korean city slammed down more than 500 ons of bombs so close to Russia the distant rumble of the attack probably was heard across the Jorder This weekend bombing mission o the North Korean port city of tional security of the United States twoweek active period at Camp duty training McCoy Wis 65 southeast around 80 High Tuesday IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics for the 24 hours ending at 8 a m Monday Aug 14 Maximum Minimum At 8 a m YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum 71 62 66 83 65 General MacNiders 103rd infan try division made up of Iowa and Minnesota personnel will follow the 102nd into Camp McCoy on Aug20 The two generals are close mili tary colleagues of long standing and derive considerable pleasure from friendly competition between their two divisions General MacNider was invited to Camp McCoy to take the salute of the 102nd division in review Saturday morning and trooping the line with Gen Sverdrup On Aug 26 Sverdrup will fly from St Louis to McCoy to take the same compliment from Gen Mac Nider and his 103rd division On War Footing Training of the two commanding generals reserve divisions is on a war footing this summer The re cent announcement that two more reserve divisions would be called soon led to speculation among the commanders and personnel of these infantry outfits as to the de fense departments future plans for such divisions which have been developed and trained over a period of years Gen oveidrup came to Mason City Saturday afternoon with the Mason Cityan and visited here until Sunday afternoon when his plane arrived to take him back to Camp McCoy GlobeGazette Weather Statis tics for the 24 hours ending at 8 a m Sunday Aug 13 Maximum Minimum At 8 a m YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum 74 55 60 82 69 DIES IN SHALLOW DIVE Manchester Cul ver 21 of Maloy Iowa died at a hospital here Monday of injuries suffered when he made a shallow dive into the Maquoketn river a Hartwick Sunday Culvers neck was broken in the accident LastHope Search for Chris Reynolds Lone Pine Cal a last hope search for Tobacco Heir Christopher Smith Reynolds mountainwise climbers started Monday to scale the forbidding east face of the nations highest peak Mount Whitney The frozen body of his com panion Steven Rice Wasserman ivas found in a snowy crevasse at he 11500foot level Sunday a week after the two 17yearold eastern scions had set out to con quer Whitneys toughest side Scant hope was held by veter an searchers that young Reynolds s still alive unless he wandered off for aid for Wasserman Mon days search will be concentrated on higher crevasses of the 14496 foot peak Young Reynolds mother for mer Torchsinger Libby Holman was ready to fly from Paris The boy heir to a fortune was born to Miss Holman shortly after her husband Zachary Reyn olds vas mysteriously slain Wassermans parents Mr and Mrs William Stix Wasserman of Philadelphia and New York were at nearby Whitney portal when the body of their son was identi fied The father a millionaire broker and economist had spenl most of the day flying over the area Young Wassermans body wa found at the base of the sheer 3 000foot granite cliff that chal langes climbers approaching from the east Steven Wassermans Father With Mason City Editor on Tour The tragic death of 17yearold Steven Wasserman in the upper reaches of Mount Whitney in California was of special concern to the GlobeGazette editor Earl Hall William Wasserman the boys father a Boston and New York broker was a member of the na tional defense orientation tour with Editor Hall in June The Ma son Cityan remembered the brok er well was one of the most daring and delicate operations of the war Margin for Error The difference between putting 3ombs down on a North Korean target or through accident and error in navigation having them all on soviet territory was a mat ter of about 5 minutes flying time or a big formation maneuvering at a speed of more than 3 miles a minute But there was an even greater calculated risk How could Rus sia react to the appearance of American planes bombed and armed for combat so close to her doorstep There was this to remember On April 8 before there was any shooting war anywhere and in a different part of the world 4 Rus sian fighters shot down a United States navy patrol plane over the waters of the open Baltic This at tack occurred more than 30 miles from the nearest Russian territory in an area supposedly free to sea or air navigation by any nation and was made when the United States was at war with no one Moscow thereafter let it be known that more action of the same kind could be expected if foreign planes got too close to its iron curtain No Russian Reaction Whatever the reason there was no indication that the soviet air force reacted to the Najin mis sion Information received here said nothing of the sighting by the bomber mission of nonAmerican aircraft All operations southward along his coastline in a series of short water hops using small coastal steamers and other craft and moving usually by night Wei Worked Over The B29 bombers during the ast 7 weeks have pretty well vorked over profitable strategic argets in Korea Oil refineries and some manufacturing centers have een plastered often and heavily With these targets at least tem porarily scratched the bombing Drogram called for shifts to other smaller but important strategic Najin This northward movement of the strategic bomb line necessarily carried with it the calculated risk that the North Koreans sponsor ind neighbor Russia might react t was the choice between letting the North Korean transportation and manufacturing centers contin ue to feed help to the front or tak ing a chance of trouble with the Soviets The question had to be decided sooner or later in the Korean war presumably are carried on by direction or approval of Gen Douglas MacArthurs far eastern command It in turn receives its broad strategic directives from the joint chiefs of staff here The joint chiefs strategy is of course geared to the high overall policy defined at diplomatic level Thus it must be assumed the decision to carry the air war to the very edgp of Russian territory has the sanction of the top policy shapers The reason for hitting Najin seems to have been based on solid military grounds It is a rail cen ter and port town through which North Korean supplies and re inforcements have been moving During recent weeks the enemy has been moving men and materia US Counter Blow Delays Enemy Drive 24th Division Led by Pershing Tanks Blunts River Crossing By KELMAN MORIN Tokyo AP Thrusting underwater bridges across the Naktong river the North Korean reds probed Tuesday for an imminent drive on Taegu by an estimated 60000 men on this 5th anniversary of Koreas liberation from Japan A summary issued early Tuesday by General Mac Arthurs Tokyo headquarters placed the threat near Waeg wan 12 miles northwest of Taegu main forward Amer ican base on the central front of South Korea There it said the reds were believed to have com pleted a 2nd underwater bridge Such stone and log crossings are sunk about a foot below the surface to es cape detection from the air Twentythree miles south of Taegu the American 24th in f a n t r y division counterat tacked and shoved the red 4th division back 1000 yards to a mile MacArthurs sum mary however said the ene my still was moving reinforce ments to the rivers east bank in that sector southwest of Changnyong The greatest threat how ver was around Waegwan where the reds were assemb ling their largest force It is believed to be the most effective mass drawn from 15 reds had shoved up to the long curling battleline And it greatly outnumbers any thing the allies have to op pose them A red attack down the Taejon Taegu mountain valley corridor was expected momentarily Tues day is the 5th anniversary of the liberation of Korea from Japan Such anniversaries are likely oc casions in Oriental reckoning for demonstrations of strength Reds Pushed Back As the red thousands assembled west of vhe Naktong river Ameri can troops recaptured muddy slopes on the allied eastern side of the stream from some of the 12000 Kellogg Plane Crash Kills 5 Newton persons were killed outright in the crash of a light plane near here Monday The dead were identified as Richard L Wyncs 33 Dubuque city councilman his wife their two children and a 3rd child The plane crashed in a cornfield near Kellogg 4 miles east of here The plane was demolished Bodies of the victims were scat tered over a considerable area Coroner Ralph Toland said it first was believed only 4 were killed The toll was raised when the 5th body was found The 5th victim was Brenda Bosley 11 a niece of Mr and Mrs Wyncs who had boarded the plane in DCS Moincs to fly with the group back to Dubuque SAME Black meant death In paal 21 hourt reds who crossed the river at Changnyong 23 miles south of Taegu The communists have been try ing to break out from their Nak tong rivercrossing bulge for 8 days Their objective is Pusan No 1 Korean port in the southeast 55 miles from Taegu The U S 24th division moving up behind 45ton Pershing tanks attacked the rivercrossers at dawn Monday They shoved the North Koreans back from 1000 yards to a mile along a flaming milelong sector on the allied east ern bank of the river Point blank high velocity fire met the attacking Americans In telligence officers said the com munists had managed to get ar tillery and possibly some tanks over the river Use Big Rocket As weather cleared after rain navy planes firing new 1175inch rockets for the 1st time in anger hit the reds They destroyed a bridge with the new weapon and blasted communist tanks and gun positions At the deep south anchor of the battleline U S marines took hills just outside rubbled Chinju U S 25th infantry division troops poked through the Hinterland looking for a battalion of reds cut off by the smashing American offensive of last week that practically de stroyed the red 6th infantry divi sion around Chinju At the other end of the 140 mile battleline American infantry and tanks still held the U S air strip 6 miles south of Pohang No 2 east coast port on the sea of Japan Planes no longer used the field however Pohang port was in the hands of a red battalion but South Ko reans were challenging them there at Kigye 9 miles northwest and at other points in the Pohang area 4 Elite Red Divisions Intelligence officers at General MacArthurs headquarters said both the Pohang onslaught and Changnyong river ciossing were designed to drain off as much al V   

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