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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - August 5, 1950, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER FOR THE HOME MASON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE THI NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS HOME EDH ION lUliif VOL LVI Associated Press and United Full Lease Wires Five Cents a Copy MASON CITY IOWA SATURDAY AUGUST 5 1950 This Paper Consists ot Two No 257 s Cross Naktong River in Northwest Attempt to Clear China Relations Harriman Sent to Confer on Policy With MacArthur Tokyo UR Gen Douglas MacArthur will tell special presidential assistant W Averell Harriman that Americas efforts in Korea will be useless unless the United States is ready to meet the communist challenge everywhere else in Asia a reli able source said Saturday By JOHN M HIGHTOWER Washington A desire to clarify U S relations with the Chinese nationalists was reported Saturday to be behind the Tokyo conference of Gen Douglas Mac Arthur and W Averell Harriman That is understood to be the chief reason why President Tru man dispatched his foreign affairs coordinator to MacArthurs head quarters for a discussion of far eastern political questions Harri man left here Friday and is due to be in Tokyo until next Wednes day In announcing the trip at a news conference this week the presi dent emphasized that MacArthur and Harriman would talk about a number of outstanding problems out of the Korean crisis Foremost among these problems In official thinking here it was learned Saturday is that of For mosa the nationalist stronghold The Formosa issue is considered urgent for two reasons on which be Major War Would Change American Education System By DEWITT MACKENZIE AP Foreign Affairs Analyst The prospect that the Korean conflict will run a long time in one form or another presents a lot of problems One of them is education The danger of a protracted struggle brought this question from David Taylor Marke AP education editor What will be the effect on the youth of America and conse quently on our wayof life if this ideological strife compels the United States to maintain a vast military machine over a long pe riod of years No Normal Life Thats not a happy question to contemplate Obviously it means that time will be set back for all of xis and especially for those whose education is interrupted by military service Young men going into uniform now might never again see what we regard as a normal life As Marke points out those en gaged in war service for a long period would have lost the educa tion necessary to prepare them for civilian life Especially as regards the skilled professions By that token the standard of education itself would be lowered I suppose the solution or par tial solution of this problem must depend on how far the govern ment would be able to go in short ening the length of military serv ice so to permit a resumption of education That in turn must de pend on the nature of the war its length and its demand on man Harriman was fully briefed fore he left Washington Doesnt Want Conflict power All Must Serve 1 The United States besides wanting to keep the island from the communists does not want it to become a new focus of conflict in the far east Therefore it does iff not want to tie up too closely with Generalissimo Chiang Kaishek whose avowed aim is to reconquer the mainland of China and who apparently regards the Korean conflict simply as a stage in a de veloping communist war 2 The time of year in which the Chinese communists could assault Formosa across 100 miles of open water is drawing to a close That makes the rest of this month es pecially critical if the communists intend to strike they must do so in the next 3 weeks MacArthur visited Chiangs headquarters at Taipeh Formosa last Monday to turn down the gen eralissimos offer of troops for Ko rea and to confer with him on the defenses of the island Their con ference was followed by separate statements from both men saying they had agreed on the basis for the defense of Formosa Hasnt Learned Results Authoritative sources here say MacArthur did not advise Wash ington or at least the state depart ment and white house about his them in the dark as to the results he achieved Policy makers here assume Mac Arthur acted under President Tru mans general instructions for the protection of Formosa and dis cussed only defensive military ar rangements with Chiang The Harriman trip is said to be for the purpose of making certain this assumption is correct as well to clarify between Washington and Toyko precisely what Ameri can policy toward Formosa is This policy has been spelled out already in general terms by Mr Truman What he has said boils down to neutralizing Formosa in relation to the Korean war keep Ing it out of communist hands and leaving its final disposition either to a Japanese peace settlement or to the United Nations Report FORECAST Mason City Partly cloudy through Sunday Low Saturday night 62 High Sunday 85 Iowa Partly cloudy Saturday night and Sunday with a few scattered showers in the ex treme west portion East to southeast winds 15 MPH with very slowly rising humidity Sunday High Sunday 80 to 85 Low Saturday night 58 to 65 Further outlook Partly cloudy with slowly rising temperature trend Monday Tuesday scat V tered showers IN MASON CITY Globe Gazette weather statis tics for the 24 hours ending at 8 a m Maximum Minimum 56 At 8 a m 68 When it comes to drafting men for service there has been no dis crimination Every man of mili tary age who is fit must go into some sort of service True he may be assigned to a task other than combat service because of special qualifications But he must serve All this is bound to affect the life of the entire country from family to national affairs In fact a very long war would create pretty much of a new world which would have dropped a lot of progress by the wayside It is hard to see how there could be anything approaching a satisfactory solution of this tre mendous problem However it is a situation which undoubtedly is being studied by our law makers and perhaps can at least be al leviated in some degree Note Reveals Cashier Spent Money at Tracks Morris 111 small towi bank cashier who killed himself 10 days ago and whose account later were discovered to be shor preferred death to prison sentence The choice by the bank cashier Wendell Dirst 57 and the dis closure that he lost most of th money at the tracks were re vealed in a note read at an in quest into his death Friday The jury ruled financial wor ries led Dirst to kill himself IN KOREAN RAID An in fantry company under command of Lt John L Buckley of Augusta Ga has spear headed a raiding party in Korea made a daring 22mile penetration into enemy lines captured valuable documents maps and equipment and re turned successfully to its own lines The raid was carried out on night of Aug 2 in the crucial Chinju area Soys North Koreans Fight to Lost Man Washington Pentagon spokesman warned Saturday that the North Korean commu nists will fight to the last man and that the battles now shap ing up at the north and south ends of the line will not be the last Even if they made the heavi est kind of attack you can as sume they will continue to the last inch of land if they can he told newsmen at a briefing ses Says State Employes Still Friendly to Reds By THOR J JENSEN Staff Representative Clear Lake There are still many in the U S state depart ment who have been advocating a yielding attitude toward Rus sias ambitions U S Sen B B Hickenlooper declared here Sat urday No I am not accusing them of being communists he said in answer to a question but they are certainly far far to the left The state departments policy which is followed by the presi dent is a refusal to recognize that the Kremlin is out for world do minion the senator declared Sympathetic To Russia Our whole foreign policy for a number of years has been influ enced by a group of men within the state department who are sym pathetic toward Russian ambitions Hickenlooper continued When the reporter referred to Sen McCarthy the Iowa senator said heatedly that Sen McCarthy is only one of many in the last 4 years including the appropria tions committee who have called the attention of the president and the state department to his group of people For example he said the state department sold the people a bill of goods that the Chinese commu nists were only agrarian reform ers Now they control China Invitation To Reds And Secretary Achesons an nouncement almost a year ago that we were pulling out of the orient was an open invitation to the reds to gobble it up We are reaping the whirlwind in Korea now that was at Yalta and Potsdam Hickenlooper continued The agreements there amounted to a betrayal of the free nations of the world The territory surrendered to the Russians then put them into a position now to foment trouble in all parts of the world he ex plained Were suffering today for the blunders they have made he sion Theyve put on a vigorous said referring to the administra campaign Though their losses tj ampaign Though have been materials and simply continue regardless of those heavy losses Theyll fight to the last man The spokesman attributed that to the training the Korean reds have received explaining In World war II the Soviets had no regard for lost millions The United State uses equipment and saves human life wherever possible When you have an enemy with an utter disregard for human life you can expect them to go right to the last ditch Sports Bulletin Philadelphia Gran Ham ners double followed by Bride groom Mike Goliats home run in the 5th inning Saturday gave the league leading Philadelphia Phils a 2 to 1 victory over the St Louis Cardinals R H E St Louis 000 000 8 0 Philadel 000 8 1 Staley Munger 7 and Rice Meyer Konstanty 9 and Sem inick tion The Iowa senator believes that the U S position in the atomic energy field is still far superior to the Russian He refused to spe culate however on whether Rus sia would dare provoke us to war in the near future Wants Policy Explanation Russia is operating from inside a circle and could continue to har rass us with satellite troops with out her own troops ever appear ing he explained It is high time the president told the people what our policy is to be in Korea and in the future if such an outbreak should occur else where Hickenlooper said emphati cally But he accused the president of lagging far behind the congress in dealing with the problem of pre serving peace and preparing our defenses The 80th congress passed the Vandenberg resolution on abolition of the veto power in the UN except in matters involving force But the administration has done noth ing to implement that resolution Defends Congress Congress also voted several hundreds of millions of dollars to China and Korea which never was translated into aid he pointed out Congress also voted much more in military appropriations than has been used by the administra tion the senator said He men tioned specifically funds for a 70 group air force which the president refused in favor of a 40 group air force and funds never used which were to convert our submarines to the snorkel type and for in stalling the latest underwater de tection devices Hickenlooper is visiting at the Clear Lake cottage of Harold Rowe Cedar Rapids in connec tion with the Governors Days celebration He said he might fly to the Iowa department American Legion convention in Sioux City Sunday but that he had to be back in Washington Monday Beauty Makes Attempt on Life New Orleans Jean Floyd a New Orleans beauty win ner who was spanked last year by her former husband in a hotel lobby attempted to kill herself Friday Police Capt Edward Her mann said Police rescued the 20yearold Miss New Orleans of 1948 from her gasfilled apartment after an argument with her mother Ago Maximum Minimum 84 58 AP Wirephoto AFTER 6 WEEKS OF WAR IN Section on map defines area that remains to defending United States and South Korean troops after 6 weeks of war in Korea Broken lines show week to week penetration of in vading North Korean communists who moved across the 38th parallel on June 25 Korean time Hardpressed de fenders this week withdrew east of the Naktong river along central sector of the front On the southern end of the defense line red troops were about 35 miles from Pusan vital supply port GlobeGazette photos by Musser LOYALTY S Sen B B Hickenlooperhas been an annual visitor at Clear Lakes Governors Days celebration since the days when he was the honored guest He had to fly from Washington to Clear Lake between morning and night Friday in order to attend the annual stag party given by the Association for the Preservation of Clear Lake Here he is receiving his reward from Mrs W T Wolfram Clear big plate of fried chicken corn on the cob and trimmings FROM UPPER upper house of Iowas legislature was well represented at the stag Here are left to right Lt Gov Kenneth A Evans Emerson Sen Loyd Van Patten Indianola Sen J Kendall Lynes Plainfield wearing a centennial celebration beard two of their hosts Stanley L Haynes and Harold H Campbell both of Mason City and Clear Lake and Raf W Beckman Des Moines chief of the division of fish and game for the state conservation commission SAME Black mean traffic 34 kauri GOP Puts Politics Aside at Celebration Clear Lake Politics were put aside Friday evening by Iowas top republicans as they enjoyed the beauties of Clear Lake state park and the food prepared by the women of Ventura for the annual Governors Days stag par ty Several legislators said they expected the usual activity Sat urday There is a legislative ses sion in the offing they pointed out and candidates for speaker ship in the house ordinarily get the ball rolling at the Clear Lake gettogether Robert Goodwin state GOP chairman said no meeting of the committee is planned at Clear Lake He pointed out that Boyd Hayes Charles City and Sen Al den L Doud of Douds were the only other committee members at the stag Want Private Word There was not the usual gath ering of the politicians in groups of two or 3 in serious conversation although several times U S Sen Bourke B Hickenioopcr was drawn away from the crowd by individuals wanting a private word with him There was much laughter and banter over the tables loaded with fried chicken corn on the cob and other good food and as they finished their meal many of the men gathered around an accor dionist to sing Sen J Kendall Lynes Plain field was the good naturcd butt of frequent wisecracks because of the heavy black full beard he was wearing in preparation for his home towns centennial My father gave it to me 47 years ago Lynes roared back at one jokester W H Nicholas Mason City who defeated Lynes for the republican nomination for lieutenant gover nor also attended the party Lt Gov Kenneth A Evans Emerson who was not a candidate for reelection represented Gov William S Beardsley at the party The governor is to arrive Saturday afternoon for the celebration The governor was at Fort Leon ard Wood Mo Friday inspecting the Iowa national guardsmen en camped there He was to speak briefly at p m when he re ceives the key to Clear Lake from Mayor W H Ward and again at the banquet in his honor at 6 p m Trost Attends Stag Ewald G Trost Fort Dodge re elected chairman of the state con servation commission at its ses sion Friday afternoon and Arthur C Gingerich Wellman named vice chairman attended the stag with other members of the com mission Originally the stag party was in their honor but through the years it has grown until this year all state senators and representatives received personal invitations The crowd of more than 200 at Friday evenings party was the largest in its history Officers directors and commit tecmen of the Association for the Preservation of Clear Lake finance the party and act as hosts to the out of town guests Advised to Reduce Dies Princeton Iowa C H Wildman said Friday there would be no inquest intothe death of Carl Tilton 54 Princeton whose family said he shot himself to death after becoming despondent because his doctor advised him to reduce Tilton weighed 300 pounds Marines in Big Assault on Each Other By TOM LAMBERT With U S Marines in Korea Confused U S marines fired upon each other in a 6hour exchange of small arms fired during early morning darkness Saturday One marine was killed by his comrades The shooting started before midnight A furious hail of rifle and carbine fire swept ridges and Bullies about a command post a considerable distance from the front There were muttered threats by officers this morning about what would happen if the esti mated 6 hour battle was re peated The firing was unusual in that the leathernecks behaved quietly during the previous night Hard Night for Lambert Friday nights display might have risen from the fact a marine patrol Friday flushed a suspici ous Korean from a ridgetop near the command post The marines apparently were determined there would be a minimum of night movement and activity If that was their aim they cer tainly were least as far as Life Photographer David Duncan and this correspondent were concerned We had rolled up in blankets on the ridge above the command post between two high ridges During the firing which seemed to come from all directions our only movement was to ris dig farther into the ground Touched Off by Goal The marines must have fired thousands of rounds There was some shooting at very short notice Major Push on Pusan Imminent Allied Planes Strike at Massed Troops and Supplies By DON HUTH Tokyo Sunday IP Moving desperately by daylight the red invaders of South Korea made an unopposed crossing of the Nak tong river in the northern sector Saturday and jammed fresh masses of men against American positions in the cerfter and south A Korean release by General MacArthurs Tokyo headquarters said limited counterattacks and patrol actions by U S and South Korean troops throughout the entire defense area Saturday night kept the enemy off balance However the release said the enemy has continued to shuttle troops and materiel during the daylight hours thereby providing excellent targets for artillery and aircraft Losses Heavy This indicates that the reds are desperately striving for a main ef fort and an allout attempt to break through the new defense lines The release also reported heavy losses by the North Korean invad ers in repeated assaults against the U S 27th and 35th infantry regi ments in the Chinju sector near the southern tip of the line Field dispatches and briefing officers said these occurred Friday and Fri day night Apparently referring to the de fended part of the Naktong river to which the Americans and South Koreans withdrew earlier in the week MacArthurs release said no crossings have been made in force by the reds Transport Sunk American airmen knocked out 4 red tanks near Waegwan 15 miles from TaeguThey blasted a column of red troops artillery and trucks bound for Waegwan Gen MacArthurs headquarters announced the sinking of a 10000 ton North Korean transport at Inchon the port of Seoul An American light bomber pilot was credited with a direct hit The prime target of airmen was Chinju springboard for the reds southern drive Here the commu nists were massing 4 crack divi sions east of the city Allied pilots struck undamaged sectors of the city suspected hiding places for tanks and guns Chinju is 55 air miles from Pusan A U S 8th army communique said the enemy may launch an attack east of Chinju today The reds continued to probe the Amer ican front for soft spots while their supplies and reserves were being assembled in the rear Repulse Two Attacks A spokesman at MacArthurs headquarters said the 35th regi mental combat team of the U S 25th division hurled back two at tacks between Chinju and Masan with heavy losses to the enemy Friday night Associated Press Correspondent Leif Erickson said the 1st object ive of a big communist drive on the south coast likely would be the high ground in the Masan area 27 miles west of Pusan Should that fall he said the American defenders would be pushed back to a point where Pusan would become an advance supply base The communists were reported gathering in great strength at Kumchon 32 miles northwest of Taegu Dump Fire Bombs Allied airmen flew a record number of combat sorties a total of 452 Superforts dumped 80 tons of bombs on Seouls rail road yards Planes plastered lied bombs on Chin ju and burned out 4 villages in areas where the reds are massing their forces Fifteen night intruder missions were flown by fighters and bomb ers in an effort to harass commu nist preparations KILLED AT ELKADER Elkader Moss 66 Cedar Rapids was killed Friday when his car left a road one mile south of Elkader We once heard a far off challenge halt It was followed immediate ly by 4 quick shots Most of the time the challenge was not uttered At one point a marine turned on a jeeps lights The lights mo mentarily quieted the firing Then the lights were extinguished and the marines opened heavy firing again One marine said the firing wan touched off by a group of leather necks opening up on a night roaming goat   

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